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THE OSCAR® FINALISTS, PART TWO

OR, JOHN BARRY'S JAMES BOND SCORES? NEVER HEARD OF THEM

By Scott Bettencourt

In part one of this article, I discussed how the motion picture Academy's rules for the Best Score awards changed from the thirties through the fifties, including the procedure, begun in 1950, where a list of ten finalists were chosen from which the five nominees were picked.

These finalists' lists indicate that, for example, though Bernard Herrmann didn't receive a single nomination between 1947 and 1975, he was not completely forgotten by the Academy -- four of his scores were finalists (or three and a half, since one was The Egyptian), including Vertigo -- amazingly the only one of his Hitchcock scores to figure in the yearly ten.

Also, a few major science-fiction scores made the finalists' list that didn't get a nomination -- Destination Moon, The Day the Earth Stood Still, The War of the Worlds -- as well as two classic religious epics -- The Robe and The Ten Commandments -- whose lack of a score nomination has always seemed inexplicable to say the least.

However, my research into the finalists for both Score and Song showed that none of John Barry's James Bond music ever made the finalists' lists, not even such songs as "Goldfinger" and "You Only Live Twice." In fact, the Academy almost seemed to make it a point of nominating all the Bond songs that Barry didn't write -- "Live and Let Die," "Nobody Does It Better," "For Your Eyes Only," as well as a fairly inexplicable Best Score nomination for The Spy Who Loved Me.

Titles in bold italics are the finalists which did not receive nominations. Underlined titles are the winners.


SCORING OF A DRAMTIC OR COMEDY PICTURE

1960

THE ALAMO - Dimitri Tiomkin
THE APARTMENT - Adolph Deutsch
CIMARRON - Franz Waxman
ELMER GANTRY - Andre Previn
EXODUS - Ernest Gold
HIGH TIME - Henry Mancini
THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN - Elmer Bernstein
NEVER ON SUNDAY - Manos Hadjikdaks
NORTH TO ALASKA - Lionel Newman
SPARTACUS - Alex North


1961

BALLAD OF A SOLDIER - Mikhail Ziv
BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S - Henry Mancini
EL CID - Miklos Rozsa
FANNY - Morris Stoloff, Harry Sukman
THE GUNS OF NAVARONE - Dimitri Tiomkin
KING OF KINGS - Miklos Rozsa
ONE EYED JACKS - Hugo Friedhofer
ONE, TWO, THREE - Andre Previn
THE PARENT TRAP - Paul J. Smith
SUMMER AND SMOKE - Elmer Bernstein


1962

This year, the category's name was changed to:

MUSIC SCORE - SUBSTANTIALLY ORIGINAL

THE COUNTERFEIT TRAITOR - Alfred Newman
FREUD - Jerry Goldsmith
HATARI - Henry Mancini
LAWRENCE OF ARABIA - Maurice Jarre
MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY - Bronislau Kaper
TARAS BULBA - Franz Waxman
TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD - Elmer Bernstein
TWO FOR THE SEESAW - Andre Previn
WALK ON THE WILD SIDE - Elmer Bernstein
THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF THE BROTHERS GRIMM - Leigh Harline


1963

AMERICA, AMERICA - Manos Hadjidakis
CHARADE - Henry Mancini
CLEOPATRA - Alex North
55 DAYS AT PEKING - Dimitri Tiomkin
HOW THE WEST WAS WON - Alfred Newman
IT'S A MAD MAD MAD MAD WORLD - Ernest Gold
LILIES OF THE FIELD - Jerry Goldsmith
SUMMER MAGIC - Buddy Baker
TOM JONES - John Addison
TOYS IN THE ATTIC - George Duning


1964

THE AMERICANIZATION OF EMILY - Johnny Mandel
BECKET - Laurence Rosenthal
CHEYENNE AUTUMN - Alex North
THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE - Dimitri Tiomkin
HUSH HUSH SWEET CHARLOTTE - Frank DeVol
MARY POPPINS - Richard M. Sherman, Robert B. Sherman
THE PINK PANTHER - Henry Mancini
RIO CONCHOS - Jerry Goldsmith
TOPKAPI - Manos Hadjidakis
THE WORLD OF HENRY ORIENT - Elmer Bernstein


1965

THE AGONY AND THE ECSTASY - Alex North
CAT BALLOU - Frank DeVol
DOCTOR ZHIVAGO - Maurice Jarre
THE GREAT RACE - Henry Mancini
THE GREATEST STORY EVER TOLD - Alfred Newman
A PATCH OF BLUE - Jerry Goldsmith
THE SANDPIPER - Johnny Mandel
THAT DARN CAT! - Bob Brunner
THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG - Michel Legrand, Jacques Demy
WHAT'S NEW, PUSSYCAT? - Burt Bacharach


1966

The category name changed again, to:

ORIGINAL MUSIC SCORE

ALFIE - Sonny Rollins
ARABESQUE - Henry Mancini
THE BIBLE - Toshiro Mayuzumi
BORN FREE - John Barry
FANTASTIC VOYAGE - Leonard Rosenman
HAWAII - Elmer Bernstein
NEVADA SMITH - Alfred Newman
THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING, THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING - Johnny Mandel
THE SAND PEBBLES - Jerry Goldsmith
WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF - Alex North


1967

BONNIE AND CLYDE - Charles Strouse
COOL HAND LUKE - Lalo Schifrin
DOCTOR DOLITTLE - Leslie Bricusse
FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD - Richard Rodney Bennett
THE FLIM-FLAM MAN - Jerry Goldsmith
IN COLD BLOOD - Quincy Jones
LIVE FOR LIFE - Francis Lai
THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE - Elmer Bernstein
TWO FOR THE ROAD - Henry Mancini
WAIT UNTIL DARK - Henry Mancini


1968

In previous years, song scores were counted along with orchestral scores -- hence the nominations for Mary Poppins and Doctor Dolittle, with the arrangers receiving a separate nomination in the adaptation category. However, beginning this year, song scores were incorporated into the adaptation category, and the score category's name changed again:

ORIGINAL SCORE -- FOR A MOTION PICTURE [NOT A MUSICAL]

FOR LOVE OF IVY - Quincy Jones
THE FOX - Lalo Schifrin
THE HEART IS A LONELY HUNTER - Dave Grusin
THE LION IN WINTER - John Barry
PLANET OF THE APES - Jerry Goldsmith
RACHEL, RACHEL - Jerome Moross
ROMEO AND JULIET - Nino Rota
THE SHOES OF THE FISHERMAN - Alex North
THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR - Michel Legrand
WAR AND PEACE - Vyacheslav Ovchinnikov


1969

ANNE OF THE THOUSAND DAYS - Georges Delerue
BOB & CAROL & TED & ALICE - Quincy Jones
BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID - Burt Bacharach
GAILY, GAILY - Henry Mancini
THE HAPPY ENDING - Michel Legrand
THE MADWOMAN OF CHAILLOT - Michael J. Lewis
THE REIVERS - John Williams
THE SECRET OF SANTA VITTORIA - Ernest Gold
TRUE GRIT - Elmer Bernstein
THE WILD BUNCH - Jerry Fielding


1970

Another name change:

ORIGINAL SCORE

AIRPORT - Alfred Newman
THE ARISTOCATS - George Bruns
BENEATH THE PLANET OF THE APES - Leonard Rosenman
CROMWELL - Frank Cordell
DIRTY DINGUS MAGEE - Jeff Alexander
LOVE STORY - Francis Lai
PATTON - Jerry Goldsmith
PIECES OF DREAMS - Michel Legrand
RYAN'S DAUGHTER - Maurice Jarre
SUNFLOWER - Henry Mancini


1971

Yet another name change:

ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE

ESCAPE FROM THE PLANET OF THE APES - Jerry Goldsmith
THE FRENCH CONNECTION - Don Ellis
THE HELLSTROM CHRONICLE - Lalo Schifrin
KOTCH - Marvin Hamlisch
MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS - John Barry
NICHOLAS AND ALEXANDRA - Richard Rodney Bennett
SHAFT - Isaac Hayes
SOMETIMES A GREAT NOTION - Henry Mancini
STRAW DOGS - Jerry Fielding
SUMMER OF '42 - Michel Legrand


1972

This was the most convoluted year in the history of the Best Score award. The original five nominees were Images, Limelight, Napoleon and Samantha, Poseidon Adventure, and The Godfather, until it was discovered that the famous "Speak Softly Love" theme from The Godfather was originally composed by Rota for the Italian movie Fortunella in 1958.

The Academy then temporarily pulled Godfather's score nomination and resubmitted it along with the other five remaining finalists. The branch members voted and chose Sleuth to receive the fifth nomination.

To make things even more confusing, two years later, the score for The Godfather Part II, which incorporates themes from the original Godfather including the Fortunella theme, won Best Original Score.

The 1972 award ultimately went to Limelight, a film produced and scored in 1952 but not officially released in Los Angeles until 1972. After this award, the rules were changed so that older films could no longer be eligible under this technicality.

BEN - Walter Scharf
FELLINI'S ROMA - Nino Rota
THE GODFATHER - Nino Rota
IMAGES - John Williams
THE LIFE AND TIMES OF JUDGE ROY BEAN - Maurice Jarre
LIMELIGHT - Charles Chaplin, et al
NAPOLEON AND SAMANTHA - Buddy Baker
THE OTHER - Jerry Goldsmith
THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE - John Williams
SLEUTH - John Addison


1973

CINDERELLA LIBERTY - John Williams
THE DAY OF THE DOLPHIN - Georges Delerue
ENTER THE DRAGON - Lalo Schifrin
THE LAST AMERICAN HERO - Charles Fox
OKLAHOMA CRUDE - Henry Mancini
THE PAPER CHASE - John Williams
PAPILLON - Jerry Goldsmith
ROBIN HOOD - George Bruns
A TOUCH OF CLASS - John Cameron
THE WAY WE WERE - Marvin Hamlisch


1974

THE CASTAWAY COWBOY - Bob Brunner
CHINATOWN - Jerry Goldsmith
THE CONVERSATION - David Shire
EARTHQUAKE - John Williams
THE GODFATHER PART II - Nino Rota, Carmine Coppola
THE GOLDEN VOYAGE OF SINBAD - Miklos Rozsa
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS - Richard Rodney Bennett
SHANKS - Alex North
THE TOWERING INFERNO - John Williams
THE WHITE DAWN - Henry Mancini


1975

Another name change, but this one actually stuck -- at least until the nineties:

ORIGINAL SCORE

THE ADVENTURE OF SHERLOCK HOLMES' SMARTER BROTHER - John Morris
BIRDS DO IT, BEES DO IT - Gerald Fried
BITE THE BULLET - Alex North
THE EIGER SANCTION - John Williams
THE HINDENBURG - David Shire
JAWS - John Williams
ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST - Jack Nitzche
THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MOUNTAIN - Charles Fox
THE WIND AND THE LION - Jerry Goldsmith
THE YAKUZA - Dave Grusin


1976

KING KONG - John Barry
LOGAN'S RUN - Jerry Goldsmith
OBSESSION - Bernard Herrmann
THE OMEN - Jerry Goldsmith
THE OUTLAW JOSEY WALES - Jerry Fielding
THE PINK PANTHER STRIKES AGAIN - Henry Mancini
ROCKY - Bill Conti
SILENT MOVIE - John Morris
TAXI DRIVER - Bernard Herrmann
VOYAGE OF THE DAMNED - Lalo Schifrin


1977

In this year and this year only, the Music Branch members were presented with a list of twenty-three scores from which to select the five nominations. These films, as you can see, were largely major films from major composers (including the underappreciated Michael Small) but include one oddity, Walter Scharf's Gasp.

Scharf was a nomination-and-finalist perennial in all three categories. He is probably the only composer to be nominated for penning a serenade to a murderous rodent, with his popular title song for the Willard sequel Ben, immortalized by a young Michael Jackson.

1977 was my first year of steady moviegoing, and I must admit I'd never even heard of the movie Gasp, nor could I find the title in either Leonard Maltin or the Internet Movie Database. A little cross-checking (those old Screen World books still have some value after all) showed that the film is from Yugoslavia and listed at the invaluable (if not always accurate) imdb.com as Kicma, giving its English-language title as Backbone.

Gasp was not listed in the Academy's booklet of eligible films for 1977, so a score nomination would be even more unlikely. However, a perusal of that booklet shows that in those days, they were more liberal as to what films were eligible, including such John Holmes vehicles as The Jade Pussycat, The New Erotic Adventures of Casanova, and Tell Them Johnny Wadd Is Here.

AIRPORT '77 - John Cacavas
AUDREY ROSE - Michael Small
BLACK SUNDAY - John Williams
BOBBY DEERFIELD - Dave Grusin
A BRIDGE TOO FAR - John Addison
CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND - John Williams
EQUUS - Richard Rodney Bennett
FINAL CHAPTER - WALKING TALL - Walter Scharf
GASP - Walter Scharf
THE GAUNTLET - Jerry Fielding
THE ISLAND OF DR. MOREAU - Laurence Rosenthal
ISLANDS IN THE STREAM - Jerry Goldsmith
JOSEPH ANDREWS - John Addison
JULIA - Georges Delerue
MACARTHUR - Jerry Goldsmith
MOHAMMAD, MESSENGER OF GOD - Maurice Jarre
1900 - Ennio Morricone
PROVIDENCE - Miklos Rozsa
THE RESCUERS - Artie Butler
ROLLERCOASTER - Lalo Schifrin
THE SENTINEL - Gil Melle
THE SPY WHO LOVED ME - Marvin Hamlisch
STAR WARS - John Williams


1978

This was seemingly the last year when the Academy's Music Branch favored Jerry Goldsmith over John Williams. Goldsmith scored six movies that year, and a whopping four of them were finalists for Original Score, while Damien Omen II was a finalist in the Adaptation category, leaving only The Swarm out in the cold, where bees don't tend to do very well. Williams, on the other hand, had three scores released including the first-rate Jaws 2 and the superlative The Fury, but only the classic Superman made it into the top ten.

THE BOYS FROM BRAZIL - Jerry Goldsmith
CAPRICORN ONE - Jerry Goldsmith
COMA - Jerry Goldsmith
DAYS OF HEAVEN - Ennio Morricone
HEAVEN CAN WAIT - Dave Grusin
MAGIC - Jerry Goldsmith
MIDNIGHT EXPRESS - Giorgio Moroder
REVENGE OF THE PINK PANTHER - Henry Mancini
SUPERMAN - John Williams
WATERSHIP DOWN - Angela Morley


1979

When Variety announced the ten finalists, the article's writer expressed surprise that the scores for two big end-of-the-year special effects films, John Williams' 1941 and John Barry's The Black Hole, didn't make the cut. It would be ten years until another Williams/Spielberg score went unnominated -- Always, in 1989.

THE AMITYVILLE HORROR - Lalo Schifrin
THE CHAMP - Dave Grusin
ESCAPE FROM ALCATRAZ - Jerry Fielding
THE FRISCO KID - Frank DeVol
THE GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY - Jerry Goldsmith
A LITTLE ROMANCE - Georges Delerue
METEOR - Laurence Rosenthal
STAR TREK -- THE MOTION PICTURE - Jerry Goldsmith
10 - Henry Mancini
TIME AFTER TIME - Miklos Rozsa


After that year, the Academy gave up the finalists system, and instead began sending the entire eligible list to its Music Branch members, for them to choose the five nominees from. However, this system was not without its controversial elements. For example, due to studio oversight, Ennio Morricone's score for Once Upon a Time in America was not submitted and was thus ineligible.

Two years later, Herbie Hancock's win for Round Midnight became controversial because of the large amount of pre-existing music featured in the film. The rules were amended so that the original score would have to be the dominating music element in the film for the movie to qualify, which has been referred to unofficially as "the Hancock amendment."

This amendment had its effect the following year, when Abigail Mead's Full Metal Jacket and Alex North's The Dead were both declared ineligible -- Jacket because of the dominant presence of the film's period songs, and The Dead because of North's use of folk melodies in his score.

The category remained more or less intact until the mid-nineties, when the predominance of Alan Menken's Disney scores among Oscar® winners caused controversy, as it was felt that song scores had an unfair advantage, even though technically Menken was being honored for his incidental music, not his songs.

A new category was added in 1995, Best Original Musical or Comedy Score, but this new category caused confusion of its own, as the dividing line between a comedy score and a dramatic score can be awfully hazy -- for example, what makes The American President a comedy score and Pleasantville a dramatic score?

In the four years of the new category, only one song score actually won -- fittingly, Alan Menken's Pocahontas -- so the two categories were re-merged and the issue hasn't come up again.


NEXT: The Oscar® Finalists Part III: The Adaptation Categories. Featuring guest appearances by such faves as Williams, Goldsmith, Bernstein, Barry, Fielding, and North.

The author would like to thank Libby Wertin and the rest of the staff of the Margaret Herrick Library at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for their invaluable help, without which this article would not be possible.

"Oscar" and "Academy Awards" are registered trademarks of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

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