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ONE HUNDRED UNRELEASED SCORES

FROM THE LAST FORTY YEARS

By Scott Bettencourt

The following list does not include scores which have been released either as Oscar promos (Far Away Home, Good Will Hunting, After the Sunset et al) or composer promos (Galaxy Quest, countless John Debney and Christopher Young works).


THE ADVENTURE OF SHERLOCK HOLMES' SMARTER BROTHER - John Morris
Delightful pastiche comedy score for Gene Wilder's directorial debut, from the peak of Morris' career (20th Century Fox, 1975).

AIRPLANE - Elmer Bernstein
Bernstein's pitch-perfect parody score was only heard in snippets on a dialogue oriented soundtrack LP (Paramount, 1980).

AUSTIN POWERS IN GOLDMEMBER - George S. Clinton
Clinton added a mysterioso "Goldmember" theme and a David Arnold parody to his Powers repertoire; a short suite was featured on a Clinton composer promo, but the official soundtrack features none of the score (New Line, 2002).

BABY: SECRET OF THE LOST LEGEND - Jerry Goldsmith
Goldsmith's only dinosaur score; several cues featured on the wonderful Tribute to Jerry Goldsmith SPFM CD (Disney, 1985).

BEING THERE - Johnny Mandel
Wonderfully understated and delicately memorable music for the Oscar-winning film, with a terrific main theme (United Artists/Lorimar, 1979).

THE BETSY - John Barry
Unlike audience members, Barry was able to stay awake and write his typically melodic music for this all-star Harold Robbins soap (Allied Artists, 1978).

BEYOND THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE - Jerry Fielding
Stormy sea music and Fielding suspense, with a score roughly twice as long as Williams' for the original (Warner Bros., 1979).

THE BIG BUS - David Shire
Deft pastiche parody score from the height of the disaster era (Paramount, 1976).

THE BIG RED ONE - Dana Kaproff
Stark, Goldsmith-ian war music for the Samuel Fuller cult classic, recently expanded for re-release (United Artists, 1980).

BILL AND TED'S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE - David Newman
Lively comedy adventure music for the hit time travel comedy, Newman's second film for director Stephen Herek (Orion, 1989).

BIRDS DO IT, BEES DO IT - Gerald Fried
Fried's only Oscar nomination, for a documentary about animal sex (no, really) (Columbia, 1975).

BLACK SUNDAY - John Williams
Williams' last score before Star Wars made him John Williams; an insanely catchy main theme, exciting race-against-time music, plus a somber theme for Robert Shaw's protagonist (Paramount, 1977).

BODY DOUBLE - Pino Donaggio
DePalma's trashy porn thrillers provided one of Donaggio's liveliest and most varied scores, featuring the immortal strip-dance music (Columbia, 1984).

THE BRIDGE AT REMAGEN - Elmer Bernstein
WWII score especially popular among Bernstein fans, though reportedly the score tapes are lost. (United Artists, 1969).

BROADCAST NEWS - Bill Conti
Warm and charming romantic comedy score for James L. Brooks' Best Picture nominee (20th Century Fox, 1987).

CAPTAIN KRONOS, VAMPIRE HUNTER - Laurie Johnson
Wonderful vampire swashbuckler from Hammer, with a stirring, Herrmannesque score. Johnson re-recorded two cues for his First Men in the Moon LP, later featured on his The Avengers CD (Paramount/Hammer, 1974).

COLOSSUS: THE FORBIN PROJECT - Michel Colombier
Quirky, percussive score for one of the greatest of 70s science-fiction films (Universal, 1970).

COMPROMISING POSITIONS - Brad Fiedel
Arguably Fiedel's finest score, he found just the right tricky tone for this suburban comedy mystery (Paramount, 1985).

THE CONCORDE, AIRPORT 79 - Lalo Schifrin
The most gloriously bad of the Airport films gets a rousing score with a stirring main theme (Universal, 1979).

CONQUEROR WORM - Paul Ferris
Highly regarded score for one of the classics of British horror cinema (unfortunately, the laserdisc version featured a replacement synth score by another composer, because of music rights issues)(A.I.P., 1968).

CURSE OF THE PINK PANTHER - Henry Mancini
One of Blake Edwards' failed attempts to continue the franchise after Peter Sellers' death, but Mancini provided protagonist Ted Wass with a delightful main theme (United Artists, 1983).

CUTTER'S WAY - Jack Nitzsche
Nitzsche's finest score, for the memorable hippie noir starring Jeff Bridges and John Heard (United Artists, 1981).

DAMNATION ALLEY - Jerry Goldsmith
Goldsmith gives this post-apocalyptic sci-fi trash a much better score than it deserves (as always); most of the crucial synth "stems" are reportedly lost, which is why the selection on Varese's Jerry Goldsmith at 20th Century Fox boxed set is missing many thrilling cues (20th Century Fox, 1977).

DANGER: DIABOLIK - Ennio Morricone
Euro-comic pulp featuring a memorable Morricone theme song, "Deep Deep Down" (Paramount, 1968).

DEADLY BLESSING - James Horner
Female-centered Wes Craven horror whose early Horner score is a mix of Omen ripoff and lovely pastoral music (United Artists/Polygram, 1981).

DEATHTRAP - Johnny Mandel
John Addison-style harpsichord heavy comedy mystery music for this terrific adaptation of Ira Levin's inspired stage thriller (Warner Bros., 1982).

ELECTION - Rolfe Kent
The finest American film of the last decade gets a perfect comedy score; only a score suite was included on the song CD (Paramount, 1999).

ENDLESS NIGHT - Bernard Herrmann
One of Herrmann's most obscure works, for a British adaptation of a stand-alone Agatha Christie thriller. (British Lion, 1971).

FAHRENHEIT 451 - Bernard Herrmann
Gorgeous music for Francois Truffaut's film of Ray Bradbury's classic future novel; several cues have been re-recorded for compilations, but never the complete score (Universal, 1966).

FALLING DOWN - James Newton Howard
Howard wrote one of his best early scores for Joel Schumacher's intriguing urban drama (Warner Bros, 1993).

FAMILY PLOT - John Williams
Hitchcock's final film featured an utterly charming comedy-mystery score in the John Addison vein; so far, only Williams' end title medley has been featured on CD (Universal, 1976).

48 HRS. - James Horner
This fun urban action score was one of Horner's first big hits, but inexplicably no soundtrack was ever released, not even a song album (Paramount, 1982).

FLIGHT OF THE INTRUDER - Basil Poledouris
Stirring military adventure music for this Vietnam flyer film, John Milius' final feature so far (Paramount, 1991).

FOUR WEDDINGS AND A FUNERAL - Richard Rodney Bennett
Elegant romantic music for the popular Best Picture nominee; only a dialogue laden suite was featured on the soundtrack CD (Gramercy, 1994).

FRENZY - Ron Goodwin
Goodwin replaced Henry Mancini's rejected score for Hitchcock's penultimate film, providing propulsive suspense and a stately London theme which has been re-recorded for a few CDs (Universal, 1972).

GHOSTBUSTERS - Elmer Bernstein
Bernstein's classic fantasy-comedy-horror score for the boxoffice smash; only two score cues made it onto the soundtrack CD (Columbia, 1984).

THE GOONIES - Dave Grusin
One of Grusin's most popular scores, orchestral and rousing, with an oft-imitated main title (Warner Bros., 1985).

GREMLINS - Jerry Goldsmith
Goldsmith's first feature score for Joe Dante; only about 15 min. made it onto the "mini-disc" soundtrack, with much terrific material (especially the exciting finale) still unreleased (Warner Bros., 1984).

HAIL, HERO! - Jerome Moross
Moross' final feature score, for an early Michael Douglas vehicle, featuring that incredibly distinctive Moross sound. (National General, 1969).

THE HAND - James Horner
Horner's first major studio project for Oliver Stone's guilty pleasure horror film, with a very pretty main theme (Orion, 1981).

HANOVER STREET - John Barry
Barry's only score for director Peter Hyams (falling right between Capricorn One and Outland) was for this World War II romantic thriller (Columbia, 1979).

HELL IN THE PACIFIC - Lalo Schifrin
Effective, offbeat scoring for this John Boorman survival drama, the World War II predecessor to Enemy Mine (20th Century Fox, 1968).

IMPULSE - Paul Chihara
Underrated sci-fi horror, with a score balancing suspense and an Americana main theme (20th Century Fox, 1984).

IN COUNTRY - James Horner
Moving score for the post-Vietnam family drama, one of many fine unreleased Horner works from the 1980s (Warner Bros., 1989).

INNOCENT BLOOD - Ira Newborn
Orchestral score for John Landis' vampire horror-comedy, with a wonderfully brassy theme for the gangsters (Warner Bros., 1992).

IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU - Carter Burwell
Charming romantic comedy score for the Nicolas Cage-Bridget Fonda vehicle, but only two cues made it onto the song CD (Tri-Star, 1994).

IT'S ALIVE - Bernard Herrmann
Minor but unmistakable Herrmann, for Larry Cohen's killer baby classic. Reportedly, the score tapes are lost (Warner Bros., 1974).

THE JOURNEY OF NATTY GANN - James Horner
For this female-centered period adventure, the studio replaced a first-rate orchestral score by Elmer Bernstein with a different first-rate score by Horner (Disney, 1985).

KLUTE - Michael Small
Small's breakthrough work for the Oscar-winning thriller, subtle and memorably spooky (Warner Bros., 1971).

THE LADYKILLERS - Carter Burwell
The Coen Brothers' underrated remake of the Ealing classic, and the only Burwell-Coen score to be completely unrepresented on CD (even O Brother Where Art Thou had a For Your Consideration disc) (Touchstone, 2004).

THE LAST BOY SCOUT - Michael Kamen
The composer, producer, and writer of Lethal Weapon re-unite for this modern private eye thriller about sports gambling (Warner Bros./Geffen, 1991).

LOST IN AMERICA - Arthur B. Rubinstein
Deft score reminiscent of Ernest Gold's It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World, for Albert Brooks' frequently hilarious comedy (Warner Bros./Geffen, 1985).

THE MAN - Jerry Goldsmith
Stirring, patriotic music as the U.S. gets its first African-American president (James Earl Jones, because Morgan Freeman wasn't a star yet) (Paramount, 1972).

MARATHON MAN - Michael Small
The musical master of '70s paranoia scoring demonstrates that it is definitely not safe (Paramount, 1976)

MEN DON'T LEAVE - Thomas Newman
Underrated remake of La Vie Continue, about a mother coping with her husband's death, with an evocative score by Newman (Warner Bros./Geffen, 1990)

MISTER MOSES - John Barry
I've never seen the film, but the score has been described as Goldfinger meets Born Free, and that's good enough for me. (United Artist, 1965)

MOMMIE DEAREST - Henry Mancini
Mancini wrote a surprisingly subdued score for this camp classic Hollywood biopic, with a typically elegant main theme (Paramount, 1981).

THE MONSTER SQUAD - Bruce Broughton
One of Broughton's finest, melodic and exciting, for a film few have seen (Tri-Star, 1987).

MURDER BY DEATH - Dave Grusin
Charming comedy-mystery pastiche score with a catchy main theme (Columbia, 1976).

NATIONAL LAMPOON'S ANIMAL HOUSE - Elmer Bernstein
Comedy scoring classic which helped typecast Bernstein for nearly a decade (Universal, 1978).

'NIGHT MOTHER - David Shire
Subdued and effective score for the play adaptation, dominated by a moving solo guitar theme (Universal, 1986).

THE PARALLAX VIEW - Michael Small
Another '70s paranoid classic with a suitably unsettling score (Paramount, 1974).

THE PENITENT - Alex North
One of North's final scores, for this Mexico-set drama. Varese had planned to release the soundtrack but reportedly the tracks are lost (Cineworld, 1988).

PHENOMENON - Thomas Newman
Newman wrote a typically evocative and discreet score for this summer hit, but the soundtrack album features only one score cue (Touchstone, 1996).

PLAYERS - Jerry Goldsmith
Goldsmith's nearly forgotten romantic score, written in the midst of Alien and Star Trek, with a thrilling fanfare for Wimbledon (Paramount, 1979)

PLENTY - Bruce Smeaton
Brief but extremely effective score for Fred Schepisi's superbly acted film of David Hare's play (20th Century Fox, 1985)

THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE - Michael Small
One of Small's finest, with an especially strong end title (Paramount, 1981).

THE PRISONER OF ZENDA - Henry Mancini
Delightful comedy score for the Peter Sellers remake of the swashbuckling classic; Mancini re-recorded a few cues for his excellent Mancini in Surround CD (Universal, 1979)

THE PRIVATE LIFE OF SHERLOCK HOLMES - Miklos Rozsa
Gorgeous Rozsa score for the Billy Wilder film which was in turn inspired by one of Rozsa's classical works; unfortunately, the score tracks are reportedly lost (United Artists, 1970).

QUEEN OF HEARTS - Michael Convertino
Lovely orchestral score for this too little seen English film, Jon Amiel's feature directing debut (Cinecom, 1989).

RACHEL, RACHEL - Jerome Moross
One of Moross' final scores, for the Paul Newman-directed Best Picture nominee (Warner Bros., 1968).

THE RESCUE - Bruce Broughton
Rousing score for a forgotten juvenile adventure (Disney, 1988).

RESURRECTION - Maurice Jarre
One of Jarre's best scores of the '80s, with a soaring main theme, for the Oscar-nominated spiritual drama (Universal, 1980).

THE SATAN BUG - Jerry Goldsmith
A dazzling main title and exciting Goldsmith action music for this Alistair MacLean bio-thriller; alas, most of the score tapes are reportedly lost (United Artists, 1965).

SATURN 3 - Elmer Bernstein
Fascinatingly weird score for Stanley Donen's trashy sci-fi horror film; the deleted love theme ended up as Taarna's theme for Heavy Metal. (AFD/ITC, 1980)

SECONDS - Jerry Goldsmith
Chilling organ-dominated score for John Frankenheimer's stylish sci-fi drama (Paramount, 1966).

THE SENDER - Trevor Jones
Underrated, little seen supernatural thriller featuring an evocative score reminiscent of the choral passages from The Dark Crystal (Paramount, 1982).

SEVEN - Howard Shore
Possibly Shore's most ominous and unrelenting score, not an easy listen but extremely powerful. The soundtrack CD featured a lengthy suite, but we need more more more (New Line, 1995).

SHAFT - David Arnold
Arnold's most sheerly enjoyable score, updating the great '70s blaxploitation tradition (Paramount, 2000).

SHANKS - Alex North
North earned an Oscar-nomination for William Castle's offbeat horror-fantasy, his score reworking parts of his rejected 2001 music. (Paramount, 1974)

SHOOT TO KILL - John Scott
Ignore the '80s synth drams and enjoy Scott's dazzling main theme for this outdoor adventure film, especially the thrilling end title. (Touchstone, 1988)

SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES - James Horner
Delerue's lyrical music was rejected and replaced by Horner's score (which author Ray Bradbury loved), mixing a Darth Vader-ish main theme with lovely pastoral scoring (Disney, 1983).

THE SPLIT - Quincy Jones
Fun and funky music for the follow-up to Point Blank, with Jim Brown and Gene Hackman (MGM, 1968).

THE STAR CHAMBER - Michael Small
Small brings his classic paranoia scoring into the '80s with this Peter Hyams thriller, with an especially fine main theme (20th Century Fox, 1983).

STRANGE INVADERS - John Addison
Addison seemed an inexplicable choice for this homage to '50s sci-fi but wrote a delightful score with a stirring finale (Orion, 1983).

THE SUGARLAND EXPRESS - John Williams
The first Spielberg-Williams collaboration, with a twangy, evocative main theme (Universal, 1974)

TELEFON - Lalo Schifrin
Classic Schifrin-style suspense with a Russian flavor for this Don Siegel directed thriller (MGM, 1977).

TESTAMENT - James Horner
Moving and restrained music for the Oscar-nominated drama about a suburban family coping with the aftermath of nuclear war (Paramount, 1983).

THAT CHAMPIONSHIP SEASON - Bill Conti
One of Conti's best, for the film of Jason Miller's Pulitzer Prize winning drama (Cannon, 1982).

THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLLIE - Elmer Bernstein
Bernstein's only Oscar, for the Julie Andrews musical comedy (Universal, 1967).

TOM HORN - Ernest Gold
Gold's last major score for the big screen, brooding Western music for the downbeat biopic starring Steve McQueen. (Warner Bros., 1980).

THE VALLEY OF GWANGI - Jerome Moross
Unlike Big Country fans, stop motion fans discovered Moross through this wonderful Western fantasy adventure score; a suite was re-recorded for a Silva compilation, and alas the original tracks are reputedly lost. (Warner Bros. 1969)

THE VANISHING - Jerry Goldsmith
Underrated suspense score with an elegant main theme, for this remake of the Dutch thriller. A healthy selection was included on the Jerry Goldsmith at 20th Century Fox boxed set. (20th Century Fox, 1993)

THE VERDICT - Johnny Mandel
Somber, brooding score with liturgical overtones for Sidney Lumet's Oscar-nominated courtroom drama (20th Century Fox, 1982).

VICTORY - Bill Conti
One of Conti's most rousing scores, for this Great Soccer Escape directed by John Huston (Paramount, 1981).

VOLUNTEERS - James Horner
Largely forgotten Tom Hanks comedy directed by Nicholas Meyer, with a rousing main theme (Tri-Star, 1985).

WAIT UNTIL DARK - Henry Mancini
Classic '60s suspense film with an eerie main theme; sadly, reportedly the tapes are lost (Warner Bros., 1967)

THE WAR OF THE ROSES - David Newman
Director Danny DeVito's biggest hit featured a deft dark comedy score from his perennial collaborator (20th Century Fox, 1991).

WOLFEN - James Horner
When Craig Safan's somber score was thrown out, Horner supplied a warm, melodic and exciting replacement (Orion, 1981).

YOUNG GUNS II - Alan Silvestri
Silvestri followed Back to the Future Part III with this surprisingly effective mixture of orchestral and rock elements (20th Century Fox, 1990).


Alas, as far as I know, none of these hundred scores are being planned as soundtracks by Film Score Monthly, but if it's any consolation, the following scores from the last four decades all received their first soundtrack release in just the last three years:

THE ABOMINABLE DR. PHIBES - Basil Kirchin
ALIEN NATION - Jerry Goldsmith
THE APPOINTMENT - Michel Legrand, John Barry, Don Walker, Stu Phillips
BIG - Howard Shore
BIG WEDNESDAY - Basil Poledouris
BRANNIGAN - Dominic Frontiere
THE BRAVE LITTLE TOASTER - David Newman
BRING ME THE HEAD OF ALFREDO GARCIA - Jerry Fielding
BRUBAKER - Lalo Schifrin
THE BUSY BODY - Vic Mizzy
CAVEMAN - Lalo Schifrin
COMMANDO - James Horner
THE CUTTING EDGE - Patrick Williams
DEMON SEED - Jerry Fielding
DIRTY HARRY - Lalo Schifrin
FUTUREWORLD - Fred Karlin
THE GHOST AND MR. CHICKEN - Vic Mizzy
THE GREEN BERETS - Miklos Rozsa
HEART LIKE A WHEEL - Laurence Rosenthal
THE HELLSTROM CHRONICLE - Lalo Schifrin
JUDGMENT NIGHT - Alan Silvestri
LASERBLAST - Richard Band, Joel Goldsmith
LAWMAN - Jerry Fielding
LOCH NESS - Trevor Jones
LOCK UP - Bill Conti
THE LONG GOODBYE - John Williams
MAGIC - Jerry Goldsmith
MAGNUM FORCE - Lalo Schifrin
THE MAN WHO HAUNTED HIMSELF - Michael J. Lewis
McQ - Elmer Bernstein
MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET - Bruce Broughton
MOSQUITO SQUADRON - Frank Cordell
NARROW MARGIN - Bruce Broughton
92 IN THE SHADE - Michael J. Lewis
OPERATION CROSSBOW - Ron Goodwin
THE PACKAGE - James Newton Howard
PREDATOR - Alan Silvestri
THE PRODIGAL - Bruce Broughton
7 WOMEN - Elmer Bernstein
SOYLENT GREEN - Fred Myrow
SPACEHUNTER: ADVENTURES IN THE FORBIDDEN ZONE - Elmer Bernstein
THE SPIRIT IS WILLING - Vic Mizzy
STRIPES - Elmer Bernstein
SUBMARINE X-1 - Ron Goodwin
THX-1138 - Lalo Schifrin
TIMELINE - Jerry Goldsmith
THE UNSAID - Don Davis
THE WHITE BUFFALO - John Barry
THE YAKUZA - Dave Grusin

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