Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 9:00 AM   
 By:   maritereh   (Member)

Hello guys!

I could really use your help! As I'm sure you know, Maestro Ennio Morricone will be in Mexico City next week and I'll have the chance to make an interview. I'm a huge fan and I already prepared some questions, but I know that you're experts on the subject and probably you'll have better ideas on this.
So, if you had the chance to ask him something, what would it be? Could you share some thoughts with me?

I'll later post his answers of course!

Thanks!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 9:25 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

Mission to Mars - (much belittled movie-mostly deserves it)

Uh, why did you take that project?
What is with the organ (even though I like it)
What did you think of the movie?
How is it working with director Brian DePalma, you scored three movies with him?



 
 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 9:27 AM   
 By:   keky   (Member)

I would ask where all those melodies come from (emotions, impressions, ideas?) ; how it is possible that after 50 years he can still come up with new melodies, new sounds.

Good luck with the interview, you are a very lucky person! Looking forward to the answers, of course.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 9:27 AM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)

Wow! Lucky you!

Just off the top of my head, I'd ask some broad questions about how he chooses his projects perhaps recent ones compared to when he first started out. What other composers he may have been influenced by and why. What are his thoughts or processes before he starts composing. Favorite Directors he's worked with and special experiences working with them. What are some of his own favorite scores and why and finally if he has other film composers he admires and/or their works and why.

BTW I'm no expert like plenty of the others you refer to around here so I hope they don't slam me too hard if these questions sound lame.

Lastly I did write a review for my site on a Morricone concert he gave here in Perth (Australia) you might enjoy:

http://thecinemacafe.com/the-cinema-treasure-hunter?category=Treasured%20Appearances

(Please scroll down to the first of the "Treasured Appearances")

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 9:29 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

You haven't worked outside of Italy in a long while, have you not had offers? Or are they for films you have no interest in?

Also you wrote a song for Quentin Tarantino in his last film, is that dialogue still continuing?

BTW His new book is challenging.

( also maritereh, your gorgeous)

 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 9:31 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

Mission to Mars - (much belittled movie-mostly deserves it)

Uh, why did you take that project?
What is with the organ (even though I like it)
What did you think of the movie?
How is it working with director Brian DePalma, you scored three movies with him?


The score for that movie was one of my favorite scores that year and has since become one of my favorite Morricone scores. It is also one of the scores that plays very well on album the way it is and is excellently sequenced, not chronological. For listening purposes, I prefer the order of cues Morricone came up with for the original soundtrack release. There is a real musical and narrative flow to the album, that stands very well on its own.

 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 9:38 AM   
 By:   Ester   (Member)

Qué suerte la tuya, Maritereh ! wink I'm sure I could come up with other more relevant questions but right now I wonder why Il Maestro has always seemed to have very little interest in synth. music including during its golden age (mid 70s-->80s) Beware : I'm not complaining at all about it and actually you could even thank him in my name for not succumbing to the sirens' synth song. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 10:42 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

Mission to Mars - (much belittled movie-mostly deserves it)

Uh, why did you take that project?
What is with the organ (even though I like it)
What did you think of the movie?
How is it working with director Brian DePalma, you scored three movies with him?


The score for that movie was one of my favorite scores that year and has since become one of my favorite Morricone scores. It is also one of the scores that plays very well on album the way it is and is excellently sequenced, not chronological. For listening purposes, I prefer the order of cues Morricone came up with for the original soundtrack release. There is a real musical and narrative flow to the album, that stands very well on its own.


Hey Nicolai

Me too, the score far surpasses the film. And I love that organ.
Ado

 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 11:45 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Ask him about eclecticism. How did his 'pop' roots square with his obviously total mastery of the more tradifional post-impressionistic, almost concert style used in films like 'Hamlet' etc..

And does he feel that the synthesis between the Italian 'operatic' approach of Leone and conventional film music that he pioneered has ever been really assimilated outside Italy? Does he see himself as a one-off, or part of a line of development, and if the latter, where has that line gone now?

And how does he keep his inspiration and creative flows fresh after so many films?


Which lingo will you interview him in, by the way?

 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 11:52 AM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

What are some of your favorite pieces of music of all time?

What do you remember about scoring Malick's Days Of Heaven? Do you remember the direction you were given on that project?

(And I want to think of a question about the score to Red Sonja but I'm at a loss at how to phrase it)

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 12:03 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I don't have any particular question, but I just wanted to congratulate you on your opportunity to interview the maestro! I'm envious, especially since he rarely gives them. I was just turned down by John Williams for the second time, so I know how difficult it is with the ol' legends these days.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 1:23 PM   
 By:   mrchriswell   (Member)

I'm curious about what a guy who scores 400 films turns down. I figure he must have had U.S. offers since Mission to Mars (which is a wonderful score, and I like the movie too). Did his experience with What Dreams May Come influence his decision to withdraw from Hollywood? Will we see that unused score officially released?

 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 1:28 PM   
 By:   maritereh   (Member)

Thanks a lot for all your suggestions! I'll let you know who this goes.

WILLIAMDMCCRUM: I'm preparing all the questions in english, but a colleague who speaks perfect italian will help me with translation, because he only grants interviews in italian.

Thor: I know, it's amazing. I've also made two requests for John Williams and haven't had any luck either frown

 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 1:31 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

The Thing

Who actually wrote and performed the main theme? And what was it like collaborating with Carpenter who is known for doing his own scores?

 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2014 - 1:45 PM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Who does he regard as a modern day Sergio Leone?

He has recently expressed he wanted to do more sci-fi, what are some of the movies he has enjoyed within the genre?

Good luck with the interview. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2014 - 7:17 AM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

A couple of questions I would ask. How do you feel and how do you respond when someone comes up to you and says in all earnest, You are one of the greatest composers of the modern era?-question 2- Although it seems to be important to you from your work. How important do you feel the melodic line is for a film score?

 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2014 - 7:41 AM   
 By:   Juanki   (Member)

Mr. Morricone, what do you think about nowadays' film music?

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2014 - 8:30 AM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Good question but remember in Ennio's early days his modern technique was condemned by many of that era till years later. Page Cook I think right till the end. Being the type of diverse minded composer he is, he might not be to quick to condemned things that are different. But it would be a good question.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2014 - 8:43 AM   
 By:   Ludwig van   (Member)

I would ask what he feels are some of the most effective cues he's written, where the merger of music and film was as nearly perfect as he feels it could be.

It's always interesting to know what a film composer feels about his or her own music in relation to the films themselves. And we may just be surprised by what he would answer...

 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2014 - 8:48 AM   
 By:   Mr Greg   (Member)

I'd love to know what he thinks of the Spaghetti Western Orchestra and has he been to any of their shows recently?

For anyone unaware, the SWO only play Ennio Morricone music, and are fantastic musicians and theatre performers....I highly recommend catching some of their stuff on YouTube.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.