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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: Klute/All the President’s Men
 
 Posted:   Sep 6, 2009 - 5:18 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

What a great two-fer! It gives me them early-70s-paranoia- minimalist-blues, baby! This stuff is Noir...or maybe just two excellent mysteries.

Less is more.

I initially bought this for KLUTE and while it has made me a Michael Small admirer, it's Shire's effort that has me hooked. Both scores are hushed, spare affairs with surprisingly catchy themes. The underscore perfectly captures the atmosphere of the unravelling mystery. I hope FSM can someday follow this release up with The Parallax View and Marathon Man...

I know they're watching me and the other four people who bought this score. They also know I purchased my copy from Intrada. It was a "third-rate online transaction." wink

Just follow the money.

 
 Posted:   Sep 6, 2009 - 10:11 AM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

I bough this double header for "Klute" that I already knew but FSM enhanced it so brilliantly that it became a brand new experience.
The orchestration is fascinating, just listen closely to Small's use of instrument.
The killer motif ranks as one of the best with Scorpio from "Dirty Harry": I mean the obsessive female voices.
http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/store/MP3/1016/04_Phone_Call_Play_Back.mp3

The first instrument that starts the "Main Title" always remind me Billy Goldenberg's creepy 70's Universal sound.

"Klute" is again a very versalite and composite score that combines many influences and references from chamber music, modernist classical music, traditional Indian music, psyche rock music, funk, jazz ... "Klute" is a concept score.
Two themes (the love, the killer) dominate and are repeated with different arrangements all the way.

 
 Posted:   Sep 6, 2009 - 10:42 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

KLUTE was my introduction to Michael Small--at least *this* style of him, because his 1980s work didn't make any impact on me. Now, hearing how he has this conspiracy/thriller sound makes him much more interesting.

I love spare, dissonant piano--that "Chamber Music" sound you mention...I've never even seen KLUTE--it probably doesn't get played on TV all that much.

I guess by the usual lack of response, that this was another score that Lukas "had to" do, and I'm grateful he did.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 6, 2009 - 11:15 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

I did buy this CD, but never really fell in love with it.
Klute is my favourite of the two, but it isn't amongst my personal faves of Small.
It's quietly effective, and spooky, but doesn't get too many repeat plays from me.
Shire's score has a great main theme (which I already had on the Shire Film Music Promo CD) but becomes tiresome over the whole CD.
No complaints about it getting released, but I know I would have been happier with Parallax View, Audrey Rose or Postman Always Rings Twice.

 
 Posted:   Sep 6, 2009 - 1:57 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I did buy this CD, but never really fell in love with it.
Klute is my favourite of the two, but it isn't amongst my personal faves of Small.
It's quietly effective, and spooky, but doesn't get too many repeat plays from me.
Shire's score has a great main theme (which I already had on the Shire Film Music Promo CD) but becomes tiresome over the whole CD.


How do you think they work within the films themselves?

 
 Posted:   Sep 6, 2009 - 10:49 PM   
 By:   Ag^Janus   (Member)

A publication with MARATHON MAN and THE PARALLAX VIEW would be an exciting Michael Small situation. Those scores are probably considered gems and awaiting their turn amongst a lot of other material.

 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2009 - 4:11 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

A publication with MARATHON MAN and THE PARALLAX VIEW would be an exciting Michael Small situation. Those scores are probably considered gems and awaiting their turn amongst a lot of other material.

Yes, they're quickly entering "Holy Grail" status ( aka "order, anticipate, shelve, and forget" wink).

If Paranoia was your "bag", Small and Shire were the ones to call. If they made films like that today, who would be the likely composer? Don't answer that, because I'd be afraid to know the awful truth...

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2009 - 5:47 AM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)

I liked KLUTE (and I agree wholeheartedly with Thomas that it does occasionally have that '70's-Billy Goldenberg- [and others]-at-Universal' sort of feeling). I do think that it got a bit repetitive in parts of the CD, but it worked brilliantly in the film and that's what counts.

Much though I admire Mr Shire, outside of some snippets of ALL THE PRESIDENTS MEN, I found it rather a tough listen. The music didn't really 'engage' me, I suppose. Then again, in the movie I don't think that it would have been intended to.

 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2009 - 6:55 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I liked KLUTE (and I agree wholeheartedly with Thomas that it does occasionally have that '70's-Billy Goldenberg- (and others)-at-Universal' sort of feeling). I do think that it got a bit repetitive in parts of the CD, but it worked brilliantly in the film and that's what counts.

Much though I admire Mr Shire, outside of some snippets of ALL THE PRESIDENTS MEN, I found it rather a tough listen. The music didn't really 'engage' me, I suppose. Then again, in the movie I don't think that it would have been intended to.


Then it's no coincidence that this score is "hitting the spot", because I've been watching the first season of COLUMBO all weekend, so I have Billy G. and the like on the brain! I also can say that my taste in film and TV music has leaned heavily towards the abstract, atonal, and dissonant style so popular in the late-sixties/early-seventies. I've enjoyed jazz from that period for decades now, so perhaps I'm overdue in fully immersing myself in music like this.

I'm a bit embarrassed that it took me nearly two years to finally "pull the trigger" on this release, but that's a New York Minute compared to the seven years it took me to purchase, love, and treasure POINT BLANK/THE OUTFIT. I'll miss obsessively putting it in and taking it out of my SAE shopping cart, though! wink

I really gotta stop living on Mayberry time...

 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2009 - 9:59 AM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

I liked KLUTE (and I agree wholeheartedly with Thomas that it does occasionally have that '70's-Billy Goldenberg- (and others)-at-Universal' sort of feeling). I do think that it got a bit repetitive in parts of the CD, but it worked brilliantly in the film and that's what counts.



The repetitive aspect is done on purpose because the score, as I wrote above, consisted on two themes (the love, the killer) executed with different arrangements. In the context of the film, it is designed to show the obsessive nature of two characters: the killer in the shadow and the hooker.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2009 - 11:05 AM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)


The repetitive aspect is done on purpose because the score, as I wrote above, consisted on two themes (the love, the killer) executed with different arrangements. In the context of the film, it is designed to show the obsessive nature of two characters: the killer in the shadow and the hooker.


Mmmm. Interesting point. I'll have to give KLUTE a listen with the above in mind; I haven't heard it for a while. Not sure that I'll be doing the same with ATPM though.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2009 - 11:45 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)



...I do think that it got a bit repetitive in parts of the CD, but it worked brilliantly in the film and that's what counts.



When I'm listening to a CD, I could care less how the music worked in the film. If it works great in the film but is unlistenable at home on it's own, I have no interest.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2009 - 12:42 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

"How do you think they work within the films themselves?"

To be honest Jim, I haven't re-watched the films since I first viewed them in the eighties!
So getting the scores on CD was very much like listening to them without much memory association. I know Shire's ATPM score acts more like a pulse for the film anyway (similar to the way Peter Hyams generally likes his films scored).
I must try to catch Klute when it gets a reshow on telly. I figure that score could grow in appreciation when I renew my aquaintance with the film. Who knows.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2009 - 12:51 PM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)



When I'm listening to a CD, I could care less how the music worked in the film. If it works great in the film but is unlistenable at home on it's own, I have no interest.



Yes, of course you're right. What I meant is that the composers initial task is to serve the needs of the film, rather than a soundtrack album.

But it's nice to satisfy both ends of the spectrum smile

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2009 - 12:54 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)



Yes, of course you're right. What I meant is that the composers initial task is to serve the needs of the film, rather than a soundtrack album.

But it's nice to satisfy both ends of the spectrum smile


I hear what you're saying.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2009 - 4:30 PM   
 By:   Doctor Plesman   (Member)


I know they're watching me and the other four people who bought this score.


Four plus one people? Didn't they watch me too? Make that six ;-)

 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2009 - 6:16 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)



When I'm listening to a CD, I could care less how the music worked in the film. If it works great in the film but is unlistenable at home on it's own, I have no interest.



Yes, of course you're right. What I meant is that the composers initial task is to serve the needs of the film, rather than a soundtrack album.

But it's nice to satisfy both ends of the spectrum smile


One could program the disc to play the pertinent highlights for "maximum listenability." IMO it's not repetitious at all, at least when the themes are that good--and memorable.

Though it's heresy to say so in these boards, it'd be interesting to hear the score as re-recorded circa 1971 with Small providing funkier versions of his compositions. In fact, some of the source cues ("I Want to Speak to You") were done with an album in mind. They have that "jammy" feel to them.

 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2009 - 2:50 AM   
 By:   wayoutwest   (Member)

Klute is one of my Favorite Scores but did not really warm to FSM sequencing much pre fair the Original LP sequencing an Incredible Listening Experience

 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2009 - 7:43 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Klute is one of my Favorite Scores but did not really warm to FSM sequencing much pre fair the Original LP sequencing an Incredible Listening Experience

I've yet to try that.

Strange that KLUTE was so popular among the filmmakers and musicians that it didn't receive an official release. Well, stranger things have happened.

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2009 - 1:04 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Well, I'm glad that *this* score wasn't rejected! And IMO it's infinitely superior to the one that was rejected at decade's end... Otherwise, the two years I waited to get the thing would've cost me hundreds!


Hundreds! big grin

 
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