Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2012 - 4:31 PM   
 By:   Senn555   (Member)

INTRADA
Announces:



THE LAST HARD MEN
Composed and Conductd by LEONARD ROSENMAN
Composed by JERRY GOLDSMITH, Conducted by LIONEL NEWMAN
INTRADA Special Collection Vol. 224

When collectors of movie music hear the names Leonard Rosenman and Jerry Goldsmith uttered together, two well-known feature film series might come to mind: Planet of the Apes and Star Trek. In each case, Goldsmith scored the original while Rosenman joined the series for a sequel. In between these two franchise associations came a relative obscurity that also connects the two, the 1976 western The Last Hard Men, for which Rosenman’s original score was replaced with music by Goldsmith.

Rosenman was simply asked to provide an avant-garde score and was left without further input from the film's creators. The score is, as observed by conductor and Rosenman preservationist Deniz Cordell, “uncompromising in its depiction of the psychological shadings of the story it accompanies. Leonard’s music brings to life an arid, harsh, jagged and unsympathetic West, devoid of sentimentality or nostalgic yearning for the past that characterizes other westerns. It’s also a score that’s emblematic of the direction his film music was continuing to evolve in, emphasizing rhythmic stabs to create jeopardy, alternating harmonic patterns to heighten tension and using smaller melodic kernels as anchors for the overall musico-narrative arc.”

The rejection started with just one scene. Rosenman insisted on leaving a rape scene unscored, but the film makers felt the scene fell flat so they pulled a cue for Goldsmith's Morituri to cover it. After hearing the result, the producers felt the music could be further improved upon, resulting in the Rosenman score being removed and replaced with Goldsmith cues from Stagecoach, 100 Rifles, and Rio Conchos. These cues were then rerecorded under the baton of Lionel Newman, and all but one were left unused in favor of the original soundtrack recordings. This premiere release features the complete score Rosenman sourced from a three-track split mono element and mixed reasonably for stereo for this release and all the rerecorded Goldsmith material.

Based on the 1971 novel Gun Down by Brian Garfield, the author of Death Wish, The Last Hard Men tells of former territorial police captain Sam Burgade (Charlton Heston), who comes out of retirement to pursue escaped half-Indian convict Zach Provo (James Coburn). Burgade had incarcerated Provo years earlier and Provo has now kidnapped Burgade’s daughter Susan (Barbara Hershey) in a quest for revenge.

INTRADA Special Collection Vol. 224
Retail Price: $19.99
Available Now
For track listing and sound samples, please visit
http://store.intrada.com/s.nl/it.A/id.7850/.f

 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2012 - 4:49 PM   
 By:   Tom Servo   (Member)

Well, this is a welcome surprise.

 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2012 - 4:52 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

This has to be some kind of a first in soundtrack CDs, doesn't it?

It's sort of like releasing all the "Freud" cues used in "Alien," in a way -- but you get [1] an interesting unused Rosenman score and [2] a new re-recording of "Goldsmith Western Highlights"! Pretty cool.

 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2012 - 4:58 PM   
 By:   Tom Servo   (Member)

Wow, I really dig those Rosenman tracks from this score, just what I like to hear from his music, and having the re-recorded Goldsmith cues, conducted by frikkin' Lionel Newman no less, is an absolute treat.

 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2012 - 5:05 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

I'm hearing little ideas, nuggets, and orchestration in this that later found their way into at least two scores I recognize so far, "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home" and "Keeper of the City".

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2012 - 5:06 PM   
 By:   zooba   (Member)

Yes, the Newman re-recorded Goldsmith cues sound wonderful. So crisp and clean and a slightly new take and realization of the material. Totally cool!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2012 - 7:33 PM   
 By:   CindyLover   (Member)

When collectors of movie music hear the names Leonard Rosenman and Jerry Goldsmith uttered together, two well-known feature film series might come to mind: Planet of the Apes and Star Trek. In each case, Goldsmith scored the original while Rosenman joined the series for a sequel.

Goldsmith also did at least one sequel in each case, though we were denied Rosenman getting the chance to score, say, Uhura doing a fan dance or Iman morphing into William Shatner.

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2012 - 12:52 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

being a hige James Coburn fan i have always wanted to see this film
but
everyone who has seen it has told me it is a total disaster!

your thoughts,,,,,
bruce

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2012 - 1:42 PM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

Just curious--are any of the re recordings of the Goldsmith works in any way different than the ones on the original sound tracks?

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2012 - 3:11 PM   
 By:   James MacMillan   (Member)

being a hige James Coburn fan i have always wanted to see this film
but
everyone who has seen it has told me it is a total disaster!

your thoughts,,,,,
bruce



It's a horrible film. I've never minded violence in films when it's called for, but in this instance it was just gratuitous.

(I still wanna hear the music, especially Lenny's discarded stuff...)

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2012 - 3:49 PM   
 By:   jonathan_little   (Member)

Wow, Lionel Newman's recordings of Goldsmith's 100 Rifles tracks sure sound messy. I always thought the OST performance was a little sloppy, but I have new found respect for it after hearing that garbage.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2012 - 9:09 AM   
 By:   Scott Atkins   (Member)

The Last Hard Men is on DVD as a double feature disc that includes Skyriders which also features Coburn.

As to the quality of The Last Hard Men I would like to quote a review of the film from the site DVDFile: "This is a film born of simplicity. It is simply simple plot, simple action, simple fun. Sometimes a person just wants vanilla ice cream, and what better way to enjoy vanilla than with Heston & Coburn, and a nice bit of Barbara Hershey on top."

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2012 - 9:16 AM   
 By:   Eugene Iemola   (Member)

Can anyone tell me if Mr. Rosenman uses that tonal pyramid-thingy (that's sort of his "trademark") in his score?

 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2012 - 1:38 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Can anyone tell me if Mr. Rosenman uses that tonal pyramid-thingy (that's sort of his "trademark") in his score?

do you really hafta ask?

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2012 - 3:11 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

It never gets tiresome to giggle at this film's title. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 13, 2012 - 5:04 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

being a hige James Coburn fan i have always wanted to see this film
but
everyone who has seen it has told me it is a total disaster!

your thoughts,,,,,
bruce



Dont you listen to em Bruce, it was okay.
Certainly not the worst western Ive seen.
Ageing sheriff, revenge, turn of the century modernisation creeping into western life, - popular themes from the late sixties onwards but it was watchable enough.

I dont recall it being gratuitiously violent either. I think it was an X film in England and there was a fairly gruesome rape scene but it was hardly straw dogs. Just an x-rated adult western.

And regardless of whether Jerry's clips were 100 rifles or whatever, it was still good quality Jerry and were more than adequate for the film's scenes. It didnt pull me out of the film in the annoying way Tarantino's clips do from previous Morricone Italian westerns.

I just dont get this "group-think" that says it was awful, terrible, worst, etc etc. Check it out and judge for yourself.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 13, 2012 - 5:33 AM   
 By:   soundtracksi   (Member)

Hi
I remember seeing it in the Uk when it came out, at the i think LONDON PAVILION or may have been the realto in the square
i enjoyed it being into action and revenge movies of the time and a good cast, and seeing Brian Garfield had written it it was no way going to be seven brides and you could not sneeze with out hitting a cinema showing a kung fu or shooting picture,
O'h he good old day's
i did find a dvd of it widescreen in germany of late good to see it again,
time has toned it down, still worth seeing

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 13, 2012 - 5:48 AM   
 By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)

Hi
I remember seeing it in the Uk when it came out, at the i think LONDON PAVILION or may have been the realto in the square


Actually it was shown at the Carlton which showed all first run Fox films. The London Pavilion was a United Artists cinema. I remember enjoying the film but the climax was certainly surprisingly violent for what was otherwise a fairly traditional western.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 13, 2012 - 7:04 AM   
 By:   soundtracksi   (Member)

Hi
I remember seeing it in the Uk when it came out, at the i think LONDON PAVILION or may have been the realto in the square


Actually it was shown at the Carlton which showed all first run Fox films. The London Pavilion was a United Artists cinema. I remember enjoying the film but the climax was certainly surprisingly violent for what was otherwise a fairly traditional western.


AH yes that's it the carlton thanks for that i can put that to bed in my mind
so It mus have been Go tell the spartens arond that time i see at the Pavilion
sorry to pull of topic

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 15, 2012 - 5:07 PM   
 By:   RM Eastman   (Member)

The Rosenman score leaves a lot to be desired, a total bore, and not an iota of western feel or Americana. The Goldsmith re-recordings are a pure delight, and the reason I bought this CD.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.