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 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 5:00 PM   
 By:   Senn555   (Member)

INTRADA
Announces:



CROMWELL
Composed and Conducted by FRANK CORDELL
INTRADA Special Collection Vol. 228


In 1970, following the lead of their popular 1968 soundtrack for Franco Zeffirelli’s Romeo and Juliet, Capitol issued a 51-minute soundtrack LP of dialogue highlights from Columbia's Cromwell. Other than mere snippets of music contained within the dialogue tracks on Capitol’s album, Cordell’s dynamic and powerful score was never singled out for its own release. Now Intrada presents a 2-CD set containing the premiere of the complete original score in magnificent stereo on one disc and the original LP presentation on the second. Source masters for the scoring sessions were numerous ¼? 7½ ips two-track rolls of tape, stored for 40-plus years in the EMI Capitol vaults.

Cordell’s score was actually much longer than what appeared in the 140-minute picture. Not only had he composed “Overture” and “Intermission” sequences, but also several sequences subsequently dropped from the final production. These are all included on the CD. The original film structure places the action in the first half of the movie, with exciting sequences of soldiers and battle, all leading to the end of Act I. The second half stresses verbal confrontations between the two protagonists, the lengthy trial and the execution of King Charles. As such, Cordell necessarily puts his fanfares and battle music in the first half, and then writes more deliberate, involved dramatic underscoring for the second half.

The film opens in 1640. Oliver Cromwell (Richard Harris), a disillusioned Puritan farmer and former parliamentarian, plans to leave for America. Friends persuade him to return to Parliament and fight the flagrant disregard of justice displayed by King Charles I (Alec Guinness). Urged on by his queen (Dorothy Tutin) and Lord Strafford (Patrick Wymark), Charles demands money from Parliament to finance his war against Scottish rebels, but the assembly agrees only on condition that the king acknowledges their power. They also call for the execution of Strafford. The king complies, but later regrets his decision and sends soldiers to shut down Parliament. This confrontation leads to civil war.

INTRADA Special Collection Vol. 228
Retail Price: $24.99
Available Now
For track listing and sound samples, please visit
http://store.intrada.com/s.nl/it.A/id.7957/.f

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 5:13 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Incredible! One I never thought we'd see, and one of my favorites. The new cover is OK, but I love that original.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 5:18 PM   
 By:   paul rossen   (Member)

Am I off base to say that there is a major Alex North influence here?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 5:19 PM   
 By:   paul rossen   (Member)

duplicate

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 5:20 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Not only had he composed “Overture” and “Intermission” sequences, but also several sequences subsequently dropped from the final production.

No separate "Overture" appears in the track listing--just an "Intermission Overture."

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 5:25 PM   
 By:   paul rossen   (Member)

Not only had he composed “Overture” and “Intermission” sequences, but also several sequences subsequently dropped from the final production.

No separate "Overture" appears in the track listing--just an "Intermission Overture."


Many films had the same music for 'Overture' and 'Entr'acte'. Perhaps this is the case here as well....

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 5:31 PM   
 By:   roadshowfan   (Member)

INTRADA
Announces:



CROMWELL
Composed and Conducted by FRANK CORDELL
INTRADA Special Collection Vol. 228


In 1970, following the lead of their popular 1968 soundtrack for Franco Zeffirelli’s Romeo and Juliet, Capitol issued a 51-minute soundtrack LP of dialogue highlights from Columbia's Cromwell. Other than mere snippets of music contained within the dialogue tracks on Capitol’s album, Cordell’s dynamic and powerful score was never singled out for its own release. Now Intrada presents a 2-CD set containing the premiere of the complete original score in magnificent stereo on one disc and the original LP presentation on the second. Source masters for the scoring sessions were numerous ¼? 7½ ips two-track rolls of tape, stored for 40-plus years in the EMI Capitol vaults.

Cordell’s score was actually much longer than what appeared in the 140-minute picture. Not only had he composed “Overture” and “Intermission” sequences, but also several sequences subsequently dropped from the final production. These are all included on the CD. The original film structure places the action in the first half of the movie, with exciting sequences of soldiers and battle, all leading to the end of Act I. The second half stresses verbal confrontations between the two protagonists, the lengthy trial and the execution of King Charles. As such, Cordell necessarily puts his fanfares and battle music in the first half, and then writes more deliberate, involved dramatic underscoring for the second half.

The film opens in 1640. Oliver Cromwell (Richard Harris), a disillusioned Puritan farmer and former parliamentarian, plans to leave for America. Friends persuade him to return to Parliament and fight the flagrant disregard of justice displayed by King Charles I (Alec Guinness). Urged on by his queen (Dorothy Tutin) and Lord Strafford (Patrick Wymark), Charles demands money from Parliament to finance his war against Scottish rebels, but the assembly agrees only on condition that the king acknowledges their power. They also call for the execution of Strafford. The king complies, but later regrets his decision and sends soldiers to shut down Parliament. This confrontation leads to civil war.

INTRADA Special Collection Vol. 228
Retail Price: $24.99
Available Now
For track listing and sound samples, please visit
http://store.intrada.com/s.nl/it.A/id.7957/.f


A very exciting release indeed and one I despaired of ever seeing on CD - and all in wonderful crisp stereo too!!

However, I can't see the Overture (2:03 on the cue sheet) mentioned above in the track listing on Intrada's site. There was also Exit Music and rather confusingly the original PRS cue sheet gives the timing for the Exit Music as 4:17 and the "Intermission Overture" as 1:51, whereas the Intrada CD has the Intermission Music as 4:21, so maybe the cue sheet is incorrect or the EMI boxes were mis-labelled?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 5:32 PM   
 By:   scoreman42   (Member)

Am I off base to say that there is a major Alex North influence here?

I hear the Alex North influence also. I knew something sounded familiar. Some of it sounds like The Shoes of the Fisherman.

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 6:00 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

Am I off base to say that there is a major Alex North influence here?

I hear the Alex North influence also. I knew something sounded familiar. Some of it sounds like The Shoes of the Fisherman.


Could just as easily say it has some Rosenman about it. The recent Film Music Society release of Rosenman's "Alexander the Great" has a similar style. It's a flavor I like though, so I'm not complaining.

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 6:10 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Knew nothing about this score. In fact wasn't expecting to like the sound samples. Instead I am pleasantly surprised and sold on this release as well.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 6:23 PM   
 By:   paul rossen   (Member)

Am I off base to say that there is a major Alex North influence here?

I hear the Alex North influence also. I knew something sounded familiar. Some of it sounds like The Shoes of the Fisherman.


Could just as easily say it has some Rosenman about it. The recent Film Music Society release of Rosenman's "Alexander the Great" has a similar style. It's a flavor I like though, so I'm not complaining.



Based upon just 50 'seconds' of the FMS release of Alexander the Great I heard music that Rosenman would reuse 20 years later in his Star Trek music. And yes, the Cromwell music sounds a 'bit' like what Rosenman came up with but I believe that North was a major influence on the Cromwell score -as I hear not only Shoes of the Fisherman but Cleopatra as well as Agony and the Ecstasy. That said Cromwell sounds quite spectacular in its own right.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 6:55 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

Interesting that most of the people posted saying that Cordell's score sounds like Alex North, because Cordell was Stanley Kubrick's other choice to score "2001: A Space Odyssey". Though I never heard the score, Leonard Maltin calls Cordell's score "An amateurish sounding Oscar nominated film score". To the people who posted, what do you think?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 7:12 PM   
 By:   Bob Bryden   (Member)

With this release and listening to the sound clips I'm reminded how much I like 'Khartoum' and how sad it is that Cordell wasn't given any more BIG assignments. I've always loved the 'Cromwell' music. Best thing about the film. Cordell was a great 'epic' composer and went largely unappreciated. Thanks Intrada.

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 7:20 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

Interesting that most of the people posted saying that Cordell's score sounds like Alex North, because Cordell was Stanley Kubrick's other choice to score "2001: A Space Odyssey". Though I never heard the score, Leonard Maltin calls Cordell's score "An amateurish sounding Oscar nominated film score". To the people who posted, what do you think?

I think it's an excellent score. But some of the chorus exclamations aren't overly impressive in my view (and that's possibly what Maltin was picking up on).

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 7:22 PM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

I've seen the film twice. Once on the big screen in San Francisco and the second time at a small 'art house' on The Sunset Strip in L.A. in the mid 70's. I've mentioned this story before in another thread but since it's my only'Cromwell' story, I'll repeat it. The little retrospective theatre was called 'The Tiffany' (I beleive) on Sunset. This was before video tapes, so if you wanted to see a specific film, you went to a retrospective showing. Sometime after 'Cromwell' had started a group of extremely boistorous and drunken men came inside and after a few moments, sat down. Then the unmistakeable sound of one of the men's laughter was changing the entire experience of the showing. I'm pretty sure I wasn't the only person who noticed that unmistakeable 'ring' in the laughter. It was Richard Harris laughing at what - himself - on the screen? No one said anything because we knew who it was, and perhaps we'd all seen the film before, who knows, the added attraction of Harris actually laughing out loud was priceless! It was Harris, I clearly saw his profile as he left the screening.
IT IS A MARVELOUS SCORE, WORTH THE MONEY AND MORE. BUY IT!

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 8:55 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

Not really feeling that main theme. The choral passages aren't doing much for me either. I guess it is the similarity to North others mention that keeps me from enjoying it. I've never been a fan of North.

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2013 - 9:01 PM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

Holy. Shit.

CROMWELL?!

I love his score to Khartoum (underrated movie too) and so this is a blind buy, especially after the samples.

 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2013 - 2:44 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

An excellent start to 2013. Fabulous score. Ordered!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2013 - 5:18 AM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

probably not an indicator, but I hope more Cordell is forthcoming (God Told Me To, Ring of Bright Water)

 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2013 - 5:20 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)


I hear the Alex North influence also. I knew something sounded familiar. Some of it sounds like The Shoes of the Fisherman.


There's a thing with Cordell's scores, which I remember Lukas K. attributed to early temp-track-love instructions. You'll find North's Cleo music in Khartoum during 'Gordon Enters the Mahdi's Camp' and a phase from Previn's '4 Horsemen' in 'Mosquito Squadron', plus some Holst in places. He did lift material occasionally, but he was a wonderful musician, largely self taught through his RAF band days. He was most famous for very forgettable light arrangements for singers ('How Much is that Doggie in the Window?') etc.. but he had all the tricks of the most serious post-Britten concert composers and could pull them up at ease.

I love the North sound anyhow, but often it's just a matter of 20th Century post-impressionist dissonances being taken up by many people. If 10 composers break the same rules at the same time, push the same envelope, with the same ensembles, it'll sound like they influenced one another, even if they didn't.

The film itself is a bore, all political speeches very contrivedly strung together, it reads like some very elder stateman's pompous memoirs, and Harris and the screenwriters just don't understand Cromwell or the puritans in terms of character at all. But the music is exquisite, as always with Cordell, and the modernities are important, since it's really about modern politics, not just period, though Cordell was always skilled at evoking cultural settings.


Mind you, I suppose that means Tadlow won't now do their set of Renaissance/historical suites that they hinted they might.

 
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