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 Posted:   May 6, 2013 - 3:37 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

TJ alerted me to this great Youtube find -- a 1997(?) documentary about soundtrack fans, featuring a lot of familiar faces from this crowd -- Lukas Kendall, Ford Thaxton, Paul Place, Recordman, Doug Fake and many others. Directed by our very own Paul Andrew Maclean. And also featuring Basil Poledouris.

Such a great 'time mirror' from around the time the soundtrack niche blossomed (and just a few years before the proliferation of niche labels):



Enjoy!

 
 
 Posted:   May 6, 2013 - 3:55 PM   
 By:   Michael24   (Member)

Wow! A great find indeed. I've bookmarked this and will watch it later tonight. Thanks for sharing. smile

 
 Posted:   May 6, 2013 - 7:43 PM   
 By:   Zaku   (Member)

What a great video. Lol'd at LK answering the phone and the guy from Music from the Movies talking about Zimmer (comparing him to North and Herrmann). Really enjoyed seeing everyones perspective of the film score art and collecting.

How cool would it be to have a video like this made today? It would be so different so much has changed.

 
 Posted:   May 6, 2013 - 8:12 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

I still have pent up nerd rage from using computers like that. Just seeing one makes me want to whack it to pieces for the sake of every other human being that ever used one.

 
 
 Posted:   May 7, 2013 - 1:08 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

What a great video. Lol'd at LK answering the phone and the guy from Music from the Movies talking about Zimmer (comparing him to North and Herrmann). Really enjoyed seeing everyones perspective of the film score art and collecting.

How cool would it be to have a video like this made today? It would be so different so much has changed.


Indeed. It would be cool to hear everyone's thoughts (especially on their predictions), 15 or 20 years later.

 
 
 Posted:   May 8, 2013 - 4:59 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

No more comments on this great find? I would have thought this would be an immediate "hot topic", especially in this forum which includes most of those guys!

 
 
 Posted:   May 8, 2013 - 9:28 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

That was great. Thanks! This has a 2000 copyright, but the material would have probably been compiled from as early as 1997, with Doug Fake's mention of Lady Diana's funeral. Fascinating to see "real people" outside the cinema ("I y'know like the creepy music, because you kinda like know that something scary's gonna happen, y┬┤know?"), and the way those in the biz (both composers and soundtrack producers) seem to come across more level-headed than some of the fans.

Basil Poledouris was really down-to-earth. Loved his observation that it's in many ways a misconception that film music offers composers less freedom than "serious" commissions. It reminded me of how Elisabeth Lutyens and Don Banks both actively looked for film work, not only to pay the bills, but also to stretch their creative wings. Lots of goodies from Basil Poledouris in this - how soundtracks were originally just a marketing tool before the collector craze started.

Then there's Recordman to make us feel OK about collecting as a hobby. A big part of me can identify with that.

Great input from LK himself - a lot of what he said might rile even the fans! I agree that too many people try to equate film music with classical music, when in fact it has more in common with pop music. Also his rubbishing of the mentality that states "If you've got nothing good to say, don't say anything"! Couldn't help smiling when he said "People still bitch about what isn't out. Look at the stuff that HAS come out!", and this was what, 15 years ago?

And Roy Donga's voice. Loved it. If he had had a heavy Scottish accent, he would have been me, but I wouldn't say "I used to tape all the 'ol 'orror music off t'telly n' stoof". I did actually use to do that, but I wouldn't have expressed my story using his voice.

 
 
 Posted:   May 8, 2013 - 10:24 AM   
 By:   Roy Donga   (Member)



And Roy Donga's voice. Loved it. If he had had a heavy Scottish accent, he would have been me, but I wouldn't say "I used to tape all the 'ol 'orror music off t'telly n' stoof". I did actually use to do that, but I wouldn't have expressed my story using his voice.


It's the only voice I have! and you don't want to hear my scottish!

I don't think I've seen this in twenty years, so thanks Paul for giving us the opportunity to see it - I'm going to check it out now,

 
 
 Posted:   May 9, 2013 - 2:54 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Did you understand yourself, Roy?

Just to add to my previous comments, I'd say that the whole thing made me more aware than ever of the passing of time. I don't know if it's just me getting old, but time is snowballing. Sometimes when I count back the years I miss out a whole decade and think that 1997 was six years ago.

Interesting to see Lukas talking about how he was impressed by the (very few) printed film music mags on the go when he was photocopying fanzines two sheets thick in his bedroom, and how, holding up a copy of the "improved, glossy FSM" (I think the first one was January/February 1997), he mentioned that he'd like to see it develop into a "real" magazine.

Another thing that made me think was when some of the interviewees said that the "new era" of film music was well underway with the Zimmer sound. Hasn't that been the dominant sound for about twenty years now? If that's the case (and correct me if I'm wrong), is this the longest period of time in which there have been few real developments in film music, for better or worse? I think I can more or less tell the difference between a score written in 1933 and one written in '53. There's a big difference too between a score from a '53 film and one written in '73. But between 1993 and 2013?

 
 
 Posted:   May 9, 2013 - 3:34 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Did you understand yourself, Roy?

Just to add to my previous comments, I'd say that the whole thing made me more aware than ever of the passing of time. I don't know if it's just me getting old, but time is snowballing. Sometimes when I count back the years I miss out a whole decade and think that 1997 was six years ago.

Interesting to see Lukas talking about how he was impressed by the (very few) printed film music mags on the go when he was photocopying fanzines two sheets thick in his bedroom, and how, holding up a copy of the "improved, glossy FSM" (I think the first one was January/February 1997), he mentioned that he'd like to see it develop into a "real" magazine.

Another thing that made me think was when some of the interviewees said that the "new era" of film music was well underway with the Zimmer sound. Hasn't that been the dominant sound for about twenty years now? If that's the case (and correct me if I'm wrong), is this the longest period of time in which there have been few real developments in film music, for better or worse? I think I can more or less tell the difference between a score written in 1933 and one written in '53. There's a big difference too between a score from a '53 film and one written in '73. But between 1993 and 2013?


The Zimmer 'power anthem' style that Doug Fake talked about here more or less dwindled away with the PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN films. Since then, it's been all about the ostinato, man! (inspired by John Powell's "Bourne riff", no doubt), including Zimmer himself. So a lot has changed there too.

But yeah....lots has changed in the 16 years since then, and like you I feel like this was 'yesterday'. Can't believe it's currently 20 years since I graduated from upper secondary school. eek

 
 Posted:   May 9, 2013 - 3:54 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Fun travel back in time! And nice to see some casual footage of Poledouris.

 
 
 Posted:   May 9, 2013 - 6:09 AM   
 By:   cdelelee   (Member)

Terrific doc.
It made me smile when they talk about Soundtrack ! as the grand-daddy of film music publications, as it was the 1st one where I contributed when I was in my twenties, from 1992 to its end.

If I can share some memories, before that I was writing in the French mag L'Ecran Fantastique and I remember having been in touch with Doug Fake for the first time, he agreed to send me Intrada promos for my column.. and about 20 years later, I still collaborate with Intrada for another magazine, with his daughter Regina and of course Roger F. Great people. It's awesome how much American labels (counting also LLL) can be supportive of a French magazine.

I remember sending questions for the dedicated column in FSM to Lukas in 1993, who said once "stop sending so many questions!!!" before publishing some of my reviews in a not-so-fluent English. It was so nice, Lukas smile

Never met them face to face, but these guys are part of my life.

Well, we're still young, aren't we ?

 
 
 Posted:   May 9, 2013 - 6:36 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Terrific doc.
It made me smile when they talk about Soundtrack ! as the grand-daddy of film music publications, as it was the 1st one where I contributed when I was in my twenties, from 1992 to its end.


Soundtrack! is hardly the 'granddaddy' of film music publications. Cinemascore was before that, as were stuff like The Film Music Notebook and others -- all the way back to the 70's. I reacted to that statement in the doc.

 
 Posted:   May 9, 2013 - 6:50 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

Cool video!

 
 Posted:   May 9, 2013 - 7:11 AM   
 By:   Erik Woods   (Member)


Soundtrack! is hardly the 'granddaddy' of film music publications. Cinemascore was before that, as were stuff like The Film Music Notebook and others -- all the way back to the 70's. I reacted to that statement in the doc.


I don't think he was saying that it was the first. I'm sure he meant that Sountrack! was arguably the most respected film music magazine out there at the time.

-Erik-

 
 
 Posted:   May 9, 2013 - 9:46 AM   
 By:   TJ   (Member)


The Zimmer 'power anthem' style that Doug Fake talked about here more or less dwindled away with the PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN films.


In many cases, I prefer the 'power anthem' style to what came after it! At least the power anthems were melodic! smile

 
 
 Posted:   May 9, 2013 - 9:54 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)


The Zimmer 'power anthem' style that Doug Fake talked about here more or less dwindled away with the PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN films.


In many cases, I prefer the 'power anthem' style to what came after it! At least the power anthems were melodic! smile


I agree with that wholeheartedly, although I like the recent 'sound' too.

 
 
 Posted:   May 10, 2013 - 5:54 AM   
 By:   soundtracksi   (Member)

many thanks for putting this up,
a mega blast from the past

 
 
 Posted:   May 10, 2013 - 8:03 AM   
 By:   rickO   (Member)

This documentary should be permanently available right on the FSM sight. It's very well put together and informative.

-Rick O.

 
 
 Posted:   May 10, 2013 - 5:32 PM   
 By:   samlowry   (Member)

Excellent little documentary that certainly takes us back in time.

One thing it made me realize when they talk about reviews, is that I used to read reviews and sometimes base my decision to buy or not buy an album based on it.

Nowdays, I hardly ever read any reviews anymore. If I'm not sure about buying a certain album, I just go on Youtube or Screen Archive and listen to audio samples.

Curious to hear if the rest of you also reads less reviews today compared to 15 years ago?

 
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