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 Posted:   May 15, 2013 - 11:42 AM   
 By:   Ludwig van   (Member)

There are particular high points in Morricone's music that are so beautifully constructed in their ability to release a great deal of emotion at just the right moment.

For example, what makes the crane shot over the rooftop from ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST so cathartic in this scene from 1:21-1:44?



Any favorites of yours?

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2013 - 12:44 PM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)

In Casualties of War, when Michael Fox is consoling the vietnamese girl in the hut, Morricone wrote a beautiful underscore with strings and solo flute, strongly contrasting the horrific events (and music) that preceded it. A thing of pure beauty.

Alex

P.S.: I'm still waiting for a (unlikely) complete release of the score.

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2013 - 1:10 PM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

There are particular high points in Morricone's music that are so beautifully constructed in their ability to release a great deal of emotion at just the right moment.

Any favorites of yours?



Many! For example...

When the little boy appears in the Clearwater ranch doorway in OUATITW to find that his family has been massacred, Morricone hits us with a single guitar strike that never fails to make the hairs stand up on the back of my neck.

TG

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2013 - 1:16 PM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

And in The Legend of 1900, when the first immigrant sees the Statue of Liberty and shouts "America!" and the music swells to reflect all the hope and dreams inherent in the long transatlantic voyage. A wonderful moment in a wonderful film.

TG

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2013 - 1:39 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

I guess this is an obvious one:


 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2013 - 1:41 PM   
 By:   Ludwig van   (Member)

There are particular high points in Morricone's music that are so beautifully constructed in their ability to release a great deal of emotion at just the right moment.

Any favorites of yours?



Many! For example...

When the little boy appears in the Clearwater ranch doorway in OUATITW to find that his family has been massacred, Morricone hits us with a single guitar strike that never fails to make the hairs stand up on the back of my neck.

TG


Oh, that one for sure! I think there's a lot to be said for the way the sound of the boy's footsteps running towards the doorway are amplified beyond a mere naturalistic level. That way, when the guitar chord strikes, it's as though we've been prepped for it by the rise in the level of the sound effects. In other words, it's as if the chord is the peak of a sound "crescendo" that heightens its effectiveness.

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2013 - 1:51 PM   
 By:   Ludwig van   (Member)

I guess this is an obvious one:




Great example. I just noticed that the big cathartic moment here at 2:58 has the same bass line and the same basic chord progression as Jill's Theme when the voice comes in (at 0:42 in the clip in my first post above). There seems to be something highly emotional about those chords with that bass line.

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2013 - 2:28 PM   
 By:   barryfan   (Member)

I like the whole climactic scene in Mission to Mars when they show our heroes escaping the planet.

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2013 - 5:57 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

So many, so many- NANA-The ending when Nana takes off in the balloon.THE ISLAND-80- Ending when boy and Michael Caine survive at sea etc etc

 
 Posted:   May 15, 2013 - 5:59 PM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

The kissing scenes at the end of CINEMA PARADISO... Just gorgeous...

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2013 - 6:17 PM   
 By:   Ludwig van   (Member)

This is a great list so far - keep 'em coming...

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2013 - 7:05 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

TO YOR- YES INDEED, that was fantastic.

 
 Posted:   May 15, 2013 - 7:18 PM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

Another gorgeous musical moments from Morricone:

- When Charles Martin Smith's character dies on "The Untouchables"

- Miserere at the end of "The Mission"

- The big finale music on "Mission to Mars"

- The scene when old Robert De Niro looks at the hole in the bar and we go back in time on "Once Upon a Time in America"

- The tragic finale of "The Starmaker"

- The girl's death on "Casualties of War"

- The outstanding song at the end of "A Pure Formality"

Morricone is a f*cking genius!

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2013 - 11:52 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Yes he is, - THE RED TENT-71-His main theme is typical beautiful ENNIO, But he secondary theme, which expresses the cold alien loneliness of the artic is a emotional wallop.

 
 
 Posted:   May 16, 2013 - 8:53 AM   
 By:   Ludwig van   (Member)

I had a listen again to the CINEMA PARADISO kissing scenes and found that once again Morricone uses that same bass line and chord progression I mentioned with the cathartic points in ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST and THE MISSION.

The progression I'm talking about has the bass line slowly falling down the scale going 1(8)-7-6-5-4, and always supports the same chords on every other note - the chords on notes 1, 6, and 4. There's something about this progression that sounds cathartic already, even profound. Just so you know what I'm talking about, you can hear the progression between 2:58 and 3:08 of the clip that Morricone (our fellow member) posted:



The progression is a staple of popular music, but Morricone makes it sound more unique. I think this might be because Morricone always has those lovely inner voices that are loaded with suspensions, which give the music that heartstring-tugging need for resolution.

But in PARADISO, it starts with the same kind of progression you hear with the jazz standard "Autumn Leaves" before going into the "cathartic" progression.

I haven't studied the rest of your suggestions yet, but I have a feeling I'd find more. Anyone else notice a similar sound in these cathartic moments, in anything - melody, orchestration, chord progression, rhythm?

 
 
 Posted:   May 16, 2013 - 9:15 AM   
 By:   Mathias   (Member)

The theme from Orca! Here in two different versions!

Opening scene: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSv5w4IWSfc

"Funeral" at sea scene: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tfuzkg2RwsU

I don´t know if it´s really what you are looking for, but it´s very beautiful music.

Mathias

 
 
 Posted:   May 16, 2013 - 9:38 AM   
 By:   Dr Lenera   (Member)

Whenever you here the main theme in A Fistful Of Dynamite during the flashbacks
Noodles seeing Deborah's son and we then see Max [Deborah's theme/main theme], Once Upon A Time In America
The Ecstacy Of Gold, The Good The Bad And The Ugly

 
 
 Posted:   May 16, 2013 - 2:17 PM   
 By:   Ludwig van   (Member)

Whenever you here the main theme in A Fistful Of Dynamite during the flashbacks


This really is fascinating. These flashbacks also incorporate the "cathartic" progression I was talking about. Listen from 34:32 in this video and you'll hear it again - the stepwise bass down the scale, but this time skipping a note in going from 6 to 4 (heard at 34:39):



Of course this progression does pop up in other less emotional scenes in films as well. Like in "Ness and His Family" from THE UNTOUCHABLES:



But there does seem to be a high proportion of these cathartic moments that use the same chords and bass line. Very interesting.

 
 
 Posted:   May 16, 2013 - 6:22 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

TO MATHIAS- AGREED, Orca is a beautiful, beautiful score, that just never got the credit it deserves. Probably because the film was not liked by many and also didn't set the B.O on fire.

 
 Posted:   May 16, 2013 - 9:09 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Whenever you here the main theme in A Fistful Of Dynamite during the flashbacksy

BEYOND description
brm

ps all those who mention MISSION TO MARS are hereby banned from any future discussions !

 
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