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 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 4:09 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Personally I find most composers shine between their mid 30's thru their mid 50's. (They seem to become brilliant in their 40's) Composers I loved in the past generally write less complex stuff later in their careers, and I just don't hear the enthusiasm they once had.

But the one exception where I think a composer is writing better, more complex music today would be Joe Hisaishi. His themes seem more lush, and fleshed out, and it sounds like he is writing for a bigger orchestra. (Don't know if that is the case of not)

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 4:19 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Well of course it is just an opinion but I felt GEORGES DELERUE, did great stuff throughout his career. But some of my favorites were from the last 10 years of his life. AGNUS OF GOD, SALVADOR-A SUMMER STORY-JOE VS THE VOLCANO- FRENCH REVOLUTION-CRIMES OF THE HEART-HER ALIBI ETC ETC

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 4:23 PM   
 By:   SentientMind   (Member)

Forgive me if I misunderstood you, but are you saying that complexity is a measure for how great a score is ?

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 4:23 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Totally agree Dan. Great choice. (and yes it is subjective question)

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 4:29 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Forgive me if I misunderstood you, but are you saying that complexity is a measure for how great a score is ?

For me personally, I gravitate towards more complex writing and I think it takes more skill. The end results are generally more pleasurable to me. I also have a greater admiration for the work. That is not to say a simple piano theme is "less". I can appreciate a "sketch", but it is not as glorious as a "painting".

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 2:23 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

Well of course it is just an opinion but I felt GEORGES DELERUE, did great stuff throughout his career. But some of my favorites were from the last 10 years of his life. AGNUS OF GOD, SALVADOR-A SUMMER STORY-JOE VS THE VOLCANO- FRENCH REVOLUTION-CRIMES OF THE HEART-HER ALIBI ETC ETC

Actually, his later music was much more streamlined than his early to mid-career works. I find his pre-Hollywood scores MUCH more interesting.

A composer whose music got more sophisticated in his later years was Max Steiner.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 2:26 AM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)

Forgive me if I misunderstood you, but are you saying that complexity is a measure for how great a score is ?

For me personally, I gravitate towards more complex writing and I think it takes more skill. The end results are generally more pleasurable to me. I also have a greater admiration for the work. That is not to say a simple piano theme is "less". I can appreciate a "sketch", but it is not as glorious as a "painting".


when you say "complex" writing to what you're refering?
orchestration? counterpoint? harmony? melody?
because a single piano piece can be complex too..

or a piece for a smaller group of instruments than a LARGE orchestra..
Listen eg. to Arlington by Williams (from his JFK score).
Only strings orchestra (except for the horn introduction), but yet so complex in harmony, counterpoint etc..

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 6:11 AM   
 By:   Kim Tong   (Member)

John Williams. I do not really care for his early stuff, but JAWS hit and he has been pretty steady since. I will not start the thread, but how about "Composers Who Got Worst Later In Their Careers?" I have one composer in mind, but I do not want to steal Yor's thunder.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 6:29 AM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

I will not start the thread, but how about "Composers Who Got Worst Later In Their Careers?" I have one composer in mind, but I do not want to steal Yor's thunder.





 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 8:07 AM   
 By:   Maleficio   (Member)


But the one exception where I think a composer is writing better, more complex music today would be Joe Hisaishi. His themes seem more lush, and fleshed out, and it sounds like he is writing for a bigger orchestra. (Don't know if that is the case of not)


Hisaishi seems to have evolved from being a largely synth based composer to a purely orchestral composer.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 8:55 AM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

TO MALEFICIO-Agree , great point.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 9:03 AM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

Master Jerry Goldsmith surely got better with time.

Too bad he was not called to score so many great movies as he was in the past...

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 10:04 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Not sure if they got "better," but both Duke Ellington and Ravel produced consistently great stuff well into old age. Duke was 65, I think, when "Far East Suite" came out.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 11:10 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Roberto Gerhard had transitioned himself from being a "Spanish" composer (using Iberian subjects as topics for his themes) into a leading post-WWII international serialist (based in the U.K.) and produced his finest and most detailed concert music during the 1960s:

THE PLAGUE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=z8paRdoRoko

CONCERTO FOR ORCHESTRA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0ndg4EZenI&feature=player_detailpage

EPITHALAMION
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1WDhp_emw8&feature=player_detailpage

SYMPHONY 4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGp-EAhqxGs&feature=player_detailpage

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 11:14 AM   
 By:   kingtolkien   (Member)

John Williams

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 11:20 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

I have been more impressed with Elfman in his later career. But he is one of very few. All the rest seem to go the other way, even though the best of them learn new tricks as they go along.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 11:43 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

I agree with Morricone there.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 4:03 PM   
 By:   robertmro   (Member)

Tiomkin started out good and just got better over time
I would argue that he was much more at the top of his game when he quit than where John Williams is now. Williams peaked a long time ago.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 5:51 PM   
 By:   Elmo Bernstein   (Member)

To me one of the most obvious examples is John Williams. I don't think he did anything remarkable before the The Reivers and Images. His TV music for Irwin Allen was fair but nowhere near as good as the stuff Goldsmith, Schifrin, Fried or Fred Steiner were doing for TV in the 60s. None But The Brave is decent but not among the best film music of the 60s. Williams's disaster movie scores have their moments, but the real turning point in his career is Jaws - which he composed when he was well into his 40s.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 6:05 PM   
 By:   Bill Finn   (Member)

A subject that I've given more than a little thought to. As much music as film composers
need to write just to sustain their careers, it's a wonder that any of them have anything left
after a certain age. Many brilliant composers seem to spend their final years of composing, just
kind of repeating things that they already did much better, when they were younger.

The first composer that I remember noticing his 'career trajectory' was Alfred Newman. I don't
suppose that I'm the biggest 'golden age' fan out there, but it's kind of where I began, And I don't remember any 'golden age' composer or even any 'silver age' composer, going out with the bang that Newman seemingly had. I mean c'mon, TGSET, HTWWW, Counterfeit Traitor, Nevada Smith and then AIRPORT? The guy just never seemed to stop improving as a composer in my opinion.

And this was following a MAJOR career of scoring pictures. I'm consistently in awe of Newman's ability to improve his composing.

 
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