Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 10:39 AM   
 By:   edwzoomom   (Member)


I recall this movie as I was growing up. I think it may have been one of the first during which I became aware of the music "in the background" as I used to call it. This is one movie that was truly more impactful in black and white. The stunning performances of Shirley Booth and Burt Lancaster are two of my personal favorites to this day. I know I was quite young the first time I saw and can clearly recall crying as it ended because Little Sheba never did come back!

Now to my question - does Waxman's score still exist and if so, is it a candidate for release - maybe along with another Waxman or score from that era?

Bruce? Anyone?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 11:59 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

The laserdisc of the film that was released in 1991 contained an isolated score track. So that holds out some hope that the original tracks still exist.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 12:11 PM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

I love this film, but there are a couple of "problems" with it: Burt was substantially younger than Booth and he is referred to as "Daddy" by her - this I found bizarre. I didn't like the young people (Richard Jaekal in particular) as they were shrill and one-dimensional. But as a study in loneliness and alcoholism and the performance of Shirley Booth, the film is stunning. That closing scene where she's in the kitchen making bacon and eggs for "Daddy" and talking about Sheba never coming back - this is pure Inge and just wonderful.

I loved all the films made from Inge's troubled pen: "Dark at the Top of the Stairs", "Splendor in the Grass", "Picnic" (my personal fave and one of the greatest American films of all time, IMO) and, of course, "Come Back Little Sheba". I cannot remember at this moment any other films based on Inge's work, but I'm sure there are some.

All I remember is Daniel Mann directed "Sheba", but I cannot place the music of Waxman directly.

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 12:31 PM   
 By:   edwzoomom   (Member)

I love this film, but there are a couple of "problems" with it: Burt was substantially younger than Booth and he is referred to as "Daddy" by her - this I found bizarre. I didn't like the young people (Richard Jaekal in particular) as they were shrill and one-dimensional. But as a study in loneliness and alcoholism and the performance of Shirley Booth, the film is stunning. That closing scene where she's in the kitchen making bacon and eggs for "Daddy" and talking about Sheba never coming back - this is pure Inge and just wonderful.

I loved all the films made from Inge's troubled pen: "Dark at the Top of the Stairs", "Splendor in the Grass", "Picnic" (my personal fave and one of the greatest American films of all time, IMO) and, of course, "Come Back Little Sheba". I cannot remember at this moment any other films based on Inge's work, but I'm sure there are some.

All I remember is Daniel Mann directed "Sheba", but I cannot place the music of Waxman directly.


I see what you mean regarding the age difference - Burt was approximately 15 years younger than Shirley Booth. When I was young this disparity didn't occur to me but I too noticed it later. I recall thinking that Shelley Winters would have been a good choice but then she probably was still too much of a vixen to play the role of dowdy, tired Lola at the time.

This may give you an idea of the Waxman score:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLkR7mzysAs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFIi_ugeang

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 1:21 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Paramount bought the rights to William Inge's play for $100,000, plus a percentage of the profits. Both Sidney Blackmer and Shirley Booth, who created the roles of "'Doc'" and "Lola" on the stage, were considered for the film, and when Booth appeared unavailable because of Broadway commitments, producer Hal Wallis considered casting Bette Davis as Lola. Davis turned down the role, and Booth subsequently became available, so she was cast. It was her screen debut. Booth, who won a Tony for her Broadway portrayal of Lola, also won a Best Actress Academy Award for the film, and was named best actress of 1952 by the New York Critics Circle. In March 1952, Booth signed a three-picture contract with Wallis. Booth, who was in her mid-forties when she made "Come Back, Little Sheba," appeared in only four more pictures. Her last screen role was in Paramount's 1958 release "Hot Spell."

Burt Lancaster persuaded Hal Wallis to cast him as Doc, even though, at age thirty-eight, he was too young for the part. In his autobiography, Wallis commented that in order to make the trim and muscular Lancaster appear older, his baggy, shapeless costume was padded at the waist and he was instructed to stoop, hollow his chest and shuffle his feet. Critics praised Lancaster's performance. The Hollywood Reporter reviewer commented that it was a "complete switch from anything he has ever done and easily the outstanding effort of his career," while the Variety critic declared that the actor had "brought an unsupected talent" to the role.

"Come Back, Little Sheba" was the directorial debut of Daniel Mann. In addition to Booth's Oscar, the film was nominated for Best Supporting Actress (Terry Moore) and Best Film Editing Academy Awards. The picture earned $3.5 million at the box office and was the number thirteen money-maker of 1953.

Other films based upon William Inge's works include Marilyn Monroe's "Bus Stop" (1956, based upon the Inge play), Joanne Woodward's "The Stripper" (1963, based on Inge's play A Loss of Roses), and Anne Heywood's "Good Luck, Miss Wyckoff" (1979, based upon the Inge novel). Inge also wrote an original screenplay for John Frankenheimer's "All Fall Down" (1962).

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 1:43 PM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

I see what you mean regarding the age difference - Burt was approximately 15 years younger than Shirley Booth. When I was young this disparity didn't occur to me but I too noticed it later. I recall thinking that Shelley Winters would have been a good choice but then she probably was still too much of a vixen to play the role of dowdy, tired Lola at the time.

This may give you an idea of the Waxman score:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLkR7mzysAs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFIi_ugeang



Not true, Winters already played a dowdy type in A PLACE IN THE SUN. Booth originated the SHEBA role on the stage.

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 1:53 PM   
 By:   edwzoomom   (Member)

Paramount bought the rights to William Inge's play for $100,000, plus a percentage of the profits. Both Sidney Blackmer and Shirley Booth, who created the roles of "'Doc'" and "Lola" on the stage, were considered for the film, and when Booth appeared unavailable because of Broadway commitments, producer Hal Wallis considered casting Bette Davis as Lola. Davis turned down the role, and Booth subsequently became available, so she was cast. It was her screen debut. Booth, who won a Tony for her Broadway portrayal of Lola, also won a Best Actress Academy Award for the film, and was named best actress of 1952 by the New York Critics Circle. In March 1952, Booth signed a three-picture contract with Wallis. Booth, who was in her mid-forties when she made "Come Back, Little Sheba," appeared in only four more pictures. Her last screen role was in Paramount's 1958 release "Hot Spell."

Burt Lancaster persuaded Hal Wallis to cast him as Doc, even though, at age thirty-eight, he was too young for the part. In his autobiography, Wallis commented that in order to make the trim and muscular Lancaster appear older, his baggy, shapeless costume was padded at the waist and he was instructed to stoop, hollow his chest and shuffle his feet. Critics praised Lancaster's performance. The Hollywood Reporter reviewer commented that it was a "complete switch from anything he has ever done and easily the outstanding effort of his career," while the Variety critic declared that the actor had "brought an unsupected talent" to the role.

"Come Back, Little Sheba" was the directorial debut of Daniel Mann. In addition to Booth's Oscar, the film was nominated for Best Supporting Actress (Terry Moore) and Best Film Editing Academy Awards. The picture earned $3.5 million at the box office and was the number thirteen money-maker of 1953.

Other films based upon William Inge's works include Marilyn Monroe's "Bus Stop" (1956, based upon the Inge play), Joanne Woodward's "The Stripper" (1963, based on Inge's play A Loss of Roses), and Anne Heywood's "Good Luck, Miss Wyckoff" (1979, based upon the Inge novel). Inge also wrote an original screenplay for John Frankenheimer's "All Fall Down" (1962).


Bob,

Thank you so much for this information. As I think back, I always associated Shirley Booth with her role as Hazel in the sitcom. This is unfair since she truly had a successful career prior to this with her role as Lola on Broadway and on the screen. She won the coveted Tony, Oscar and Golden Globe. Burt Lancaster truly did appear older than his years in this movie. We should all be grateful that his persuasive skills triumphed.

I did not realize that Inge's play was the inspiration for "Good Luck, Miss Wyckoff". This is one Kritzerland release that I missed and surely regret.

Again, thanks for the info - delightful.

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 1:58 PM   
 By:   edwzoomom   (Member)

I see what you mean regarding the age difference - Burt was approximately 15 years younger than Shirley Booth. When I was young this disparity didn't occur to me but I too noticed it later. I recall thinking that Shelley Winters would have been a good choice but then she probably was still too much of a vixen to play the role of dowdy, tired Lola at the time.

This may give you an idea of the Waxman score:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLkR7mzysAs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFIi_ugeang



Not true, Winters already played a dowdy type in A PLACE IN THE SUN. Booth originated the SHEBA role on the stage.


Not true? I was stating this as an opinion - not a fact. I am aware of the role Shelley Winters played in "A Place In The Sun". However, I still envision her in her many hot and saucy roles as the vixen. Just an opinion.

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 1:58 PM   
 By:   edwzoomom   (Member)

I see what you mean regarding the age difference - Burt was approximately 15 years younger than Shirley Booth. When I was young this disparity didn't occur to me but I too noticed it later. I recall thinking that Shelley Winters would have been a good choice but then she probably was still too much of a vixen to play the role of dowdy, tired Lola at the time.

This may give you an idea of the Waxman score:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLkR7mzysAs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFIi_ugeang



Not true, Winters already played a dowdy type in A PLACE IN THE SUN. Booth originated the SHEBA role on the stage.


Not true? I was stating this as an opinion - not a fact. I am aware of the role Shelley Winters played in "A Place In The Sun". However, I still envision her in her many hot and saucy roles as the vixen. Just an opinion.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 3:17 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

I went back and looked for a 12 year old thread I posted here about Waxman.

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=2031&forumID=1&archive=1

See above.

When I just reread it, I noted that no one mentioned Come Back Little Sheba. I barely remember seeing this film on TCM, and I should probably revisit it. Maturity does give us a different set of eyes.

edwzooman, I played those youtube cuts you posted. The second one with Booth on the phone is just gorgeous. It is lovely and heart-wrenching music to back a painful scene. That theme reminded me of the love theme between Gregory Peck and his wife in The Paradine Case, and that
love theme, while way too short in the movie, is one of the loveliest love themes I've ever heard.

Thanks for sharing this film and its music. It is new information for me.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 4:04 PM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

This IS a lovely score and not in-your-face!! Booth's performance is one of the greatest on film, IMO. Power and subtlety combined. Where does that come from?

I agree about Winters and her sleezy roles in previous films. There's a coldness about this actress which wouldn't have worked in "Come Back Little Sheba". Certainly she was an actress of intensity, but I always feel she's portraying the mentally unstable whereas Booth had warmth in spades. Think of Winters in "Lolita"!! Shrill.

Casting is a very special art and sometimes they get it incredibly wrong, but mostly they get it right.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 4:39 PM   
 By:   Ralph   (Member)

Inge also wrote an original screenplay for John Frankenheimer's "All Fall Down" (1962).

Just to clarify, the screenplay for “All Fall Down” was not an original. It was, however, Inge’s only adaptation of someone else’s work, in this case from James Leo Herlihy’s novel.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 6:09 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)


Hope no one minds if I post the love theme from The Paradine Case as it seems a bit similar to
Come Back Little Sheba.

I love the melody, and I like Waxman's use of counterpoint which I find he does so well in other scores like Mr. Roberts.

The love theme in the youtube below starts at 7:14 through 9:08.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1uh7__e1nOg

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 6:22 PM   
 By:   edwzoomom   (Member)

startquote]I went back and looked for a 12 year old thread I posted here about Waxman.

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=2031&forumID=1&archive=1

See above.

When I just reread it, I noted that no one mentioned Come Back Little Sheba. I barely remember seeing this film on TCM, and I should probably revisit it. Maturity does give us a different set of eyes.

edwzooman, I played those youtube cuts you posted. The second one with Booth on the phone is just gorgeous. It is lovely and heart-wrenching music to back a painful scene. That theme reminded me of the love theme between Gregory Peck and his wife in The Paradine Case, and that
love theme, while way too short in the movie, is one of the loveliest love themes I've ever heard.

Thanks for sharing this film and its music. It is new information for me.

You are very welcome Joan. As a newcomer here, it feels good to be able to contribute something. Many members have been so welcoming to me and have shared so much knowledge and insight about various pieces I have referred to. Something I also enjoy are the recommendations I receive of scores I have yet to listen to. Now that you have mentioned the love theme from The Paradine, I will surely have to go search for it and take a listen. Thank you for this.

My first viewing of "Come Back Little Sheba" came when I was quite young. Even at an early age, I was a movie hound and had pretty much easy access to any movie that was on the TV. I remember seeing movies in serial form on morning and afternoon TV - I never missed an episode! My love of movie music has deep roots.

Now we really need to push for this release!

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 7:16 PM   
 By:   edwzoomom   (Member)

Hope no one minds if I post the love theme from The Paradine Case as it seems a bit similar to
Come Back Little Sheba.

I love the melody, and I like Waxman's use of counterpoint which I find he does so well in other scores like Mr. Roberts.

The love theme in the youtube below starts at 7:14 through 9:08.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1uh7__e1nOg


Joan, one word - Amazing!. I do not mind at all. Instead I am extremely grateful. Thank you.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 8:52 PM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

Ed, that treatment of the "Rhapsody" (for piano AND orchestra!) is reminiscent of Deutsch's score for "The Apartment" - though I think the Waxman is a far better piece. Generally, I don't like piano WITH orchestra for film scores as the instrument tends to overwhelm the music, and the passages have a quasi-romantic feel to them which sometimes spoils the music. I think this score would have been excellent with just the orchestral instruments, as it seems to carry the main theme and the piano (certainly at the start) is merely decorative.

Just a preference of mine.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 9:46 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

edw, glad you liked the music I posted.


In The Paradine case, Peck, a man married to a wonderful woman, is a barrister who defends Mrs. Paradine who is accused of murder. He becomes besotted with her and listens more to his heart than to the evidence. I like the fact that Waxman does not give Paradine a lovely theme. You hear the main theme or her theme more often in the piece I posted. Some of it is in a minor key and is not all that attractive. For Peck's loving loyal wife, he composes a gorgeous melodic theme.

Waxman was just plain talented. This was a Hitchcock movie, and I'm not sure if he ever used Waxman again. Maybe manderly will chime in here.

My favorite Waxman score is Mr. Roberts, and I NEVER tire of listening to it.

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 11:19 PM   
 By:   Ed   (Member)

For anyone who doesn't already know, Varese's "Legends Of Hollywood - Franz Waxman Vol.1" featured a beautifully played short suite (5:36).

That whole 4-disc series was tremendous and compliments Gerhardt's "Sunset Boulevard" album well.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2013 - 12:49 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....Waxman was just plain talented. This was a Hitchcock movie, and I'm not sure if he ever used Waxman again. Maybe manderly will chime in here.....


Well, of course there was a final, little-known, film collaboration between Mr. Hitchcock and Mr. Waxman that didn't cause much public interest---what was it now?---REAR WINDOW, or something like that! smile (Which, by the way, could also use a CD release although it's a slim score with a lot of source material and might have to be paired with something else.)

Incidentally, I'd guess Waxman's participation in REBECCA and THE PARADINE CASE were more attributable to David O. Selznick's production overseeing than Hitchcock's choices.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2013 - 7:52 AM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Well manderley, I knew you would help us out. I mean it is EASY to forget that Waxman scored such unknown movies like Rebecca and Rear Window. Never heard of them.wink (Now I'm going to beat my head against a wall for such forgetfulness to justify such forgetfulness and to exacerbate such forgetfulness!!)

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.