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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: Outland
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2010 - 9:09 AM   
 By:   foxmorty   (Member)

my tracking info says this could possibly be waiting for me when i get home from work tonight. that's very exciting indeed! both varese and fsm are impressing with the speedy deliveries pre their ship date estimates. i guess that's an easy way to build good will with the fan base!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2010 - 9:56 AM   
 By:   alexp   (Member)

I just received my copy in the mail at the office, today.

How am I going to this CD, tonight?

Being that the score is dark in nature, I’m going to dim all the lights, except for a reading light to read the booklet notes, turn on the stereo and let the brooding orchestrations take over me.

Good night.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2010 - 8:23 PM   
 By:   RM Eastman   (Member)

Just listened to "Outland" and it is nothing short of superb. I could have done without the source cues which are awful, but I can program them out.

Many thanks to Lukas for this excellent release.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 7:22 AM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

Wow, almost none of FSM's releases over the past TWO YEARS have been Golden Age (I'm frankly disappointed not to see them show up with regularity any more), the big exception being the Rozsa Treasury. In recent years they've gotten much more into the 70s and especially 80s than they have in the past. And they've released AT LEAST as many Holy Grails as Intrada or LaLaLand. The difference with FSM, and the reason they don't have a reputation for sell-outs, is because Lukas doesn't like them and tries to avoid them, even if it hurts him financially. He wants to make sure the music remains available to collectors, even if it's a more obscure score. Hence why he releases 3000 copies for Leigh Harline (Broken Lance, 7 Faces of Dr. Lao) or even more obscure, underappreciated composers. Do you see Intrada doing that? No. For the obscure stuff (and even not so obscure -- look at The Miracle Worker) they are content to press only 1000 copies and sell out quickly.

To reiterate: All of the labels release a pretty even mixture of Holy Grails and obscure stuff, but FSM doesn't put small limits on the obscure stuff, so they have more of their catalog still hanging around.

Yavar

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 7:53 AM   
 By:   Maleficio   (Member)

Do you see Intrada doing that? No. For the obscure stuff (and even not so obscure -- look at The Miracle Worker) they are content to press only 1000 copies and sell out quickly

Perhaps Intrada would love to press 3000 copies for many of their releases but doesn't have the vast resources (that FSM apparently has) to do so. Remember that 1000 copy sell outs are more profitable and thus much more beneficial to the company.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 7:53 AM   
 By:   alexp   (Member)

I just listened to half of Disc 1 of Outland the other night. I am impressed with the robust sound quality of the source material—the crispness of the brass, the pounding of the bass, even the subtle background sounds of score pages turning (those sound elements must be pretty damn good), but those sounds are low-level and do not disturb the enjoyment of music.

I could have done without the source cues which are awful, but I can program them out.

I like the source music and, being a fan of the film and the music, it is also keeper. My minor quip is that after a soft sounding music track where I had the volume turned up high, the thumping disco-tech music hits you immediately and it surprised me, so, I had to quickly lower the volume.


My thanks to Lukas, Mike, and Bruce for presenting this almost 30 year-old score and making it sound as if it were recorded yesterday.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 8:28 AM   
 By:   Jeff Eldridge   (Member)

Wow, almost none of FSM's releases over the past TWO YEARS have been Golden Age (I'm frankly disappointed not to see them show up with regularity any more), the big exception being the Rozsa Treasury.

The Rozsa Treasury is pretty big exception! And don't forget the Raksin set and the Western collections. If you look at the total number of discs/films represented by these sets they balance out a bit more compared with the Silver Age titles.

Plus, I happen to know that there will be some Golden Age titles in the not-too-distant future that should please collectors.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 8:59 AM   
 By:   rickO   (Member)

I just listened to half of Disc 1 of Outland the other night. I am impressed with the robust sound quality of the source material—the crispness of the brass, the pounding of the bass, even the subtle background sounds of score pages turning (those sound elements must be pretty damn good), but those sounds are low-level and do not disturb the enjoyment of music.

I could have done without the source cues which are awful, but I can program them out.

I like the source music and, being a fan of the film and the music, it is also keeper. My minor quip is that after a soft sounding music track where I had the volume turned up high, the thumping disco-tech music hits you immediately and it surprised me, so, I had to quickly lower the volume.


My thanks to Lukas, Mike, and Bruce for presenting this almost 30 year-old score and making it sound as if it were recorded yesterday.


This edition of OUTLAND is fantastic -- the subtlety and magic of Goldsmith's score really comes alive on the recording! 79-83 is my favorite Goldsmith time period. He still retained a lot of the experimental sound palletes from earlier in his career but married to a more streamlined style -- really listenable and interesting!

The Boddicker source cues are actually interesting and well worth inclusion. Reminds me of 80s pop songs! Goldsmith didn't quite hit the mark with his versions of the dance music -- so it's nice to hear the film versions which I prefer.

Good job FSM!

-Rick O.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 9:41 AM   
 By:   mark ford   (Member)

This was one of my favorite scores when it came out and I played the LP to death, so having this new release from FSM is just plain fantastic. This will sit nicely on the shelf next to Intrada's superlative Alien set as a companion piece.

The score tracks at times are very similar to the album tracks, however there are just as many times that the approach is quite different with cues taking on more tension through accelerated tempi and even more aggressive playing from the orchestra. The additional cues not on the original album or in the film, are more than I could have ever hoped for making this an exceptional release for me.

I've always felt this was one of the best examples of a combined orchestral and electronic score. The electronics really help reflect and magnify the atmosphere of the movie in a way that fits in with the orchestra in a natural, seamless way. I don't really care for the Boddicker source cues preferring the Goldsmith ones, so I can reprogram disc one swapping them out. I agree with rickO that they sound a lot like music from the 80s which is the reason they don't really work for me. They should represent something with a less familiar sound since they are meant to come from an unknown future. That's just one of the things I like about being given as much of the material as possible, if you wish you can re-sequence an album in a way that best suits your tastes and sensibilities---you have the option. Plus, here you get the original album sequencing as well, the best of both worlds.

And as always, FSM's rich and informative liner notes (here Jeff and Lukas) are tops. Grand Slam Lukas!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 10:50 AM   
 By:   rickO   (Member)

This was one of my favorite scores when it came out and I played the LP to death, so having this new release from FSM is just plain fantastic. This will sit nicely on the shelf next to Intrada's superlative Alien set as a companion piece.

The score tracks at times are very similar to the album tracks, however there are just as many times that the approach is quite different with cues taking on more tension through accelerated tempi and even more aggressive playing from the orchestra. The additional cues not on the original album or in the film, are more than I could have ever hoped for making this an exceptional release for me.

I've always felt this was one of the best examples of a combined orchestral and electronic score. The electronics really help reflect and magnify the atmosphere of the movie in a way that fits in with the orchestra in a natural, seamless way. I don't really care for the Boddicker source cues preferring the Goldsmith ones, so I can reprogram disc one swapping them out. I agree with rickO that they sound a lot like music from the 80s which is the reason they don't really work for me. They should represent something with a less familiar sound since they are meant to come from an unknown future. That's just one of the things I like about being given as much of the material as possible, if you wish you can re-sequence an album in a way that best suits your tastes and sensibilities---you have the option. Plus, here you get the original album sequencing as well, the best of both worlds.

And as always, FSM's rich and informative liner notes (here Jeff and Lukas) are tops. Grand Slam Lukas!


If the movie had been made today, the source music would probably sound like Lady Gaga, LOL. The time period a movie is made always reflects the time period in which the movie takes place, even historical movies. Whether it's the music, the actors or the special effects. It's interesting "time" filters through everything.

-Rick O.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2010 - 12:44 AM   
 By:   Spymaster   (Member)

Received this yesterday. It's absolutely stunning! Been a fan of the movie and the older LP/CD for absolutely ever so this is going to get a LOT of plays over a LOT of years!!

Thanks guys!!

I do have one teeny-tiny question. The film version of "The Showdown" differs quite significantly from the version on this set. The first 41 seconds are the same but then the film version veers off into an edited version of "Early Arrival". It works like gangbusters in the film but I was always puzzed why Goldsmith would re-use something from earlier in the score for such a pivotal moment, short of it being a time thing. Now it turns out that he created a completely different cue - but apparently it wasn't used. There's no mention about the creation of the film version anywhere in the liner notes (as far as I can see) which is very strange considering the detail elsewhere...

Was the film version of "The Showdown" created editorially?

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2010 - 5:26 AM   
 By:   Neil S. Bulk   (Member)

Page 9 of the notes addresses "The Showdown". It was another Morton Steven's re-score and it could not be located.

Neil

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2010 - 5:55 AM   
 By:   Bill Cooke   (Member)



Fantastic release! I burned my own version incorporating the Goldsmith source cues, which I think mesh better with the surrounding score and make for a better listening experience. I also added in some of the bonus tracks where they were intended to play in the film sequence, plus I opted for the original main title. Accidentally, I left on the film version of the main title, but I kind of like how these two tracks play together.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2010 - 7:54 AM   
 By:   Spymaster   (Member)

Page 9 of the notes addresses "The Showdown". It was another Morton Steven's re-score and it could not be located.
Neil


I read in the notes about a missing version of "The Showdown", but the notes say it's a shorter version of the cue that's included. It's certainly not just shorter, it's completely different.

I was surprised by Goldsmith's original take on the scene - it's almost an afterthought. It kind of goes nicely with Connery's "Oh fuck it!" before he swings at Sheppard. I must synch the cue to the film to see/hear how it plays.

I like the film version too - especially since "Early Arrival" itself didn't appear - but if it was indeed another Stevens' re-score then no biggie! :-)

A magnificent release!!

Outland, The Goonies, Star Trek III, Beyond Thunderdome - what a bloody fantastic year!! :-)

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2010 - 9:43 AM   
 By:   mark ford   (Member)


If the movie had been made today, the source music would probably sound like Lady Gaga, LOL. The time period a movie is made always reflects the time period in which the movie takes place, even historical movies. Whether it's the music, the actors or the special effects. It's interesting "time" filters through everything.

-Rick O.


I agree with you Rick. What I was trying to get at in my post was that I preferred Goldsmith's source cues because it seemed he was trying to project what he imagined future music might sound like in his cues and not filter them through the then current day musical sensibilities (compound meters and rhythms aren't the stuff of contemporary dance music even today). Going with a contemporary sound may make it easier for the audience to relate to, but it isn't the same thing as trying to create something that tries to best represent the time period, even an imagined one, of the film. Either approach is valid and I just personally prefer the composer's approach here as it fits his overall vision of the future and doesn't take me out of the listening experience as much with contemporary sensibilities.

Goldsmith did something similar in Logan's Run and many hate his futuristic sounding electronics as a stand alone listen, but I think they served the film quite well and would have been less effective and less true to the subject matter if they had sounded like 70's music. And yes, some of them make for a rough listening experience on their own!

Good topic of discussion and a heck of a score!

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2010 - 10:51 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

I'm on my second listen of Disc 1, this is an amazing score. Lots of Goldsmith gems, at times very reminiscent of the quieter moments in "Great Train Robbery" and "Final Conflict", which I both love. The action cues are superb and I even like the Michael Boddicker source cues. They have a Carpenter'esque quality.

The theme heard in "The Message/Final Message" still remains my favorite and it's great to get that main title intact. This release is right up there with Intrada's Alien IMO.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2010 - 1:25 PM   
 By:   gone   (Member)

Is the DVD of Outland as bad as reviewers say... with respect to a terrible image transfer?

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2010 - 1:45 PM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

Is the DVD of Outland as bad as reviewers say... with respect to a terrible image transfer?

I don't think it's necessarily bad. It's just an old DVD from '97 or '98 when DVDs were brand new babies. Watching it today, it probably looks cruddy compared to DVDs produced in recent years.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2010 - 1:46 PM   
 By:   Adam B.   (Member)

Is the DVD of Outland as bad as reviewers say... with respect to a terrible image transfer?

I have the DVD and it's certainly decent quality. It's a no-frills disc. No commentary or special features to speak of, but the picture quality isn't bad in my opinion.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2010 - 1:48 PM   
 By:   Neil S. Bulk   (Member)

Is the DVD of Outland as bad as reviewers say... with respect to a terrible image transfer?

Sadly it is. It's an old 4x3 transfer that was used for the widescreen laser disc, released around 1991. I think the package might say it's 16x9 enhanced, but don't believe it.

There is a gorgeous HD transfer that has been shown on cable. Hopefully that will turn up on video sooner rather than later.

Neil

 
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