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 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 6:13 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

So, between my post and Cody1949's post, and Bruce's replies,
can we assume that this CD-set will be devoted to scores for the
films of Henry King???

(King is the only director common to both our lists.)


I see your original post and your list actually consists of directors whose last name is from N to Z. Then you gave examples. I think when he said his director was on your list he meant the former.


Morricone.....

My N-Z list you reference was about COMPOSERS:

.....Can the first letter of the last name of the composer be found somewhere between N and Z of the alphabet.....so Newman, Previn, Raksin, Riddle, Steiner, Waxman, Webb, Young, etc.....????.....

My later list about directors referenced King, Koster, and Negulesco. I also said in the director's post that the scores were probably in the '40s-'50s period. I realize now that the years reference was what Bruce only answered to, not the directors mentioned, but we couldn't know that at the time.

It doesn't matter, anyway. We'll have a wonderful CD and maybe later we'll get some of the Alfred Newman of the other guesses.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 6:19 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

It's not Henry King or Joseph Mankiewicz this time. Perhaps in the future. Anyway, I am definitely on board for this release. Thanks, Bruce.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 6:19 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....You are completely accurate all the way down the line. The Newman complicated connection is, of course, Where the Sidewalk Ends, which he conducted and which uses Street Scene by him. The non-Street Scene music, of which there is much, is by Cyril J. Mockridge and is fantastic. The other scores, of course, are all by Raksin. Daisy Kenyon has almost no music in the film, so it is the shortest, Whirlpool is the longest (and is absolutely incredible) and Where the Sidewalk Ends and Fallen Angel both substantial scores. All in great sound......


All sounds wonderful. Look forward to it.

I am a bit confused, though. Didn't we just get the LAURA SUITE - THEMES AND VARIATIONS as a bonus piece at the end of the new LAURA release? Or is this something new and different?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 6:30 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

.....You are completely accurate all the way down the line. The Newman complicated connection is, of course, Where the Sidewalk Ends, which he conducted and which uses Street Scene by him. The non-Street Scene music, of which there is much, is by Cyril J. Mockridge and is fantastic. The other scores, of course, are all by Raksin. Daisy Kenyon has almost no music in the film, so it is the shortest, Whirlpool is the longest (and is absolutely incredible) and Where the Sidewalk Ends and Fallen Angel both substantial scores. All in great sound......


All sounds wonderful. Look forward to it.

I am a bit confused, though. Didn't we just get the LAURA SUITE - THEMES AND VARIATIONS as a bonus piece at the end of the new LAURA release? Or is this something new and different?


Same piece. We just wanted to include something from Laura, but not our complete version - the suite is for those who missed ours and just love that music - we wouldn't have felt right about not including something from Laura.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 6:32 PM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

.....You are completely accurate all the way down the line. The Newman complicated connection is, of course, Where the Sidewalk Ends, which he conducted and which uses Street Scene by him. The non-Street Scene music, of which there is much, is by Cyril J. Mockridge and is fantastic. The other scores, of course, are all by Raksin. Daisy Kenyon has almost no music in the film, so it is the shortest, Whirlpool is the longest (and is absolutely incredible) and Where the Sidewalk Ends and Fallen Angel both substantial scores. All in great sound......


All sounds wonderful. Look forward to it.

I am a bit confused, though. Didn't we just get the LAURA SUITE - THEMES AND VARIATIONS as a bonus piece at the end of the new LAURA release? Or is this something new and different?


Its the same. from above:

"Five scores on two CDs - Forever Amber is owned in perpetuity by Varese, BTW. No, the films included in our set are pretty much all of a piece. I think you can guess that one of the five is Laura, but only the Suite - Theme and Variations. "

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 6:52 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

The Preminger set is a must have for me. Can't get enough of those film noir scores. And Bruce, with these Golden Age releases you're not only turning me onto the scores but the films as well. For example, I watched Summer and Smoke and How Green Was My Valley for the first time shortly after acquiring each of those scores and loved them both. After ordering A Place in the Sun from you, I picked up the DVD from the library and will watch it for the first time this weekend (the CD should arrive tomorrow). There are other examples, but I've rambled on long enough. Long story short: thanks and keep 'em coming!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 7:00 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

The Preminger set is a must have for me. Can't get enough of those film noir scores. And Bruce, with these Golden Age releases you're not only turning me onto the scores but the films as well. For example, I watched Summer and Smoke and How Green Was My Valley for the first time shortly after acquiring each of those scores and loved them both. After ordering A Place in the Sun from you, I picked up the DVD from the library and will watch it for the first time this weekend (the CD should arrive tomorrow). There are other examples, but I've rambled on long enough. Long story short: thanks and keep 'em coming!

The good news is that all five of the films included here are on DVD under the Fox Noir banner - Laura, of course, has also been released on Blu-ray. I can't recommend the other four films highly enough. Preminger was a great director and continued to make interesting films all the way up to Skidoo, after which he just got too weird for the room. But I love Man With the Golden Arm and Bonjour Tristesse and Anatomy of a Murder and Saint Joan (yes, Saint Joan) and Exodus and Advise and Consent and In Harm's Way and The Cardinal and Bunny Lake is Missing. He also had amazing taste in composers - when you think of who he hired, taking chances on people who were just coming up - he was a visionary in that regard: Raksin, Elmer Bernstein, Georges Auric, Mischa Spoliansky, Duke Ellington, Ernest Gold, Jerry Goldsmith, Jerry Fielding, Jerome Moross, Paul Glass and on and on. Some of my all-time favorite scores are for Preminger films.

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 7:07 PM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

The Preminger set is a must have for me. Can't get enough of those film noir scores. And Bruce, with these Golden Age releases you're not only turning me onto the scores but the films as well. For example, I watched Summer and Smoke and How Green Was My Valley for the first time shortly after acquiring each of those scores and loved them both. After ordering A Place in the Sun from you, I picked up the DVD from the library and will watch it for the first time this weekend (the CD should arrive tomorrow). There are other examples, but I've rambled on long enough. Long story short: thanks and keep 'em coming!

The good news is that all five of the films included here are on DVD under the Fox Noir banner - Laura, of course, has also been released on Blu-ray. I can't recommend the other four films highly enough. Preminger was a great director and continued to make interesting films all the way up to Skidoo, after which he just got too weird for the room. But I love Man With the Golden Arm and Bonjour Tristesse and Anatomy of a Murder and Saint Joan (yes, Saint Joan) and Exodus and Advise and Consent and In Harm's Way and The Cardinal and Bunny Lake is Missing. He also had amazing taste in composers - when you think of who he hired, taking chances on people who were just coming up - he was a visionary in that regard: Raksin, Elmer Bernstein, Georges Auric, Mischa Spoliansky, Duke Ellington, Ernest Gold, Jerry Goldsmith, Jerry Fielding, Jerome Moross, Paul Glass and on and on. Some of my all-time favorite scores are for Preminger films.


Any chance that we could ever see an expanded ADVISE AND CONSENT, with all the weird gay bar music and maybe even Sinatra's awful song included? Jerry Fielding's very first film score (right off the black list), and what a masterpiece of scoring! I even love the source cues!

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 7:16 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

The Preminger set is a must have for me. Can't get enough of those film noir scores. And Bruce, with these Golden Age releases you're not only turning me onto the scores but the films as well. For example, I watched Summer and Smoke and How Green Was My Valley for the first time shortly after acquiring each of those scores and loved them both. After ordering A Place in the Sun from you, I picked up the DVD from the library and will watch it for the first time this weekend (the CD should arrive tomorrow). There are other examples, but I've rambled on long enough. Long story short: thanks and keep 'em coming!

The good news is that all five of the films included here are on DVD under the Fox Noir banner - Laura, of course, has also been released on Blu-ray. I can't recommend the other four films highly enough. Preminger was a great director and continued to make interesting films all the way up to Skidoo, after which he just got too weird for the room. But I love Man With the Golden Arm and Bonjour Tristesse and Anatomy of a Murder and Saint Joan (yes, Saint Joan) and Exodus and Advise and Consent and In Harm's Way and The Cardinal and Bunny Lake is Missing. He also had amazing taste in composers - when you think of who he hired, taking chances on people who were just coming up - he was a visionary in that regard: Raksin, Elmer Bernstein, Georges Auric, Mischa Spoliansky, Duke Ellington, Ernest Gold, Jerry Goldsmith, Jerry Fielding, Jerome Moross, Paul Glass and on and on. Some of my all-time favorite scores are for Preminger films.


Oh yeah, Laura is another one that I watched for the first time after acquiring your CD, and another instant fave. I'll be checking out the others you mentioned as well (the only other one I've seen is Man With the Golden Arm, which is gut-wrenching but fantastic). With scattered exceptions, I've all but completely lost interest in modern movies, so I really appreciate these recommendations. The past is the new future!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 7:33 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

Otto Preminger must have liked working with Dana Andrews. With the exception of Whirlpool, he's in all the films. Bruce,you could have called it Scores From the Films of Dana Andrews Minus One.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 7:44 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Otto Preminger must have liked working with Dana Andrews. With the exception of Whirlpool, he's in all the films. Bruce,you could have called it Scores From the Films of Dana Andrews Minus One.

I know - he loved Dana, who was such a unique and wonderful actor, not only in these films, but especially in The Best Years of Our Lives.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 8:02 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

He was a country boy from Mississippi who excelled in playing urban roles. A thoroughly underrated actor who was perfect for film noir.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 8:12 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)


Wow! Yet another GREAT release Bruce! I love both film noir movies and their scores. Can't wait to get this 2 cd set. Many thanks! smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 8:53 PM   
 By:   Ed   (Member)

Preminger noir? A must-have! Of course David Raksin is one of may favorites, too.

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 8:58 PM   
 By:   Essankay   (Member)

Preminger + Noir = Excellent news! A little music, maestro, please, for the red-meat crime cycle and make it a quintuple feature.

While I'm happy to hear about this - another winner from Kritzerland - my beleaguered pocketbook is about to cry uncle. (Although if you make it a package deal with SAINT JOAN I might really put the squeeze on that squawking wallet, Mr. Kimmel!)


I can never get Columbia to even have the courtesy to return e-mails. It's a little irritating but nothing to be done about it, I suppose. After a year and a half of trying to get the gentleman in charge to give more than a sporadic cursory response, I gave up.

This news does not make me happy, however, because it means you won't be bringing us WALK ON THE WILD SIDE which is the holy grail chez Essankay.

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 10:33 PM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

This news does not make me happy, however, because it means you won't be bringing us WALK ON THE WILD SIDE which is the holy grail chez Essankay.

And how amazing would it be to have WALK ON THE WILD SIDE in a dual presentation a la Intrada's THE CARPETBAGGERS -- one disc of original tracks and the second containing the Ava/Choreo LP in pristine stereo? Previous CD releases of the LP program have been awful sounding, tracks misnamed, probably b**ts though I can't say for sure.

 
 Posted:   Jul 26, 2013 - 12:22 AM   
 By:   Essankay   (Member)

And how amazing would it be to have WALK ON THE WILD SIDE in a dual presentation a la Intrada's THE CARPETBAGGERS -- one disc of original tracks and the second containing the Ava/Choreo LP in pristine stereo?

Such a thing would definitely be fab. For now, though, I will content myself with the thought of five straight shots of Otto noir. And that's a heady brew!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 26, 2013 - 1:49 AM   
 By:   Stefan Schlegel   (Member)

You are completely accurate all the way down the line. The Newman complicated connection is, of course, Where the Sidewalk Ends, which he conducted and which uses Street Scene by him. The non-Street Scene music, of which there is much, is by Cyril J. Mockridge and is fantastic. The other scores, of course, are all by Raksin. Daisy Kenyon has almost no music in the film, so it is the shortest, Whirlpool is the longest (and is absolutely incredible) and Where the Sidewalk Ends and Fallen Angel both substantial scores. All in great sound.

Unbelievable! What a wonderful release. I would not have thought that all these Raksin scores for the Preminger movies from the 40s do still exist.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 26, 2013 - 10:24 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

When does the Preminger noir CD get officially announced for ordering?


(.....and those all look like strong, adult movies. Do you have to be over 18 to order? smile )

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 26, 2013 - 10:28 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

You are completely accurate all the way down the line. The Newman complicated connection is, of course, Where the Sidewalk Ends, which he conducted and which uses Street Scene by him. The non-Street Scene music, of which there is much, is by Cyril J. Mockridge and is fantastic. The other scores, of course, are all by Raksin. Daisy Kenyon has almost no music in the film, so it is the shortest, Whirlpool is the longest (and is absolutely incredible) and Where the Sidewalk Ends and Fallen Angel both substantial scores. All in great sound.

Unbelievable! What a wonderful release. I would not have thought that all these Raksin scores for the Preminger movies from the 40s do still exist.


I knew the stuff existed but no one thinks David Raksin sells and to an extent they're right. But I knew him, he was a brilliant composer, and I'll always do David Raksin no matter what. Laura will always sell, but the others in this set are iffy - but Nick and I felt that doing the set this way was the right way to go and we just hope it sells. We were talking last night and for both of us it's probably going to be our favorite of the year.

 
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