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 Posted:   May 19, 2013 - 6:19 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Some day down the road it would be awesome for individual releases to come out for people who couldn't quite afford this set. Or downloads of individual scores or tracks for discerning fans?

-Rick O.


Surely that will happen some time in the future, long after the box set has sold out. This music is an asset that will still be good for modest, niche revenues as a download.

At least you'd think so, depending on how much trouble the studio considers it to create the download version. It seems that all pop music but only some film music has made the leap to iTunes.


Don't forget there was a special licensing agreement between (at least) three entities to get the box set to market. Depending on rights issues a DL version may or may not be possible.

 
 Posted:   May 19, 2013 - 6:27 PM   
 By:   Verity   (Member)

Six months later, and I still come back to this release every day for a listen. Some days I'll take on an episode or two - other days I just hit "random" and see what comes up. Like others have expressed in this thread, I still am gobsmacked that this release ever saw the light of day. So many people to thank in helping to make this possible.

Bliss, thy name is "Star Trek: The Original Series Soundtrack Collection." wink

 
 Posted:   Jun 7, 2013 - 1:59 PM   
 By:   Other Tallguy   (Member)

I've started hacking up my TOS Box tracks. I noticed when I went through the first twelve discs on my road trip that it was hard to tell sometimes what episode I was listening to and if I was listening to a library cue or what. (Mostly a season 2 / 3 problem because of how it's arranged.)

Now I'm using the episode as album and I'm including the library cues / alternates etc at the end of each with a note in the track title - eg. "Zap the Spaceship (Charlie X S2 Library cond. Courage)"

The goal is that when a track comes up on my iPod I should be able to identify what the episode is, who the composer is, and if it's a library, alternate, what have you.

Not sure if I'm going to give the episodes with one or two tracks their own album. I guess it doesn't hurt and their mostly things I won't listen to much anyway. (The Apple, Wolf in the Fold for examples.)

The last touch I'm considering is what to do with the Main and End Titles. I'm leaning towards putting a copy on each album (episode). If I leave it as is then I have titles on about every third or fourth episode. I could group them all into their own album. That would make them easy to find, but I'd never listen to them that way.

In a truly first world problem I'm debating just opening each album with titles or putting them after the teaser music when appropriate. I'll end the main takes with the Closing Titles and the Desilu / Paramount IDs and then go into library / alt / outtake / sound FX / whatever.

What I have discovered by doing this is how distinctive Courage's conducting is where he conducts Steiner's and Fried's music. He definitely takes it a shade darker. Which is impressive on Ruk Attacks.

Six months on and I'm still loving this set.

 
 Posted:   Jun 7, 2013 - 6:38 PM   
 By:   BornOfAJackal   (Member)

Other Tallguy, I generally put the scores into episode albums on iTunes. Except in the case of really short scores like PATTERNS OF FORCE, THE OMEGA GLORY, etc., where I leave them with the additional cue roundups from their respective season.

As to complete naming for ID on iPod purposes, I used the track names and reel/slate numbers that were released earlier in this thread by La-La Land. And I am never at a loss for what's playing. A caveat: add the conductor and/or arranger for maximum completeness.

Yours in Trekdom,
Chris

 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2013 - 6:36 AM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

Has everyone seen this detergent commercial that used music from "Amok Time"?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l96aDWIbn48

Note the artful care with which the music was edited into the ad. It shows how much they respected the material.

I wonder what their source was for the music itself. I don't think they got to the master tapes that LLL ended up using years later.

 
 Posted:   Oct 9, 2013 - 9:38 AM   
 By:   Bishop   (Member)

Does anybody know who provided the vocals for "Goodnight, Sweetheart (vocal)" from "City on the Edge of Forever"?
Somehow I seem to be completely unable to find this piece of information ...

 
 Posted:   Oct 9, 2013 - 12:19 PM   
 By:   Other Tallguy   (Member)

I'd have to comb through this lengthy and aged thread, but I believe that someone (Lukas?) said that the singer is unknown.

Helluva recording, though. Of course I have no experience of the song outside of Star Trek.

 
 Posted:   Oct 9, 2013 - 2:50 PM   
 By:   Jeff Bond   (Member)

I recall that detergent commercial but I don't recall the Amok Time music being used in it (or the quote from Spock near the end)--I have a feeling that was messed with after the fact.

 
 Posted:   Oct 9, 2013 - 2:52 PM   
 By:   Bishop   (Member)

Thanks for the head's up, pal! smile

I've now been able to locate big LK's posting on this matter (page 160 or so) and it seems that not all is yet lost ...

That's a good grouping. Two "western" scores on one disc.


Guys, this was asked a while ago but not answered:

Do we know who the vocalist was on "Goodnight Sweetheart"?


Not yet, we'll find out, I hope and presume, when La La Land settles up with SAG on the reuse for the studio singers like this. Please be patient, thanks!

Lukas


So Lukas, how much longer do we have to be patient? wink

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2013 - 10:39 AM   
 By:   Bishop   (Member)

And another question ...

The Source Music from "The Squire of Gothos" is identified in the booklet as "A Major Sonata" and "F Minor Sonata" (both by Domenico Scarlatti).

Yet it seems the first is actually the "Sonata in C Major, K. 159" [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aydlQ_jCrQ], while the second is "The Sonata in G minor, K.450" [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q77sfHTzDKw].

So is this just a little misprint (No biggie at all and quite understandable with such a big projectt), or is there an actual story behind the name change? smile

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2013 - 11:08 AM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)


Bishop, I don't have the answers to your question. We relied on the cue sheet ID of the classical pieces, we should have verified them with our own ears as you did. Regarding the singer for "Goodnight, Sweetheart" I don't know and I have to pick my battles as far as pushing people to research things. It occurs to me I could just make up a name and no one would know the difference though...

Lukas

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2013 - 12:23 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

The Source Music from "The Squire of Gothos" is identified in the booklet as "A Major Sonata" and "F Minor Sonata" (both by Domenico Scarlatti). Yet...

Maybe, on his cue sheets, Wilbur Hatch was referring to the former as 'a major sonata' ('a' being a descriptive rather than a musical annotation) and perhaps, with the latter, he could have been abbreviating his displeasure with the cue? (kidding)

It occurs to me I could just make up a name...

Lukas, I'd like to nominate 'T.J. Heffenpheffeur' as the 'Goodnight, Sweetheart' vocalist (also kidding).

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2013 - 12:43 PM   
 By:   Saul Pincus   (Member)

Lukas, I'd like to nominate 'T.J. Heffenpheffeur' as the 'Goodnight, Sweetheart' vocalist (also kidding).

Seconded! (LOL.)

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2013 - 1:15 PM   
 By:   Accidental Genius   (Member)

Helluva recording, though. Of course I have no experience of the song outside of Star Trek.

You know, there's another STAR TREK connection to this song - Brent Spiner sings it on his OL' YELLOW EYES IS BACK album. I doubt, although I'm of course not sure, that Brent knew the previous TREK connection. Cool!

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2013 - 2:24 PM   
 By:   Bishop   (Member)

Bishop, I don't have the answers to your question. We relied on the cue sheet ID of the classical pieces, we should have verified them with our own ears as you did. Regarding the singer for "Goodnight, Sweetheart" I don't know and I have to pick my battles as far as pushing people to research things. It occurs to me I could just make up a name and no one would know the difference though...

Lukas


Lukas, you're the man!
You (& the La-La Land Gang along with some friends) brought this fantastic set to us.
It's an unbelievable music treasure box and that's what matters most.

All additional information are just icing on the cake.

And in fact you've just given me all the additional info I really needed:
  • Actual source of the track names
  • Name of singer is (and will be) a mystery

    All that is fine and i can now go on and close my personal file on this. wink

    Bishop

  •  
     Posted:   Oct 10, 2013 - 3:13 PM   
     By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)


    Well...glad I sort of helped. The cue titles for the vast majority of the set were verified by yours truly from the actual composer sketches and/or orchestrations, as the cue sheets had a lot of errors that had been repeated on past albums, books, etc. (e.g. "Warp One" --> "Wrap One"). But for the Gothos source music all we had were the cue sheets.

    Lukas

     
     Posted:   Oct 10, 2013 - 11:16 PM   
     By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

    The Source Music from "The Squire of Gothos" is identified in the booklet as "A Major Sonata" and "F Minor Sonata" (both by Domenico Scarlatti).

    Yet it seems the first is actually the "Sonata in C Major, K. 159" [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aydlQ_jCrQ].



    I have the first Scarlatti piece on CD. It's performed on piano by Nelly Kokinos and identified as "Sonata in C, L. 104." The disc is Schroeder's Greatest Hits (1992).

    Maybe there are two competing catalogs, as there are in astronomy (NGC vs. M), and Scarlatti's K. 159 is the same thing as L. 104. I honestly don't think Schroeder would get it wrong.

     
     Posted:   Oct 11, 2013 - 1:47 AM   
     By:   Bishop   (Member)

    The Source Music from "The Squire of Gothos" is identified in the booklet as "A Major Sonata" and "F Minor Sonata" (both by Domenico Scarlatti).

    Yet it seems the first is actually the "Sonata in C Major, K. 159" [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aydlQ_jCrQ].



    I have the first Scarlatti piece on CD. It's performed on piano by Nelly Kokinos and identified as "Sonata in C, L. 104." The disc is Schroeder's Greatest Hits (1992).

    Maybe there are two competing catalogs, as there are in astronomy (NGC vs. M), and Scarlatti's K. 159 is the same thing as L. 104. I honestly don't think Schroeder would get it wrong.


    Hi Zap,

    thanks a lot for confirming my original posting!

    And you're absolutely right: K. 159 is indeed the same thing as L. 104. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_solo_keyboard_sonatas_by_Domenico_Scarlatti)

    The problem I had with the booklet was more the key(?) in which the both sonatas were supposed to be written ( A vs. C / F vs. G )

     
     Posted:   Oct 11, 2013 - 5:37 AM   
     By:   Other Tallguy   (Member)

    The Source Music from "The Squire of Gothos" is identified in the booklet as "A Major Sonata" and "F Minor Sonata" (both by Domenico Scarlatti).

    Yet it seems the first is actually the "Sonata in C Major, K. 159" [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aydlQ_jCrQ].



    I have the first Scarlatti piece on CD. It's performed on piano by Nelly Kokinos and identified as "Sonata in C, L. 104." The disc is Schroeder's Greatest Hits (1992).

    Maybe there are two competing catalogs, as there are in astronomy (NGC vs. M), and Scarlatti's K. 159 is the same thing as L. 104. I honestly don't think Schroeder would get it wrong.


    Hi Zap,

    thanks a lot for confirming my original posting!

    And you're absolutely right: K. 159 is indeed the same thing as L. 104. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_solo_keyboard_sonatas_by_Domenico_Scarlatti)

    The problem I had with the booklet was more the key(?) in which the both sonatas were supposed to be written ( A vs. C / F vs. G )


    Now I know what people feel like when I'm talking about the differences between the first pilot Enterprise, the second pilot, and the production models. smile

     
     Posted:   Oct 11, 2013 - 6:47 AM   
     By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)

    I recall that detergent commercial but I don't recall the Amok Time music being used in it (or the quote from Spock near the end)--I have a feeling that was messed with after the fact.

    It was. The original ad is also on YouTube and there is no trace of this music or Spock's quote. Wouldn't they have to pay for all of this usage? Seems too expensive a proposition for a commercial that doesn't directly reference Star Trek, instead going for more vague similarities. Note also the 80's ST movie transporter sound. The music was actually pretty sloppily edited and cut off. As the kids say: FAIL!

     
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