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 Posted:   Nov 14, 2013 - 5:22 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

A composer steeped in Greek Orthodox mysticism. He once differentiated his style of music from more popular commercial music as 'the music of the self, as opposed to that of the ego'.

Yes, he sure talked a great game.

Personally, I have to agree with David Hurwitz:

http://www.classicstoday.com/review/review-5834/

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 14, 2013 - 9:05 AM   
 By:   eriknelson   (Member)

Yesterday I received the newest issue of BBC Music magazine. It features Tavener on the cover and contains his 70th birthday interview. How ironic.

The accompanying CD contains a recording of The Protecting Veil, performed by Steven Isserlis and the BBC Symphony conducted by Gennady Rozhdestvensky.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 14, 2013 - 11:05 AM   
 By:   Mikal   (Member)

I only just heard of John Tavener about a year and a half ago, after being awe-stricken by the placement of Funeral Canticle in The Tree of Life. There have been few films which have affected me as profoundly on a first viewing, as that film did, due in no small part to Tavener's music (other than "Lacrimosa 2" by Zbigniew Preisner, it was probably my favorite piece used in the film). I hope his passing was quick and he didn't suffer.

 
 Posted:   Nov 14, 2013 - 11:19 AM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Along with Part & Gorecki he pioneered a new form of religious/spiritual music - some have called it "mystic minimalism".
Whatever the name , it will remembered as the defining form of late 20th Century classical music.
bruce
x 3

See, Bruce - divine providence. That'll teach you to mock me on this type of thread.


Forgive us our sins
bruce

 
 Posted:   Nov 14, 2013 - 11:20 AM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

A composer steeped in Greek Orthodox mysticism. He once differentiated his style of music from more popular commercial music as 'the music of the self, as opposed to that of the ego'.

Yes, he sure talked a great game.

Personally, I have to agree with David Hurwitz:

http://www.classicstoday.com/review/review-5834/


Is "david Hurwitz" a nom de plume for John Simon.
Seriously, calling Taverner "Johnny Boy"
???!!!!
brm

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 14, 2013 - 1:17 PM   
 By:   John McMasters   (Member)

NPR has a feature on Mr. Tavener:

http://www.npr.org/blogs/deceptivecadence/2013/11/12/244788638/remembering-holy-minimalist-composer-john-tavener

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 15, 2013 - 9:03 AM   
 By:   Mikal   (Member)

Along with Part & Gorecki he pioneered a new form of religious/spiritual music - some have called it "mystic minimalism".
Whatever the name , it will remembered as the defining form of late 20th Century classical music.
bruce


What's funny about this, is pieces by Pärt and Górecki are featured in Terrence Malick's follow-up to The Tree of Life, To the Wonder. He knows what he's doing. razz

 
 Posted:   Nov 16, 2013 - 8:27 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Personally, I have to agree with David Hurwitz:

http://www.classicstoday.com/review/review-5834/





Well, y'know, this isn't the time, at an obituary.


The problem is, that every composer needs a strategy to fill the blank page. Film composers don't have to think WHAT they're composing about, beyond the screenplay under their noses. Tippett too used a 'Jungian' (HIS WORD, NOT MINE) approach in terms of EXPLAINING what he wrote, and it gave him an excuse for any particular piece, like 'The Masques of Time' but whether that reflects some 'reality' of the composer is something else. You have to write about something, and music is only a pointer to other things, not the things themselves.

If he was genuine in his Eastern Orthodox mysticism, then he'd want to express that in his music probably, and it's a tall order. When he says he's not using 'western' styles, he's referring to something a bit more fundamental than modal and compositional styles. He's talking about composing IN THAT MINDSET, which is different, it doesn't have to come out like Zorba the Monk. The transcendent and multi-dimensional can't REALLY be described in space/time music, only hinted at in musical metaphors... musical equivalents of visual icons as he would see it. As for the 'cliches' thing, well, as all film music afficionados know, you can't really avoid them if you want to express, and sometimes the need to avoid the cliches stems from not much more than ego anyhow.

Ultimately, it'll depend on his sincerity and the listener's taste.

 
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