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 Posted:   Jan 7, 2014 - 10:53 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

What does SEVEN DAYS TO NOON and BENEATH THE PLANET OF THE APES have in common?

Written by Paul Dehn, I believe...? Which takes us nicely back to the first question posted!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2014 - 5:30 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

TO GRAHAM- Yes GEORGES DELERUE is the answer, now as for your question does this answer only include feature lenght films?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2014 - 5:55 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Well this is a bit of a hard question-FRANX WAXMAN- DR JEKYLL AND MR HYDE-41-MONTY NORMAN-THE TWO FACES OF DR JEKYLL[HOUSE OF FRIGHT]-60-CARL DAVIS-I MONSTER-71-BOB COBERT-ABC TV MOVIE-FEATURE LENGTH-Which leaves Jerry Goldsmith and James Bernard. I know James Bernard scored episodes of that Hammer TV show HAMMER HOUSE OF HORROR of the early 80's I can't vouch there might have been one episode in there that deals with the Jekyll Hyde scenario, although I doubt it since those episodes mostly were dealing with contemporary themes. James Bernard feature length scores does not list any Jekyll Hyde films as any Hammer fan would know. That leaves Jerry Goldsmith-a possible TV show with a DR Jekyll/hyde theme? so the question is are we talking about TV shows as well?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2014 - 5:55 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

delete

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2014 - 3:56 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Yup, dan - as I said in my original post "TV and film versions". No cheating! Jump in everybody with the wrong answer, because that's part of the party! (I gave "Ernest Gold" as the wrong answer on another thread, and it hasn't made me any worse a person).

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2014 - 4:58 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

It is either James Bernard or Jerry Goldsmith. One would think James Bernard would not be the answer, because of his association with the genre. But if this is an obscure film or TV show, and Jerry has done a lot more TV work then James I am going to say the answer is JAMES BERNARD who never did a Jekyll/ Hyde type film or show.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2014 - 7:32 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

While I wait to see if I am correct , here is a question- What does Jerry Goldsmith, Claude Bolling and Don Banks have in common in the horror genre?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 9, 2014 - 3:25 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Correct, dan! James Bernard never scored a Jekyll/ Hyde adaptatiton. Jerry Goldsmith did, way back in 1955 for TV's "Climax", which had Michael Rennie in the dual role. That must have been one of Goldsmith's first scores. It's on YouTube if you're interested.

As for your question, they all scored "Mummy" movies! (Banks: THE MUMMY'S SHROUD; Bolling: THE AWAKENING; Goldsmith: INDIANA JONES MEETS THE MUMMY).

Sorry, no time to post a new question. Carry on without me!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 9, 2014 - 4:26 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

Maybe TG would like a crack at this one before it becomes an anthology of questions? wink

TG = Torture Garden ( I was making out that TallGuy might like to have a try but I highlighted the letters as a clue because I'm a bloody smartass I am )

I mentioned 'anthology' ( because I'm a bloody smartass I am )

Bleedin' 'ell Timmer, I'm thick. Didn't click at all!





(A flash, followed by a swirl of reddish smoke)

OK, OK, you've said my name three times now, so here I am. Whaddya want?

TG


wink

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 9, 2014 - 7:33 AM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

TO GRAHAM- CORRECT AGAIN-3 mummy films.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 9, 2014 - 7:34 AM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

delete.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 9, 2014 - 5:25 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

I am a film composer who spent most of my career scoring low budget efforts in the 50's and early 60'sA good chunk of these films were horror scifi efforts and I was known to deliver scores that were striking and robust to say the least. A few of my most popular genre scores, I scored things that were very small and things that were very large.All from a certain low budget director who spent most of his career doing low budget genre films. My films were from a diverse amount of companies. From AIP to ALLIED ARTIST to UNITED ARTIST ETC ETC Who am I ?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2014 - 4:01 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Don't know, dan... I'm going to say "Paul Dunlap", because I want to show everyone that it's OK to be wrong.

Maybe we should make the questions easier once in a while so that we don't scare people away with our enormous Metaluna Mutant scrotums, I mean heads.

Anyone else playing?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2014 - 7:25 AM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Good guess, the answer was ALBERT GLASSER, who did dozens of film scores from the late 40's into the 60's for the most part. The low budget director was BERT I GORDON, The small, big things in films he scored included genre cult favorites like THE AMAZING COLOSSAL MAN, WAR OF THE COLOSSAL BEAST, ATTACK OF THE PUPPET PEOPLE, BEGINNING OF THE END, CYCLOPS ETC ETC.You knew pretty quick it was a MR Glasser score because they were often very dominant forces for the film. They were restless, strong scores and often melodic and memorable. My favorites of his includes THE AMAZING COLOSSAL MAN , BEGINNING OF THE END, Indestructible man, etc etc. Underrated composer. If you like Graham to keep this going, it would be nice, I will be going away for a few days, vacation, slot machines. When I get back I will make the questions easier. I am surprise there are not more people participating in this, we know there are genre fans on this board,

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2014 - 3:28 PM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Ah! I didn't think of Albert Glasser. After posting "Paul Dunlap" I suddenly thought it might be Ronald Stein. So I'd have been wrong twice. But we know that's no problem.

Whilst dan is away, let's see if anyone can solve this mischievous one... "Morris Jar" appeared on the credits as an actor in which horror film? He also wrote the score for the film, and is credited as such under his real name.

1) "Easy" - Which of his favourite composers was he paying homage to with the joke name?

2) "Not So Easy if You Don't Look at the Internet" - What's the real composer's name, and the film title?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 12, 2014 - 7:47 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

OK, either the above questions were too hard or nobody's looking at this thread. Sooooo, some klooze -

1) The composer who was getting a little nod from the other film composer was French, and his name really does sound a bit like "Morris Jar".

2) The film on which the other composer worked was marketed as a horror film, although it was more a brutal historical... "epic" (in inverted commas, because of the low budget). British film but American star. The director died very young, and the composer was only in his early 50s when he too died.


 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2014 - 2:53 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

To Graham- HORROR CHAMBER OF DR FAUSTUS-59- THE COMPOSER WAS MAURICE JARRE, I remember they made a big deal out of the operation that deals with plastic surgery for being so explicit for it's time. Matter of fact 5 decades later it is still a strong scene that is hard to take for some people. the last few days this thread has gotten over a hundred viewers. So maybe they don't know the answer.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2014 - 8:59 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

In the horror film music scene what do these 4 composers have in common- FRANZ WAXMAN , HANS SALTER, GIL MELLE, BOB COBERT?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 4:12 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

To Graham- HORROR CHAMBER OF DR FAUSTUS-59- THE COMPOSER WAS MAURICE JARRE, I remember they made a big deal out of the operation that deals with plastic surgery for being so explicit for it's time. Matter of fact 5 decades later it is still a strong scene that is hard to take for some people. the last few days this thread has gotten over a hundred viewers. So maybe they don't know the answer.

dan, not sure if you're answering the question there..., but the answer is WITCHFINDER GENERAL. Paul Ferris wrote the score, and had a bit part as an actor. He chose to be credited as Morris Jar, after his favourite film composer.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 4:15 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

In the horror film music scene what do these 4 composers have in common- FRANZ WAXMAN , HANS SALTER, GIL MELLE, BOB COBERT?

Well, because I don't want to cheat and look at the imdb or something, I might be wrong. But my guess is they all did Frankenstein films. Certainly Waxman, Salter and Mellé - but I can't place the Bob Cobert score. Was there a Dan Curtis movie about Frankenstein? Anyway, that's my answer. Am I right?

 
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