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 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 5:23 AM   
 By:   Spymaster   (Member)

I'm with Ron Burbella totally.

The music, notwithstanding, the sheer amount of information, analysis, opinion and art in many of today's CD booklets - art that gives sight to the sounds (and this music was written for a visual medium, remember) makes losing/archiving all of those hardcopies incomprehensible to me.

I'm old fashioned enough to want to play albums through from beginning to end, not jump around random tracks from random albums.

And limited storage helps me keep my CD collection to around 6000 - maximising quality as I control quantity.

I like CDs. I like physical media. I have no need for iTunes.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 6:12 AM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

I am as guilty as anyone for starting this trend (Omega Man 2.0) but really, the labels need to show some discipline and not just repackage the same stuff over and over. I don't know how you guys stand for it. I would feel ripped off, seriously.

Lukas


That's the way I used to feel, as a collector. But in the end, I am happy to be able to purchase scores I missed out on previous incarnations (recently, The Blue Max by La-La Land). And it would be sad not to reprint previous limited editions, as I hope the film score fanbase is not static and some newcomers are discovering this field everyday. In the end, I think all the labels'work will end up in digital form only one day, and it will then be available to everyone anytime, except if marketing succeeds in creating some false sense of scarcity (by the way, I'm still waiting for Jurassic Park 20th Anniversary here in Europe *sigh*).



The reissues of reissues are fine by me, as said above, some folks missed out on release 1, or 1.5 or 2.0, and a reissue gives folks who just missed out or just got into movie music a chance to grab something they want.

I have the original Varese Robocop. I bought their slightly expanded reissue. Then comes Intrada's version and my thought was "I've got 2 of these damn things, pass". Now I wish I'd gotten it and tossed the old ones. I have the Varese Blue Max, and Intrada's version. They say the LaLa Land set is the one to have... I'm happy with Intrada.

And there's stuff like Night Crossing. The original CD was great but suffered from that horrible compression, while the reissue had breath-taking sound. Or First Blood... loved the original CD, but the 2 disc reissue is like night & day with the original. Did I double dip? Yep. But damn was it worth it.

I don't feel ripped off at all. If these reissues of reissues stop selling, labels will stop doing it.

And I keep music on my MP3 player, but I love having CDs on my shelves so I can pull out the liner notes, read and listen.


 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 7:10 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

I've never seen Vertical Limit but yes, it involves mountain climbers. I think Martin Campbell directed it - his first movie after GoldenEye. That is the extent of my knowledge on the subject.



He did The Mask Of Zorro in between, but no big deal.

 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 7:22 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Just a bit early for an Aprils Fools joke.

 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 7:27 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

In listening to MP3, all I can say is that is merely a reflection of the denuding of all things, everywhere.

 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 7:59 AM   
 By:   Maleficio   (Member)

It's nice to look at my CD collection on the wall and whatnot, but I never pull out a CD for playback. As soon as a CD arrives, it get's ripped and archived in a lossless format (FLAC) and away it goes.

I have all my music on one central hard-rive (which always get backed up) and any computer within the vicinity can access the music. The convenience of having all this music easily within reach, where I can easily switch from a portable player to my speaker setup, edit albums to my preference, make a variety of playlists, is just the greatest!



 
 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 8:21 AM   
 By:   ryankeaveney   (Member)

It boggles my mind that anyone would waste all the time to copy their music onto their computer only to use a lossy codec.

I only rip to Apple Lossless.

 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 8:40 AM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

I'm reminded of Harlan Ellison's old quote about taking grief for still writing on an Olympia Typewriter.

"I don't own a computer, or a modem, or anything like that; I still work on a manual typewriter, by choice, and to those who consider me a Luddite I say: Fuck you and yo mama. I operate at the level of technology that best suits my needs. And I type at 120 words per minute — two fingers — I make no mistakes, and my manuscripts are real. You can pick them up and hold them. My typewriter doesn't dump its memory — I don't lose a book."

Similarly, I don't lose a CD.

 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 8:50 AM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)


Every ten years I try listening to The Name of the Rose, which I think cost me $90 in 1989 from the thieves at Movie Boulevard (remember them? they would all but make up stuff and list it in their catalog). I still don't like it!

Lukas

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 8:54 AM   
 By:   captain_avis   (Member)

Every ten years I try listening to The Name of the Rose, which I think cost me $90 in 1989 from the thieves at Movie Boulevard (remember them? they would all but make up stuff and list it in their catalog). I still don't like it!

Lukas


I found the Name of the Rose for $1 in a used bin at a Thrift Shop amidst Backstreet Boys and Brittany Spears CDs. It wasn't even worth that!

Chris

 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 9:04 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

I'm reminded of Harlan Ellison's old quote about taking grief for still writing on an Olympia Typewriter.

"I don't own a computer, or a modem, or anything like that; I still work on a manual typewriter, by choice, and to those who consider me a Luddite I say: Fuck you and yo mama. I operate at the level of technology that best suits my needs. And I type at 120 words per minute — two fingers — I make no mistakes, and my manuscripts are real. You can pick them up and hold them. My typewriter doesn't dump its memory — I don't lose a book."


But I´m sure Ellison needs to copy and mail his manuscripts. I hope he feels very superior to others who can print out and e-mail their work within minutes - and get the assignments he can´t compete with. Even though he never makes a mistake.

 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 9:41 AM   
 By:   Anthony Marose   (Member)

I can respect the decision to keep with the times ... but Lukas, I'm rather shocked you'd settle for MP3s considering your history in this business and the quality you've always stood for both in design and sound. No offense. Any reason for MP3s over say a lossless codec?

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 9:52 AM   
 By:   CindyLover   (Member)

I've never seen Vertical Limit

I've seen it, and you and Lukas are two very, very lucky people.

 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 9:58 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

"I don't own a computer, or a modem, or anything like that; I still work on a manual typewriter, by choice, and to those who consider me a Luddite I say: Fuck you and yo mama. I operate at the level of technology that best suits my needs. And I type at 120 words per minute — two fingers — I make no mistakes, and my manuscripts are real. You can pick them up and hold them. My typewriter doesn't dump its memory — I don't lose a book."

I am amused that for so many the key point here is the equivalent of "I don't lose a book" when to me the operative phrase is "I operate at the level of technology that best suits my needs."

 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 10:06 AM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)

I can respect the decision to keep with the times ... but Lukas, I'm rather shocked you'd settle for MP3s considering your history in this business and the quality you've always stood for both in design and sound. No offense. Any reason for MP3s over say a lossless codec?

I started iTunes casually, not even realizing the settings, and I guess I'm too lazy to go back and re-load everything—I also have some space limitations on my internal hard drive. Listening on computer speakers most of the time I can't tell the difference and I figure I do have the CDs if I need to re-load at better quality. That's the lame answer!

Lukas

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 10:12 AM   
 By:   slint   (Member)

I am still shocked that Apple does not allow easy lossless options. You can't buy lossless music, you can't load your FLAC music libraries on Apple devices, unless you crack them with Rockbox, etc... Fortunately for me there more clever companies and devices (and not just that new Pono). This even led me to stop buying Apple products of any kind, since I'm afraid there are other such ridiculous restrictions.

I am bit less shocked that people do not use lossless since Apple *make* it difficult with lossless, which is a shame, since with cheap 3TB hard disks, I don't see many reasons to use MP3, other than conform with what some company tells me to do.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 10:26 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Listening on computer speakers most of the time I can't tell the difference. . . Lukas

Ah, that explains much. Except for making edits or quick reference checks, I would no more listen to music on computer speakers than I would choose to sleep in a dentist's chair. But of course Lukas does that kind of professional work, and I guess it makes sense for him.

As for me, I've had only one defective CD in thirty years, and I loathe iTunes and its obsession with selling you "songs" almost as much as I do the notion of downloading perfectly good disc content.

 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 10:29 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

The endless debate over mp3´s "lossy" quality astounds me.

An audiophile proved to me that you really need extremely sensitive hearing and complex hifi-equipment to truly recognize the loss of mp3 quality.

Also, anyone over the age of 40 will rarely still possess the ability to hear it.

So... I´m good ;-)

 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 10:31 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

Listening on computer speakers most of the time I can't tell the difference. . . Lukas

Ah, that explains much. Except for making edits or quick reference checks, I would no more listen to music on computer speakers than I would choose to sleep in a dentist's chair. But of course Lukas does that kind of professional work, and I guess it makes sense for him.

As for me, I've had only one defective CD in thirty years, and I loathe iTunes and its obsession with selling you "songs" almost as much as I do the notion of downloading perfectly good disc content.


Um, iTunes never tried to sell me anything. It offers a music catalogue like any record store, and I search for music I want to buy. Do you have another version?

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 10:51 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

Every ten years I try listening to The Name of the Rose, .... I still don't like it!

Lukas


Each to their own, of course, but I recall that this was the James Horner score which really made me take note. I loved Cocoon but was a little so-so with a number of his other scores until I got hold of a copy of Name of the Rose.

I found the best time to listen was on a Sunday morning whilst making porridge when the family were still in bed ... time it to end before they joined me for breakfast. smile

Mitch

 
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