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 Posted:   Mar 30, 2014 - 10:36 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)


And I'm not sure where I first heard Aram Khachaturian's lively "Sabre Dance." I'd like to say that it was in James Cagney's ONE, TWO, THREE. But it's more likely that it accompanied some plate-spinner on The Ed Sullivan Show.






There was a very popular (early 70s?) rock version of Sabre Dance by an outfit called Love Sculpture (with Dave Edmunds). Maybe that's where you became best acquainted with it, like I did.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2014 - 10:39 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

I probably first heard Barber's "Adagio for Strings" in PLATOON.

And most certainly my first hearing of Gounod's "Funeral March of a Marionette" was as the theme for Alfred Hitchcock Presents.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2014 - 10:50 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)


And I'm not sure where I first heard Aram Khachaturian's lively "Sabre Dance." I'd like to say that it was in James Cagney's ONE, TWO, THREE. But it's more likely that it accompanied some plate-spinner on The Ed Sullivan Show.


There was a very popular (early 70s?) rock version of Sabre Dance by an outfit called Love Sculpture (with Dave Edmunds). Maybe that's where you became best acquainted with it, like I did.



In listening to it now, I'm sure that I've never heard that version before.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2014 - 11:23 PM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)

'Death in Venice' introduced me to Mahler. I went to a concert with the L.A. Philharmonic for the first time as a youngster just to hear the 5th Symphony Adagio used in the film only to find the rest of the work just as enjoyable.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2014 - 3:59 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

...
stay where you are!


Okay, if you're going to rule my first Discovery out of bounds ...

I had seen 2001 ... at the cinema (and managed to stay awake ...) so the two classical pieces therein referred to above were early attractions for me.

In the late 70s I enjoyed a TV sitcom called Butterflies which constantly used a lovely piece of music in certain recurring scenes. Through the magazine collection mentioned above I found this piece to be Albinoni's Adagio in G minor ... it remains a favourite piece to this day (especially the near 12' recording by Karajan/BPO).

Back in those early days of record buying, almost every compilation or Themes' album featured a popular melody called The theme from Elvira Madigan or Elvira's Theme ... and this was identified as being the Andante from Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major. I never disliked this concerto but it's taken me many years to come to appreciate it - as with most of Mozart's works. I never did see the film Elvira Madigan smile

I already knew (well, I'd heard it a few times ...) Ravel's Boléro so I can't suggest Henry Mancini's use of it in 10 helped me discover it ... more than it made me buy a legitimate recording so that I could shake off any memory of its massacre in that score ... frown

Similarly, though not quite so intensely, Jerry Goldsmith's use of Massenet's Meditation [Thaïs] ... happily I already owned a true recording so could ignore the poor rendition in his score to Angie.

And: Rossini's Overture to Guillaume Tell (William Tell) was well-known to me (I recall seeing a TV series in the 1960s!) but I was very surprised to find that this famous melody is only the final part of the 11-12' overture.

And so many others ...

Am I forgiven?

Mitch

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2014 - 4:06 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

I can't be the only one who, after seeing 2001, bought the LP of Richard Strauss' Also Sprach Zarathustra, only to find that the great opening is the only thing good about it & the rest of it is quite boring.

 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2014 - 4:13 AM   
 By:   Maleficio   (Member)

I can't be the only one who, after seeing 2001, bought the LP of Richard Strauss' Also Sprach Zarathustra, only to find that the great opening is the only thing good about it & the rest of it is quite boring.

I think it's just you.

It's excellent tone poem:

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2014 - 4:25 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)



I think it's just you.

It's excellent tone poem:


Ha, I can assure you it's not just me, but to each his own, enjoy!

Oh on second thoughts I'm sure you're right, it was just me, I was the only one in the world that thought it was a disappointment after that amazing opening. And remembering (way) back, I didn't even buy it. I listened to it in a booth in the big HMV shop in London's Oxford Street. Those were the days (60's) when you could listen to the record, but after about 10 minutes I thought this is boring...& sneaked out when the bloke wasn't looking.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2014 - 4:40 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

I have always been into classical music right from a very early age but there has still been the odd "discovery" later in life. Arvo Part comes to mind, the use by James Newton Howard of his 'Fratres' in Snow Falling On Cedars was a revelation.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2014 - 5:03 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)



I think it's just you.

It's excellent tone poem:


Ha, I can assure you it's not just me, but to each his own, enjoy!

Oh on second thoughts I'm sure you're right, it was just me, I was the only one in the world that thought it was a disappointment after that amazing opening. And remembering (way) back, I didn't even buy it. I listened to it in a booth in the big HMV shop in London's Oxford Street. Those were the days (60's) when you could listen to the record, but after about 10 minutes I thought this is boring...& sneaked out when the guy wasn't looking.


I now have four recordings of this piece ... I love it! But what I find about most of these classical works is that you do need a few listens. Some grab you from the word go but others need further exposure. If you're not taken with this work do try his Tod und Verklärung (Death and Transfiguration), Op.24 ... it's wonderfully melodic.

Mitch

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2014 - 5:08 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)



I think it's just you.

It's excellent tone poem:


Ha, I can assure you it's not just me, but to each his own, enjoy!

Oh on second thoughts I'm sure you're right, it was just me, I was the only one in the world that thought it was a disappointment after that amazing opening. And remembering (way) back, I didn't even buy it. I listened to it in a booth in the big HMV shop in London's Oxford Street. Those were the days (60's) when you could listen to the record, but after about 10 minutes I thought this is boring...& sneaked out when the guy wasn't looking.


I now have four recordings of this piece ... I love it! But what I find about most of these classical works is that you do need a few listens. Some grab you from the word go but others need further exposure. If you're not taken with this work do try his Tod und Verklärung (Death and Transfiguration), Op.24 ... it's wonderfully melodic.

Mitch


Yeah, fair enough, some composers just don't do it for you, & I didn't get into full classical mode until the early 70's.

 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2014 - 5:18 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

It was through Stanley Kubrick's THE SHINING that I discovered the music of Krzysztof Penderecki, and I am grateful for that.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2014 - 8:18 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

... I kept thinking I must investigate but my few pennies were always absorbed on buying another film score or an album by one of those easy-listening artists I've loved all my wife ...


Now there's a Freudian slip you can admit to!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2014 - 8:29 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

Good topic, old horse.

. Rollerball introduced me to the music of D D Shostakovich.


Well, some good came out of that lousy film, i guess
wink



Awesome film! A sci fi classic. Along with the music.



Quite right, Brother Solium. A classic indeed. B R Marshall esq must be thinking about the execrable remake.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2014 - 8:48 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

... I kept thinking I must investigate but my few pennies were always absorbed on buying another film score or an album by one of those easy-listening artists I've loved all my wife ...


Now there's a Freudian slip you can admit to!


Yikes! ... you mean to say you actually read what I wrote? That's more than I did - obviously! smile

Hands up - I admit it.

Mitch

 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2014 - 2:40 PM   
 By:   Sean Nethery   (Member)

It was through Stanley Kubrick's THE SHINING that I discovered the music of Krzysztof Penderecki, and I am grateful for that.

Me too on Penderecki and also Bartok - I wasn't aware of the Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta until then - and it's been a favorite for 34 years!

 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2014 - 5:32 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

I was always a classical music fan even before I discovered film music at an early age, but I have discovered new unfamiliar pieces through film score. The best examples I can think of (besides 2001 leading me to ALSO SPRACH ZARATHUSTRA...a fabulous piece all the way through...certainly not boring), are THE ISLAND leading me to purchase EIN HELDENLEBEN (also by R. Strauss) and discovering the music of Leos Janacek in THE UNBEARABLE LIGHTNESS OF BEING (one of my top ten favorite films).

 
 Posted:   Apr 1, 2014 - 2:38 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

And how could I forget discovering my all-time favorite classical composer, Gustav Mahler, through DEATH IN VENICE and THE GAMBLER? I now have recordings of every Mahler work available and try to catch as many live performances as possible. It's almost hard to believe, but Mahler was not performed often and below a lot of people's radar prior to the 1950s and a real explosion in interest didn't happen until the 70s.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 2, 2014 - 6:54 AM   
 By:   Joe E.   (Member)

I think my first exposure to classical music came from Warner Bros. cartoons and Bugs Bunny:

Rabbit of Seville - Rossini's "The Barber of Seville"

What's Opera, Doc? - Richard Wagner's operas, particularly "Der Ring des Nibelungen", "Der Fliegende Hollander", and "Tannhäuser."

Baton Bunny - Von Suppe’s "A Morning, Noon and Night in Vienna"

A Corny Concerto - Johann Strauss' "Tales from the Vienna Woods" and "The Blue Danube"


I was just coming to this thread to post "surely I can't be the only one here whose first experiences with classical music came through Warner Bros. cartoons."

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 2, 2014 - 6:57 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

... I kept thinking I must investigate but my few pennies were always absorbed on buying another film score or an album by one of those easy-listening artists I've loved all my wife ...


Now there's a Freudian slip you can admit to!


Yikes! ... you mean to say you actually read what I wrote? That's more than I did - obviously! smile

Hands up - I admit it.

Mitch



You know I hang on your every word.

 
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