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 Posted:   Jan 4, 2011 - 5:24 PM   
 By:   Sean   (Member)

OHMSS.

cool

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2011 - 6:17 PM   
 By:   Bill Finn   (Member)

OHMSS.

cool


Certainly worth a nomination, at the very least. Perhaps the song as well.

 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2011 - 6:24 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)



Now we dearly doubt anyone would seriously contest the incontrovertible fact – where
lasting seminal influence is concerned – the Golden Gent would haveta be for the
musical Rosetta Stone enshrined in





As to that, our own personal choice



would absolutely be for the sublime tapestry of



Still, where totality of inspired accomplishment accrues, we’d haveta offer
this as the overall consummate choice:







And yours? smile wink big grin



Those are my three favorites.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2011 - 6:26 PM   
 By:   cps   (Member)


Goldfinger and O.H.M.S.S. are both highly competent and artistically important scores, so I'd pick one if not both of them.

I can't think of better scores from the respective years of 1964 and 1969.

Dan


1964 "A Fistful of Dollars” for me Dan.

For me anyway the music in Fistful of Dollars was more powerful, dramatic and had a bigger impact in my cinema history than Goldfinger.

Don’t get my wrong Goldfinger is a great score and works brilliantly in the film, but Fistful of Dollars for me is in a different league.

A perfect combination of music & film intertwined with each other leading to a work of art that changed western scores for all time.

One of the greatest director composer relationships in film history, I think they also surpassed themselves with For A Few Dollars More & The Good, The Bad And The Ugly.

Just looked it up, the Best Original Score for 1964 was Mary Poppins, I just can’t believe that!!!!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/37th_Academy_Awards


MY OSCAR GOES TO "A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS"


 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2011 - 6:34 PM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

My answers are here:

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=16180&forumID=1&archive=1

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2011 - 6:59 PM   
 By:   cps   (Member)

My answers are here:

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=16180&forumID=1&archive=1


Great post ZapBrannigan,

* BEST EXPANSION / MOST IMPROVED SCORE
Diamonds Are Forever keeps coming up time & time again for this one.

The original release was great but the expanded score just put into a different level for me. I personally feel its getting very close to being on par with On Her Majesty's Secret Service for best score...

 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2011 - 7:47 PM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

Great post ZapBrannigan,

* BEST EXPANSION / MOST IMPROVED SCORE
Diamonds Are Forever keeps coming up time & time again for this one.

The original release was great but the expanded score just put into a different level for me. I personally feel its getting very close to being on par with On Her Majesty's Secret Service for best score...


Thanks, cps. I like DAF a lot but there is some danger of the Moon Buggy theme getting stuck in my head, so sometimes I skip that track. And maybe "Circus Circus." But the title song and fight music are second to none.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2011 - 8:45 PM   
 By:   jkannry   (Member)

On Her Majesty's Secret Service with Goldfinger very close second

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 5, 2011 - 1:57 AM   
 By:   JADSTERSDAD   (Member)

I would honestly say Thunderball.

 
 Posted:   Jan 5, 2011 - 2:54 AM   
 By:   Lokutus   (Member)

none smile

 
 Posted:   Jan 5, 2011 - 3:19 AM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

none smile

I'll second.
BTW I think that YOLT has one of the most peculiar film posters:


How on Heaven could Bond find the time to get himself comfortable in his typical posture during a ferocious battle in the skyes????

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 5, 2011 - 6:44 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

none smile

Never O'say Never Egain.

Bad choice pal.

 
 Posted:   Jan 5, 2011 - 11:56 AM   
 By:   Urs Lesse   (Member)

If it was about which Barry Bond score was artistically best, I would tend towards YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE.
Hell, the YOLT guitar alone deserves an Oscar in my book!

I second that. And besides, "You Only Live Twice" is my all-time-favourite song. Ever. Pop and all other music included.

But also DIAMONDS and OHMSS are musically nearly on par with YOLT.


I did not explicitly add that OHMSS is still my favourite Bond soundtrack of them all. Today I thought about how to characterize the difference between the YOLT and OHMSS scores, and the comparison that I ended up at was this:
YOLT is more like a grand Hieronymus Bosch painting with all its hundreds of amazing details, and incredibly bandwidth of colour tones and full of big drama, sometimes bordering the surreal world, while OHMSS is more like an expressionist Van Gogh painting, dealing with down to earth sceneries, usually simplified, but yet incredibly rich, bold and powerful in its moods and unsurpassable in intensity.

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 3:39 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I've never understood why Bond fans have such an obsession with OHMSS. Lazenby??? Long, drawn out, and poorly overdubbed kilt-wearing big-eared amateur as Bond...a romance that is like cold fish on screen, the camera cranking that THUNDERBALL haters always point out, Diana Rigg's worst performance, and then Barry's score...annoying synth "stingers", endless repetition--Lukas himself mentioned bars removed for the expanded release--and that wretched Christmas song. I just don't see (hear) what's so great about that score or that movie. I abhor the "underrated/overrated" term, but OHMSS is definitely OVERrated.

Love "We Have All the Time in the World", though. big grin

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 3:59 AM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

This is so weird- DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER is a jokey, goofy movie, but the score was fantastic!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 5:07 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

I've never understood why Bond fans have such an obsession with OHMSS. Lazenby??? Long, drawn out, and poorly overdubbed kilt-wearing big-eared amateur as Bond...a romance that is like cold fish on screen, the camera cranking that THUNDERBALL haters always point out, Diana Rigg's worst performance, and then Barry's score...annoying synth "stingers", endless repetition--Lukas himself mentioned bars removed for the expanded release--and that wretched Christmas song. I just don't see (hear) what's so great about that score or that movie. I abhor the "underrated/overrated" term, but OHMSS is definitely OVERrated.

Love "We Have All the Time in the World", though. big grin


If you have to include the size of an actor's ears in a critique of the film, I think you're on shaky ground from the start!

For every (spurious) criticism, there's a perfectly fair counter-argument... starting with Lazenby. As a cypher (as intended by Fleming in the books) I think he does a marvellous job, being a blank canvas for Peter Hunt without all the idiosyncracies that Connery had developed in the character, and which Moore took to a ridiculous degree. There's no doubting Lazenby's athleticism in the role and my main regret about the Bond series is that he didn't go on to do DAF. It would have been a less jokey film if he had.

The romance was beautifully drawn out - OK, maybe a bit rushed, but all the elements were there; the tension at the start, the perfectly-scored montage, Bond's reliance on Tracey for deliverance and the tragic end. For my money, any problems between Lazenby and Rigg failed to make it onto celluloid.

Critics of Thunderball may despise the camera cranking - and Jim you didn't mention the back-projection which is more of a distraction - but come on, these are 1960s films and stand up perfectly well in that context. All films are little time capsules and add to the richness of being a film fan. If you can't accept this, then you might as well burn every black and white movie ever made!

And I've left the best until last - the sublime score. I'm not going to go on at length about it. it's well-enough known not to havbe to do that, and people who don't like it won't change their minds anyway. But how can you not love the propulsion of the main theme and the ski-chase cues, the tension in the Gumbold office scene, the majesty of the flight to Piz Gloria? For me, these are all as startlingly obvious as the Louis Armstrong song. And the architypal Bond music moment: when the sorrow of the final scene, played against a heart-breaking version of WHATTITW, is replaced by the James Bond Theme, signifying that he'll return, harder and more embittered, but more than ever determined to fight for Queen and country.

Unfortunately, of course, Lazenby doesn't, only to be replaced by a pink-tied Connery who managed to look older than he did in NSNA (IMO).

Over-rated? Only if you take it out of the Bond canon and measure it against The Godfather! As part of the greatest film series ever, it fits the bill perfectly, and in many respects stands head and shoulders over most of the others.

And don't criticise Lazenby so loudly, Jim - with those lugs he'll probably hear you!

TG

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 5:21 AM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

I've never understood why Bond fans have such an obsession with OHMSS. Lazenby??? Long, drawn out, and poorly overdubbed kilt-wearing big-eared amateur as Bond...a romance that is like cold fish on screen, the camera cranking that THUNDERBALL haters always point out, Diana Rigg's worst performance, and then Barry's score...annoying synth "stingers", endless repetition--Lukas himself mentioned bars removed for the expanded release--and that wretched Christmas song. I just don't see (hear) what's so great about that score or that movie. I abhor the "underrated/overrated" term, but OHMSS is definitely OVERrated.

Love "We Have All the Time in the World", though. big grin


If you have to include the size of an actor's ears in a critique of the film, I think you're on shaky ground from the start!

For every (spurious) criticism, there's a perfectly fair counter-argument... starting with Lazenby. As a cypher (as intended by Fleming in the books) I think he does a marvellous job, being a blank canvas for Peter Hunt without all the idiosyncracies that Connery had developed in the character, and which Moore took to a ridiculous degree. There's no doubting Lazenby's athleticism in the role and my main regret about the Bond series is that he didn't go on to do DAF. It would have been a less jokey film if he had.

The romance was beautifully drawn out - OK, maybe a bit rushed, but all the elements were there; the tension at the start, the perfectly-scored montage, Bond's reliance on Tracey for deliverance and the tragic end. For my money, any problems between Lazenby and Rigg failed to make it onto celluloid.

Critics of Thunderball may despise the camera cranking - and Jim you didn't mention the back-projection which is more of a distraction - but come on, these are 1960s films and stand up perfectly well in that context. All films are little time capsules and add to the richness of being a film fan. If you can't accept this, then you might as well burn every black and white movie ever made!

And I've left the best until last - the sublime score. I'm not going to go on at length about it. it's well-enough known not to havbe to do that, and people who don't like it won't change their minds anyway. But how can you not love the propulsion of the main theme and the ski-chase cues, the tension in the Gumbold office scene, the majesty of the flight to Piz Gloria? For me, these are all as startlingly obvious as the Louis Armstrong song. And the architypal Bond music moment: when the sorrow of the final scene, played against a heart-breaking version of WHATTITW, is replaced by the James Bond Theme, signifying that he'll return, harder and more embittered, but more than ever determined to fight for Queen and country.

Unfortunately, of course, Lazenby doesn't, only to be replaced by a pink-tied Connery who managed to look older than he did in NSNA (IMO).

Over-rated? Only if you take it out of the Bond canon and measure it against The Godfather! As part of the greatest film series ever, it fits the bill perfectly, and in many respects stands head and shoulders over most of the others.

And don't criticise Lazenby so loudly, Jim - with those lugs he'll probably hear you!

TG


Well put. OHMSS is a fine movie as is. It's actually one of the best in the true spirit of Fleming and the early film series.

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 6:04 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I think he does a marvellous job, being a blank canvas for Peter Hunt without all the idiosyncracies that Connery had developed in the character, and which Moore took to a ridiculous degree. There's no doubting Lazenby's athleticism in the role and my main regret about the Bond series is that he didn't go on to do DAF. It would have been a less jokey film if he had.

Oh, Lazenby's definitely a "blank canvas." big grin

What athleticism? The fight on the beach was edited to within an inch of its life! It's no surprise that an editor had to direct this film to keep the audience fooled as to the HUGE liability that was Lazenby. His voice is dubbed in a scene that should've showcased the "new guy", but they had no confidence in Lazenby to get that done. The fights are sped up or cut to ribbons, a "big name" actress is added to further obscure Lazenby's presence as Bond and we get a more charismatic villain than previously seen in any Bond film; it all adds up to covering up a very large casting error--Lazenby again.

I'm afraid the answer to "Who replaced Sean Connery as James Bond?" will have to remain "No one." (Partial credit if you guessed Roger Moore). wink


The romance was beautifully drawn out - OK, maybe a bit rushed, but all the elements were there; the tension at the start, the perfectly-scored montage, Bond's reliance on Tracey for deliverance and the tragic end. For my money, any problems between Lazenby and Rigg failed to make it onto celluloid.


Tragic? Rigg doesn't seem very tormented or pain-ravaged to me. She registers zero emotion here.


Critics of Thunderball may despise the camera cranking - and Jim you didn't mention the back-projection which is more of a distraction - but come on, these are 1960s films and stand up perfectly well in that context. All films are little time capsules and add to the richness of being a film fan. If you can't accept this, then you might as well burn every black and white movie ever made!


I'm merely pointing out that the standard criticisms of those '60s Bond films are conveniently forgotten when it comes to OHMSS.

I adore black and white movies--try contributing to some of my 1930s topics sometime. wink


And I've left the best until last - the sublime score. I'm not going to go on at length about it. it's well-enough known not to havbe to do that, and people who don't like it won't change their minds anyway. But how can you not love the propulsion of the main theme and the ski-chase cues, the tension in the Gumbold office scene, the majesty of the flight to Piz Gloria? For me, these are all as startlingly obvious as the Louis Armstrong song. And the architypal Bond music moment: when the sorrow of the final scene, played against a heart-breaking version of WHATTITW, is replaced by the James Bond Theme, signifying that he'll return, harder and more embittered, but more than ever determined to fight for Queen and country.


It was all done much more effectively in Barry's previous efforts. Goldfinger, Thunderball, and You Only Live Twice are all superior to Barry's work in OHMSS.

Whatever pathos-filled moment that may have existed in the final scene is ruined by the blaring inclusion of the Bond theme--who wrote that, anyway? big grin It was IMO highly innapropriate and shatters what could've been an effective downbeat ending.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 6:34 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

Sorry, Jim, I think we'll have to agree to disagree ... I'm taking centre-stage in the other camp re: OHMSS. I've just finished reading The Making of On Her Majesty's Secret Service by Charles Helfenstein, the blurb on the back of which reads:

A director who had never directed. A star that had never acted. 5 years of script development. A Swiss winter without snow. A haemorrhaging schedule. A hostile press.

How did these elements combine to create the greatest James Bond film ever made?


The film has its faults - as do all of the JB007 films and all films in general. For me, and for many others, the sum of the good parts far outweighs the sum of the bad parts. Mr. Barry's music is simply superb - as a quote from David Arnold (p198) attests:

Iconic brilliance and a bar set so high that every Bond score thereafter struggles to match its originality, elegance and power.

IMHO, George Lazenby played the role well (enough) and indeed the film benefitted from his inexperience - whilst Mr. Connery in Thunderball is the best single portrayal to date, I hate to think of him portraying JB007 in this film in the style of You Only Live Twice.

Yes, they surrounded Mr. Lazenby with stars - what would you expect ... a multi-million pound/dollar film with no star names? Miss Rigg is simply sensational - 100% perfect casting (they attempted to get Catherine Deneuve and Bridget Bardot ... I'm so glad they failed) and whilst Telly Savalas is a little OTT for my taste I'm happy to go for the ride.

But to return to Neo's question ... and I've been avoiding making a decision: I do think Goldfinger should have taken the Oscar as it was so in-tune. I prefer other JB007 scores but that 1964 score set the standard.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 6:36 AM   
 By:   cps   (Member)


Over-rated? Only if you take it out of the Bond canon and measure it against The Godfather! As part of the greatest film series ever, it fits the bill perfectly, and in many respects stands head and shoulders over most of the others. TG

By:Tall Guy (Member)


Well said Tall Guy but i am not sure "The Godfather" is anyway near HMSS in my view, can't think of a single track that could compete with Gumbold's Safe or Journey to Blofeld's Hideaway as a piece of composition. Well said thou.

Some good points by Jim but i cant agree that Goldfinger, Thunderball, and You Only Live Twice are all superior to Barry's work in OHMSS. In fact i would say it was the opposite but it's all about opinions.

i will leave the last words to Urs Lesse (Handstand) who stated brilliantly "HMSS is incredibly rich, bold and powerful in its moods and unsurpassable in intensity".

 
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