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 Posted:   Jun 27, 2012 - 10:17 AM   
 By:   Other Tallguy   (Member)

There are a lot of scores that I was very excited to have (Batman, The Rocketeer, the Return of the Jedi LP, the new Star Trek CDs over the last couple of years) but the one that blew my mind, rocked my world, and left me litterally a little dizzy and short of breath was the Star Wars Anthology box set in 1993.

This was before (for me) the internet. I had no idea it was coming. I had no idea such a thing could even exist. And suddenly there were four CDs of Star Wars music in my hands. All of my old Empire Strikes Back music that was missing from the previous CD, extra Star Wars, and *GASP* the last battle between Luke and Vader. The packaging and the liner notes were exquisite. This was a feast of music and content.

I was excited when the 1997 more-or-less-complete CDs came out, sure. I pestered my Best Buy staff into the ground. ("Well, go in the back and see if it came in today! It was supposed to be out this morning! YES I'm sure!") But even then it was nothing like that winter day in 1993. A friend of mine pointed out that I could talk about these CDs for longer than it took me to listen to them. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 27, 2012 - 11:22 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)


Strange, but every single one of my best memories of buying soundtracks (The Big Gundown at Newcastle Airport, Rene la Canne and 122 Rue de Provence from FNAC in Lyons, My Name is Nobody from some shop in Amsterdam, From Russia With Love, Goldfinger and Battle of Britain from a little branch of Callers in Ponteland and waiting for ages and ages and ages for Thunderball, Doctor No and I Film Della Violenza by mail order) involve LPs rather than CDs.

That must say something. Apart from the fact that I'm an old git, that is.

 
 Posted:   Jun 28, 2012 - 12:33 AM   
 By:   Superman1701   (Member)

Mine was Killer Klowns From Outer Space from Percepto Records....after that it was Varese's Karate Kid boxset and FSM's Superman Blue Box....I was super excited for each of these. But going back further...I think getting the score to Empire of the Sun, Men In Black, Independence Day, Superman The Movie (the original album) and others rank in the top of my memory.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 28, 2012 - 2:36 PM   
 By:   JEC   (Member)

Absolutely thrilled to find THE BIG CIRCUS in stereo, when I collected vinyl back in the 70s. Hated to part with it.

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2014 - 1:43 PM   
 By:   General Kael   (Member)

My favorite memory was finding one last copy of the expanded Krull on SAE for $50+ and frantically typing in my information to purchase it before anybody else could. Then I realized later that I had purchased the Super Tracks version instead of the La-La Land copy which has the Krull "Theme" that I was originally trying to get. So of course then I had to shell out $70+ for the La-La land Version on Amazon. I don't know why that's my favorite memory, but it is. And come to think of it, I enjoy having both copies; for no good reason whatsoever; it's sheer redundancy now that I have the La-La Land.

Although... my "all-time" favorite soundtrack purchase memory hasn't actually happened yet. Still waiting on an expanded and remastered soundtrack to a movie about Nellwyns to be released!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2014 - 2:01 PM   
 By:   dpsternan   (Member)

Two years ago, digging through the crazy-disorganized soundtrack CD section at my local shop - I found Goldsmith's "Psycho II," still sealed in the long cardboard Varese box smile

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2014 - 2:04 PM   
 By:   General Kael   (Member)

Wow, just like this guy wink

Four months ago, scouring through the soundtrack section of my local record store. Two hours later, about to leave, and buried underneath a pile of stuff, I found a sealed Goldsmith "Psycho II" on CD! I love those original, old-school, long cardboard box CD packaging.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2014 - 2:28 PM   
 By:   Jim Doherty   (Member)

Sorry, can't name just one. Three that stand out are:

1.) Probably the first soundtrack album I ever had. I think I was still in grade school... I called a downtown Chicago record store to see if there was a soundtrack for KING OF KINGS. At the time, it had just been reissued in England, and the store had it. My father worked near the store and went and picked it up for me. Thanks Dad!

2.) Around 1977-78, I bought a copy of the RCA LP of one of my favorite scores, NIGHT OF THE HUNTER, from A-1 Record Finders for $100.00. That was BIG bucks back then! I think I still have that receipt here somewhere.

3.) Shortly after the film A.I. came out, I found the Academy Award "For Your Consideration" 2-CD promo in a used record store for something like $4.99.

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2014 - 2:39 PM   
 By:   Brandon Brown   (Member)

I found THUNDERBALL on vinyl last year at a second-hand shop. I think it was $1.99, perfect condition.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2014 - 3:06 PM   
 By:   captain_avis   (Member)

A few memories:

1) Getting Star Trek: The Astral Symphony on Cassette for XMas one year. That was the album that started it all for me.

2) Trying to track down the Rocketeer and managing to find it from Intrada in the very early days of internet soundtrack sales (or at least for my awareness of that side of the business). Intrada used to send flyers out with a list of their catalogue and I remember just being gobsmacked by how many titles I never knew existed. I must have been maybe 12 at the time and I vividly remember going through and circling lists of titles just based on how cool the movie titles sounded. It would be years before I picked most of them up.

3) Making a big leap and going from franchise scores that I knew and loved to scores I'd never heard of. I think the album that did this for me was Goldsmith's Poltergeist on the Rhino re-release. It was a revelation to realize that this Goldsmith guy did awesome stuff other than Trek scores and that I could really enjoy albums without ever having seen their associated films.

Most of these memories are long gone. They come up less frequently in the digital age when everything is available at your fingertips and it seems if the score hasn't been released it'll be coming soon. Occasionally, I try a score I've never heard of by a composer I'm totally unfamiliar with and there's the thrill of finding something you really love and the possbility that there's more great work by this person out there...

4) ... the last time this happened was with Intrada's Clash of the Titans which exposed me to Rosenthal who I was completely unfamiliar with. It's still one of my favorite Intrada albums.

and finally

5) The day Lukas announced Star Trek II. This brought everything full circle and started the Trek Soundtrack renaissance. Of all the re-releases we've had theses scores are dearest to my heart and were my holiest grails. I'll never be able to thank everyone involved with these enough.

Great thread!

Chris

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2014 - 3:13 PM   
 By:   Peter Atterberg   (Member)

My best moment starts a little closer to now because I was born in 1990 and didn't start buying soundtracks till 2005.

I will say, long before that, I remember watching Moonraker as a seven year old and that free fall music, that version of the James Bond theme had me mesmerized...I kept humming it, every time I played cops and robbers, I sang it. I watch certain parts of Bond movies just to listen to the scores.

So, time went on, and I'd download various versions of the Bond theme, and parts of the scores, and then one day in 2005 while browsing a Barnes N' Nobles...I saw a galore of James Bond soundtracks. Thunderball, A View to a Kill, Octopussy, Dr. No, From Russia With Love, The Spy Who Loved Me, you name it they had it. At the time I hadn't realized they were all actually Lukas Kendall's remasters, (I didn't even know who he was yet) and I jumped for joy, but I didn't have the means to buy all of them at once.

So each week I saved up all of my lunch money, never spending a dime on food, and by weeks end, I'd have enough for a Bond soundtrack, and I'd drive to Barnes N' Noble and buy one or two Bond soundtracks, depending on how much cash I had...And after a few months, I had every single Lukas Kendall Remaster. I even managed to pick up Die Another Day, Tomorrow Never Dies, and The World is Not Enough.

That is how I started my way into soundtrack collecting.

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2014 - 3:22 PM   
 By:   bdm   (Member)

I have fond memories of finding the vinyl release (yes, I go that far back) of scores in the high school days, specifically THE GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY by Goldsmith, and BATTLESTAR GALACTICA by Phillips.

In the cd era, the big release was the STAR WARS box set; I saw the add in some magazine and went into a small, independent record store (now defunct thanks to the internet), as they would special order items for me, and sell them at a marginal mark up. The anticipation of more music from the saga, especially an almost complete JEDI, was draining. The day I got the call that the set had come in saw me book off all other responsibilities and head down immediately. The first cue I played was "Final Duel" - glorious! Played that box set non-stop. Made a cassette copy for a friend of mine in Toronto, and we actually got a ticket from the cops as he blasted the music on the street corner (we were so engrossed that we missed the officer flash his lights in an effort to get us to move [a no stopping zone at that time apparently]).

The next event was the STAR TREK TOS box set - spent the extra cash to have express delivery, and when that package arrived I curled up in the basement and played away....

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2014 - 3:54 PM   
 By:   dpsternan   (Member)

Wow, just like this guy wink

Four months ago, scouring through the soundtrack section of my local record store. Two hours later, about to leave, and buried underneath a pile of stuff, I found a sealed Goldsmith "Psycho II" on CD! I love those original, old-school, long cardboard box CD packaging.


Nice!

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2014 - 3:56 PM   
 By:   Trent B.   (Member)

I would have to wager seeing the 20th Anniversary set for Star Trek The Motion Picture at Borders (when it was still around) when I still lived in Las Vegas. I was just there one day to check out some CDs and I saw it. I got all gitty and I was all, "Oh no way!" and was able to convince my parents to buy it for me since at the time I had no money.

Another time was when I saw the "Ultimate Edition" for The Phantom Menace at Borders and reacted the same way as I did with the 20th Anniversary for Star Trek TMP. Of course at the time I loved that CD to death because I didn't care it was basically an isolated score.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 26, 2014 - 10:07 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Going to a flea market and paying a dollar for a pristine original copy of "The Tenth Victim" on the Mainstream label.

Edit: I already wrote this! At least I am consistent!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 26, 2014 - 10:34 AM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Going to a house sale where I found loads of LP soundtracks and this old man had no knowledge of the value of them, he had them in a $1,00 box, [some of them were-55 days to Peking, the Vikings, Marco the magnificent, Nine days to Rama,Mondo cane no 2, Africa addio, etc etc, 60's type.I am a nice guy, I told him I will take them all, but not at $1.00, he looked at me thinking I wanted them even cheaper, I pull out a couple hundred dollar bills and told them these are worth something. He felt good, I felt good. That's how to do business and it reminded me of an episode of Pawn stars where the guys did the same thing, giving the customer more because he knew it was worth more then the naïve customer thought. Fair is fair.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 12:38 AM   
 By:   Tobias   (Member)

Going to a house sale where I found loads of LP soundtracks and this old man had no knowledge of the value of them, he had them in a $1,00 box, [some of theme were-55 days to Peking, the Vikings, Marco the magnificent, Nine days to Rama,Mondo cane no 2, Africa addio, etc etc, 60's type.I am a nice guy, I told him I will take them all, but not at $1.00, he looked at me thinking I wanted them even cheaper, I pull out a couple hundred dollar bills and told them these are worth something. He felt good, I felt good. That's how to do business and it reminded me of an episode of Pawn stars where the guys did the same thing, giving the customer more because he knew it was worth more then the naïve customer thought. Fair is fair.


This reminds me of those times I bought LP soundtracks at a second hand CD store and several of those where soundtracks that either was not yet released on CD or released on limited edition CD`s and already sold out. So because of that I decided to buy them. The thing is a few weeks after those purchases I find out that this or that label is releasing/re-releasing them on CD.

When I bought them I felt that I did some good purchases but when finding out later on that they getting a CD release/re-release made me go bananas. Last time it happened was last year when I bought Kamen`s Suspect (knowing that the CD was pretty expansive) and just a few weeks after that Varese did their CD Club release that included Suspect.

So up until those CD releases/re-releases I thought that it was some of my best purchases.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 12:56 AM   
 By:   Ford A. Thaxton   (Member)

For me...


Getting the LP of the FANTASY WORLDS OF BERNARD HERRMANN back in the 70's

Picking up SPACE:1999 by pure chance in 1975

and getting LOGAN'S RUN at the same time...

That rocked my world.


Ford A. Thaxton

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 1:27 AM   
 By:   governor   (Member)

My first soundtrack

the LP of Moonraker.

and a few years later getting LPs of Young Sherlock Holmes and SUPERMAN THE MOVIE

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 1:50 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

It starts for me in the mid 60s, when I was around six or seven years old, with my first collection of around ten singles given to me by my uncle for my new Chad Valley Close and Play record player. Along with Adam Faith's Poor Me, and twangy guitar band The Moontrekkers' Night of the Vampire, was The 'Ooter Song (!) by Carry On films star Sidney James. More significantly though were the first commercial release of the original Delia Derbyshire/BBC Radiophonic Workshop recording of the Doctor Who theme on the Decca label, and the theme from the tv series Out of this World, by Tony Hatch.

1973 was my earliest soundtrack purchasing year in earnest. I got my dada to buy me Rosza's Golden Voyage of Sinbad, whilst on a day trip to Blackpool. Then the tv soundtrack album for Kung Fu, and the 70s release of that same Doctor Who theme in stereo and now on the BBC Records label in the same shop in Rotherham on a Saturdy afternoon.

Not long after they re-released the 7th Voyage to cash in on the success of the Golden Voyage, and with it came Herrmann's soundtrack with it's best ever cover. At the same time I too got into those Phase 4 recordings starting with The Fantasy Film World of Bernard Herrmann. I ordered 7th Voyage at Can the Music Man record store in Sheffield as it was so newly released they hadn't got it in stock. In the same store I noticed the Phase 4s and the Charles Gerhardt RCA albums. And the rest, as they say, is history.

The final part of these beginnings, still within the 70s is when I saw what became my first mail order purchases in British monthly film magazine Photoplay, Morricone's Five Man Army and Once Upon A Time in the West from Soundtrack and General.

Fond memories all.

 
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