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 Posted:   Jan 8, 2013 - 7:47 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Like many here, I found KHARTOUM to be highly effective in the theater on first viewing. The album, however, displayed such a heavy debt to North and Walton that I've never been able to enjoy it. At least the CLEOPATRA connection made sense in the earlier film. But this time we're a long way from Egypt, and I cannot imagine that the producers were again demanding that particular style from their composer. So I don't know. Is CROMWELL really different?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2013 - 7:53 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

I'll be having one of these!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2013 - 10:43 AM   
 By:   Clark Wayne   (Member)

This film turns up regularly on Sunday afternoon TV and the main title immediately caught my ear. Been wanting this for a couple of years.

Very pleased to have this, and Congo. With Dave and The Relic, as well, my year has started on a fantastic note!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2013 - 10:43 AM   
 By:   Clark Wayne   (Member)

This film turns up regularly on Sunday afternoon TV and the main title immediately caught my ear. Been wanting this for a couple of years.

Very pleased to have this, and Congo. With Dave and The Relic, as well, my year has started on a fantastic note!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2013 - 12:58 PM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

A complete soundtrack from a 1970 Columbia film! An amazing find, on par with One-Eyed Jacks & 55 Days At Peking. Thank god for mis-labeling. As much as I love yer big Hollywood epic music, it's nice to have something a bit different. I wonder if Raymond Leppard's, Alfred The Great will ever get a legit release (FSM250?smile)

Will any other lost soundtracks surface this year?

 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2013 - 2:25 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Like many here, I found KHARTOUM to be highly effective in the theater on first viewing. The album, however, displayed such a heavy debt to North and Walton that I've never been able to enjoy it. At least the CLEOPATRA connection made sense in the earlier film. But this time we're a long way from Egypt, and I cannot imagine that the producers were again demanding that particular style from their composer. So I don't know. Is CROMWELL really different?





What has Cleo to do with this film?????? Is that all North ever composed?


'Khartoum' has a reference to Cleo in one scene, and a reference to Holst's oriental stuff in the Overture, but not overall. As I said, when several composers move their chords slightly to break the same set of rules in a fashion, at the same time, they might seem derivative, but they may not be. And if LK is right, then it wasn't Cordell's fault, but a temp-track directive. Cordell was far too talented to copy North in that cue without some prompting.


In 'Cromwell' there's a hint of the 'Spartacus' battle music during the battle scenes, but that's to do with the modernity Cordell was invoking, a modernity one of whose cliches was to use major/minor clashes, and in brass that'll always sound a certain way, no matter who chooses to do it. The music has nothing to do with Cleopatra!

I'm not sure that Walton is at all overly present in 'Khartoum'. Many, many UK documentary films and TV shows then had a certain cliched style of post-Victorianism that some people think of as Elgarian, but it was a generic style, not exclusive to Walton.


Maybe it's worth noting that Cordell's wife Magda was a famous pop-art collagist, and he too participated in this 'experiment' as he called it.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2013 - 9:52 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

Does anyone else feel like they're listening to an oratorio?

 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2013 - 10:55 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

CROMWELL has been on DVD for over 9 years by now, and some folks who have watched this film should already be aware of how Frank Cordell's music sounds without sampling Intrada's clips.

As Varese Sarabande had done with their CD for A GATHERING OF EAGLES, Intrada has chosen (basically) the 'action' music for the soundclips. This rather lopsided presentation of Cordell's score attempts to sell the 'battle' aspect of CROMWELL while forsaking Cordell's frequent and quite contemporary-sounding musical stings during & between scenes of play-like dialogue.

Those people relying solely upon Intrada's sound clips to make purchasing decisions should also be aware that tracks such as "Aye - A Beggar", "Be On Your Guard", & "The Hanging" (to cite a few from memory) won't sound like "Golden Age" Hollywood epics.
And the choral portions of the score might sit better with those listeners already acclimated towards classical vocal music.

Another interesting thing about this Intrada release is that it is on Intrada and not on Kritzerland.
During 2011, Kritzerland was releasing CD after CD from both the Capitol & Liberty records' album master tapes vaulted at Capitol/EMI.
Indeed, I anticipated the Capitol LP program of CROMWELL to be re-issued onto CD by Kritzerland (especially after titles like KINGS GO FORTH and GENGHIS KHAN showed up).

Will future releases of any Capitol or Liberty LP program be forthcoming from Intrada ... or Kritzerland ... or both?

[other 1970 Capitol LPs include Lai's RIDER ON THE RAIN and Morricone's BIRD WITH THE CRYSTAL PLUMAGE (hint ... hint...)]

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 9, 2013 - 2:10 AM   
 By:   Dorian   (Member)

[other 1970 Capitol LPs include Lai's RIDER ON THE RAIN and Morricone's BIRD WITH THE CRYSTAL PLUMAGE (hint ... hint...)]

Both have already been released on CD in Europe, the Morricone score even expanded.

 
 Posted:   Jan 9, 2013 - 3:33 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Hi, Dorian

Yes, I noticed those, but haven't gotten either CD of them.
I'm curious to know if the Capitol/EMI vaults here in U.S. might have the entire recording sessions on both RIDER & BIRD, or would they only have the LP album master tapes.

(Another Capitol LP is Dominic Frontiere's '72 HAMMERSMITH IS OUT...)

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 9, 2013 - 3:51 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Here are the Capitol LPs that have gotten a CD release in the past decade:

With a Song in My Heart (various popular) {Released by DRG, August 2003}
St. Louis Blues (Nelson Riddle) {Released by Collector’s Choice, November 2007}
Hey Boy! Hey Girl! (Nelson Riddle) {Released by DRG, 2009}
Saint Joan (Mischa Spoliansky) {Released by Kritzerland, August 2010}
Hawaii Five-O (Morton Stevens) {Released by FSM, September 2010}
I Spy (Earle Hagen) {Released by FSM, February 2011}
Hell’s Angels ’69 (Tony Bruno) {Released by Reel Time, March 2012}
Cromwell (dialogue, Frank Cordell) [Released by Intrada, January 2013}

And the ones still awaiting their first CD release:

Bad Boys (Bill Conti)
Beach Blanket Bingo (various pop)
Beyond the Great Wall (source music)
Cat Ballou (Nat King Cole, other film themes)
The Continental Twist (various pop)
A Face in the Crowd (Tom Glazer)
Gigot (Michel Magne, Jackie Gleason)
The Golden Breed, (Mike Curb, Jerry Styner)
Hammersmith Is Out (Dominic Frontiere)
The Harrad Experiment (Artie Butler)
The Harrad Summer (Patrick Williams)
Heart Beat (Jack Nitzsche)
His Wife’s Habit (Jim Helms)
The Hitter (Garfeel Ruff)
Honky Tonk Freeway (Elmer Bernstein, George Martin)
Hotel New Hampshire (Jacques Offenbach)
John F. Kennedy: Years of Lightning, Day of Drums (Bruce Herschenson, dialogue)
Love, American Style (Charles Fox)
Marvin and Tige (Patrick Williams)
The Mating Urge (Stanley Wilson)
My Side of the Mountain (Wilfred Josephs)
Norwood (Al DeLory, various pop)
Outlaw Blues (Charles Bernstein, various country)
Privilege (Mike Leander, Mark London)
The Sacred Idol (Les Baxter)
Sing Boy Sing (Lionel Newman, Tommy Sands)
The Untouchables [TV] (Nelson Riddle)
Up the Academy (various rock)
War and Peace [1968] (Vyacheslav Ovchinnikov)
What Comes Around (Jerry Reed, other country)
Woman Times Seven (Riz Ortolani)

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 9, 2013 - 4:26 AM   
 By:   chriscoyle   (Member)

Cromwell will be on TCM January 16th at 5:30pm (ET) for those who are interested. I would also like to hear more samples of the score. The story about a drunk Richard Harris is hilarious.
Chris

 
 Posted:   Jan 9, 2013 - 5:45 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Hi, Chris.

In this 8-minute YouTube clip, one can hear the "Aye - A Beggar" cue start around 2:50 minutes. The music between 3:34 & 3:48 is the sort of dissonance I'm refering to which can be heard during a number of early sequences (prior to the battle scenes) & which Intrada has chosen not to provide sound clips on.

 
 Posted:   Jan 9, 2013 - 6:03 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Here's a scan of the LP's reverse side:

 
 Posted:   Jan 9, 2013 - 12:18 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Intrada is like a one armed bandit spewing out punter jackpot material non-stop. Only trouble is I don't have the capacity to bag it all. But I'll do my best.

Well done for this crowning . . . bauble!

The male singing on the third sample track actually reminds me more of Dunbar rather than Naseby. The famous painting by A. C. Gow of the Roundheads recounting the 118th Psalm (with their backs to the sea) before their unlikely yet tremendous victory over the scots keeps barging in on the music.

 
 Posted:   Jan 9, 2013 - 6:19 PM   
 By:   MusicUnite   (Member)

Not sure if the over-prize tag of $25 for this 2 CD set is due to a contractual agreement with Sony, perhaps forcing Intrada to use the LP contents (which I don't think anyone cares about) for this release, or that Intrada is merely milking it for all they can get.

I find the second CD to be superfluous. If you want to hear the dialogue, you might as well just watch the DVD.

I am actually looking forward to the liner notes more than anything. Most of the track titles match Cordell's own personal listing, although there are some differences. The film was cut-down, whole scenes were jettisoned and thus a lot of the music was truncated or simply not used in the finished movie.

 
 Posted:   Jan 9, 2013 - 6:53 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Hi, MusicUnite.

I'm quite curious about the unused cues, too.

Alec Guiness playing "Blind Man's Bluff" with children is rather brief in the movie and I don't recall any music being used in those scenes.
However, the largest curio is probably the 7(!) minutes for "Prelude To Execution" of which I don't think any of this music is used in the final print.

Intrada's online track listing for CD #1 offer no indication of which tracks are thoroughly unused and/or partially used or otherwise different than heard in the film.

Do you have a source of info regarding Cordell's personal data on CROMWELL (and any other Cordell score, for that matter)?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2013 - 4:07 AM   
 By:   chriscoyle   (Member)

Hi, Chris.

In this 8-minute YouTube clip, one can hear the "Aye - A Beggar" cue start around 2:50 minutes. The music between 3:34 & 3:48 is the sort of dissonance I'm refering to which can be heard during a number of early sequences (prior to the battle scenes) & which Intrada has chosen not to provide sound clips on.



ToneRow thanks for the clip. Knowing nothing about this movie I am more curious to hear the entire score. I better set my DVR today for next week so I don't forget!
Chris

 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2013 - 5:19 AM   
 By:   MusicUnite   (Member)


Intrada's online track listing for CD #1 offer no indication of which tracks are thoroughly unused and/or partially used or otherwise different than heard in the film.

Do you have a source of info regarding Cordell's personal data on CROMWELL (and any other Cordell score, for that matter)?


Alas, I have no inside info on "Cromwell" or other Cordell scores. I had a track listing many moons ago and was merely recalling the titles.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2013 - 2:01 PM   
 By:   scoreman42   (Member)

Anyone receive their copy of Cromwell? And what do you think of the whole score?

Thanks

 
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