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 Posted:   Jun 21, 2013 - 3:37 AM   
 By:   Kari Tuhkanen   (Member)

Becoming Colette. Shades of Sibelius (The Swan of Tuonela), Debussy. Wonderfully sweet music; very strong, beautiful main theme, Scott´s own lovely fin de siècle pieces, couple of secondary equally nice themes. Composer´s trademarks, shimmering strings and clear woodwind writing at full display. Solo guitar adds great charm.
Another forgotten gem.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2013 - 6:04 AM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

Becoming Colette. Shades of Sibelius (The Swan of Tuonela), Debussy. Wonderfully sweet music; very strong, beautiful main theme, Scott´s own lovely fin de siècle pieces, couple of secondary equally nice themes. Composer´s trademarks, shimmering strings and clear woodwind writing at full display. Solo guitar adds great charm.
Another forgotten gem.


This score is FANTASTIC and a true must-have. I would actually rank it as one of his best; So many amazing highlights. The overture is brilliant, and the redemptive/heartbreaking finale music is superb Scott. Great shout out on that one - Apparently the movie has barely ever been seen, though I discovered a few short months ago that my school's archive has a 35mm print of it.

I like to listen to this score as something of a "companion piece" with Williams' JANE EYRE, Rombi's ANGEL, Rodney Bennett's LADY CAROLINE LAMB, Towns' THE BUCCANEERS and Fenton's DANGEROUS BEAUTY in a "Lushly elegant period romance" playlist I've created in iTunes. They all feel like they're cut from the same type of cloth, and they're all wonderful. I even threw in Richard Band's title theme from HOUSE ON SORORITY ROW because it fit the idiom so well!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2013 - 6:13 PM   
 By:   Mr. Shark   (Member)

What are Scott's classical influences in these cues?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4n21vNQWWg&list=PL447D0BB08F85FD3F

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbgoHuyUHMM&list=PL447D0BB08F85FD3F

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uw9PDED-8E4

Gotta love that flexatone!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2013 - 3:56 AM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

What are Scott's classical influences in these cues?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4n21vNQWWg&list=PL447D0BB08F85FD3F

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbgoHuyUHMM&list=PL447D0BB08F85FD3F

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uw9PDED-8E4

Gotta love that flexatone!


In those cases, I'd say mostly Stravinsky.

An interesting note... John Corigliano was originally approached to score GREYSTOKE. Perhaps that's why it's no stretch of the imagination that Scott's brilliant score seems to be cut from the same cloth as both the violent and romantic side of ALTERED STATES?

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2013 - 4:01 AM   
 By:   Mr. Shark   (Member)

What are Scott's classical influences in these cues?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4n21vNQWWg&list=PL447D0BB08F85FD3F

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbgoHuyUHMM&list=PL447D0BB08F85FD3F

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uw9PDED-8E4

Gotta love that flexatone!


In those cases, I'd say mostly Stravinsky.

An interesting note... John Corigliano was originally approached to score GREYSTOKE. Perhaps that's why it's no stretch of the imagination that Scott's brilliant score seems to be cut from the same cloth as both the violent and romantic side of ALTERED STATES?


I can definitely hear more Corigliano than Stravinsky in the GREYSTOKE cues, what with the use of tone clusters. I wouldn't be surprised if some of the film was temped with cues from ALTERED STATES.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2013 - 5:06 AM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

What are Scott's classical influences in these cues?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4n21vNQWWg&list=PL447D0BB08F85FD3F

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbgoHuyUHMM&list=PL447D0BB08F85FD3F

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uw9PDED-8E4

Gotta love that flexatone!


In those cases, I'd say mostly Stravinsky.

An interesting note... John Corigliano was originally approached to score GREYSTOKE. Perhaps that's why it's no stretch of the imagination that Scott's brilliant score seems to be cut from the same cloth as both the violent and romantic side of ALTERED STATES?


I can definitely hear more Corigliano than Stravinsky in the GREYSTOKE cues, what with the use of tone clusters. I wouldn't be surprised if some of the film was temped with cues from ALTERED STATES.



Indeed. And yet MORE interesting facts... KING KONG LIVES was by turn temped with GREYSTOKE (according to Scott himself)... Which explains why those two make great companion pieces!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2013 - 5:13 AM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

By the way, can anyone who's seen GREYSTOKE comment on what music is missing? I've read that A.) The LP/CD arrangement represents not even half the score, and B.) A lot, if not most, of the music from the first half of the film is missing from previous releases.

Anyone care to describe what hasn't been released?

 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2013 - 9:34 AM   
 By:   The Beach Bum   (Member)

By the way, can anyone who's seen GREYSTOKE comment on what music is missing? I've read that A.) The LP/CD arrangement represents not even half the score, and B.) A lot, if not most, of the music from the first half of the film is missing from previous releases.

Anyone care to describe what hasn't been released?


I haven't seen the film in a long time, but I remember there's a really good cue for the scene where young Tarzan and his chimp playmate are attacked by a wildcat, and he swims to safety. Later there is a very ferocious cue where the adult Tarzan finally kills the wildcat. Also good is the cue for the scene where his ape mother is killed (which is referenced later in the film when his "father" dies after being shot in London).

There are also more excerpts from Elgar's Symphony #2 used in the film, as in the scene where D'Arnot tries to explain to Tarzan that he has a human family in another land. This worked so well in the scene that I initially assumed it was written for the film by Scott!

 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2013 - 12:38 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Basil Dearden's 1962 film ALL NIGHT LONG features "Johnny Scott" onscreen! Scott plays both flute and saxophone.

You can see him on the right in the YouTube clip:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyXAXxvgbUY&feature=player_detailpage

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2013 - 1:24 PM   
 By:   Kari Tuhkanen   (Member)

By the way, can anyone who's seen GREYSTOKE comment on what music is missing? I've read that A.) The LP/CD arrangement represents not even half the score, and B.) A lot, if not most, of the music from the first half of the film is missing from previous releases.

Anyone care to describe what hasn't been released?


Most of the unreleased music appears in the jungle scenes during the first hour or so (the CD has still some 20 minutes of material from the first half of the film though), especially during Tarzan´s childhood, when he is learning the ways of the jungle; more of Scott´s sumptuous, absolutely intoxicating music. Tarzan/The Family Theme has some beautiful variations alternating with savage action music. There are more or less 20 minutes of unreleased music by my reckoning. So the whole score (excluding Elgar and some source music) lasts some 50 plus minutes! Rather sparse for over 2-hour film.
I recall that John Scott mentioned in an interview not that long ago, that he was in a process of re-recording the whole score. I wonder what happened to that!

 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2013 - 1:30 PM   
 By:   JohnnyG   (Member)

Basil Dearden's 1962 film ALL NIGHT LONG features "Johnny Scott" onscreen! Scott plays both flute and saxophone.

You can see him on the right in the YouTube clip:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyXAXxvgbUY&feature=player_detailpage



Great clip! Thanks!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2013 - 1:45 PM   
 By:   Kari Tuhkanen   (Member)

Thanks for the clip!
There are also two other Scott performances (BBC FOUR) in YouTube: The Johnny Scott Quintet - Donna Lee and Othello from 1964. On flute.

 
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