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 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 5:46 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

That people who like horror scores must be crazy or mental, something to that extent.

And yes, I am a bit crazy big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 6:13 AM   
 By:   eriknelson   (Member)

Well, how about Andre Previn's story of the MGM big wig* who, having been informed by a lackey that something he didn't like in a Main Title was a minor cord, promptly issued a directive to the music department to the effect that "From Now on there are to be no minor cords in any MGM picture." Always a hard one to top. smile

*(Was it Mayer himself?)


No, it was Irving Thalberg.

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 6:16 AM   
 By:   Heath   (Member)

I had a neighbor, who was also a film student, announce to me,

"There are two kinds of film music!

First, there's The Theme. That's what you whistle when you go out of the theater.

And then there's the stuff that plays behind everything else. That's the stuff that goes [half-singing] 'doo-doo, doo-doo'."


LOL... but y'know what's really funny? He's right.

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 6:41 AM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)

I never heard anyone say the music in Jaw's or Star Wars was obtrusive at the time. Even from ppl who couldn't care less about the film score. Or even the 50's classics for that matter. To much credence given to the vocal minority. Most ppl simply don't care either way.

When it comes to John Williams, he's somewhat of an exception, but mostly people remember his themes (Star Wars, Superman, Indiana Jones, Jaws) and think the majority of film music was composed by him. John Williams was never a subtle composer, either, especially during the peak of his popularity. Other wise, you're right, most people don't care about the music.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 7:00 AM   
 By:   Mr. Shark   (Member)

John Williams was never a subtle composer, either

IMAGES and THE FURY weren't subtle?

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 7:02 AM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

I watched Friends With Benefits the other day, and there's a pretty amusing scene where Justin Timberlake and Mila Kunis are watching a generic romcom on TV and Kunis starts grousing about the "bad" musical score, causing Timberlake to start imitating the music clich├ęs on the soundtrack.

Ever since I started collecting movie soundtrack over 20 years ago(!), my family has...tolerated my hobby, but they've never really understood it. Occasionally I'd get a "Oh, that's pretty..." compliment, but I'd also get comments like, "How can you even hear that through all the dialogue?" roll eyes I mean, I can totally understand why the average moviegoer can watch a movie now and not notice the music...because there's precious little "music" being written for film these days, it's all just eardrum-bashing white noise that's completely indistinguishable from the already-overblown sound design of contemporary blockbuster filmmaking. But how one can not notice the music for a film like E.T., The Wind & The Lion or The Magnificent Seven I'll never know.

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 7:54 AM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)

John Williams was never a subtle composer, either

IMAGES and THE FURY weren't subtle?


I'm unfamiliar with Images. The Fury? Subtle? Nope, but it fits the over the top film perfectly.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 8:04 AM   
 By:   Mr. Shark   (Member)

John Williams was never a subtle composer, either

IMAGES and THE FURY weren't subtle?


I'm unfamiliar with Images. The Fury? Subtle? Nope, but it fits the over the top film perfectly.


THE FURY probably wasn't the best example, but it's easy to forget how subtle a lot of Williams's more dissonant, quasi-atonal underscore can be. See BLACK SUNDAY or THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 8:09 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

A best mates girlfriend, they'd just returned from seeing Mission Impossible II, she knew my love for film scores and said 'you like film scores so you'll love it'. An assumption that just because it's a film score then I'll like it. For the record, I can't stand Zimmer's score.

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 8:13 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

"Zimmer tries to approach each score with a serious and open minded attitude.
Take for example alan Silvestri, who i think is terrific. He is going to write an Alan Silvestri score for whatever film he works on."
"Zimmer approaches each score with a dramatic sensibility. Wheter he comes up with an inspired score or not, his approach is refreshing."
brm

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 8:18 AM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)


THE FURY probably wasn't the best example, but it's easy to forget how subtle a lot of Williams's more dissonant, quasi-atonal underscore can be. See BLACK SUNDAY or THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE.


Fair enough. Perhaps I should have said his more well known scores (the stuff everyone knows) were hardly subtle.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 8:20 AM   
 By:   deglialberi   (Member)

Worst thing I ever heard about film music was at a gathering in my dorm room at college. A bunch of us were laughing and having a great time on a Saturday night. I had a few Morricone and Goldsmith tracks playing in the background when someone called out, "OK, enough of this - let's hear some REAL music."

Hurts just to recount it.

-Ned

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 10:55 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Not so much an asinine statement but I remember a co-worker enjoyed listening to The Lion King and Aladdin. (The songs of course) But when I spun LOTR's he asked me to turn it off.

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 12:15 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

"Zimmer tries to approach each score with a serious and open minded attitude.
Take for example alan Silvestri, who i think is terrific. He is going to write an Alan Silvestri score for whatever film he works on."
"Zimmer approaches each score with a dramatic sensibility. Wheter he comes up with an inspired score or not, his approach is refreshing."
brm


Is that the best you can do?

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 12:47 PM   
 By:   JamesSouthall   (Member)

Jerry Goldsmith said he was driving in a car with Pandro Berman, who produced The Prize. A piece of music came on the radio and Berman said "You should have used that as the theme for The Prize." Goldsmith said "That IS the theme for The Prize."

 
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