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 Posted:   Jul 1, 2013 - 7:00 AM   
 By:   meegle   (Member)

Wow. Glad to see I'm not alone. Thanks to all of you for the community appreciation and thanks especially to Morricone for that very spiritual self-disclosure that I feel most if not all of us can identify with. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2013 - 8:47 AM   
 By:   facehugger   (Member)

Thankfully, I have the capacity to enjoy both Hans Zimmer AND Jerry Goldsmith. wink



That's some impressive superpower you got there!

Do you have to be irradiated by gamma rays to develop such awesome power?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2013 - 8:55 AM   
 By:   nerfTractor   (Member)

I miss Jerry's music from his prime (my favorite years were mid-70's to late 80's). He was probably my favorite of them all, along with Williams. In Jerry's later years, I just couldn't develop the same enthusiasm, although I would take any less inspired score by Jerry over practically any soundtrack of the last five years. But when he passed, I honestly didn't feel like we were robbed of a great career. We got so much from him over the years.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2013 - 2:34 PM   
 By:   bluejohn1984   (Member)

I saw this thread and it struck a chord. I have to agree. I miss him too. I've been a soundtrack fan for 30 years, always with one ear on the music whenever I go to the cinema, and I have to say that most scores these days just don't excite me.

I listen to my older scores for Williams, Elfman, Barry, Bernstein and of course Goldsmith, and just don't hear the same craftsmanship in many modern scores. I listen to say the Rebirth track of Poltergeist and it's so classical in it's construction, full of feeling, power, and themes. I loved Goldsmith, his music had it all, and he rarely repeated himself, constructing new themes for each film. I wish he'd done the original Judge Dredd film, as just his trailer music got the blood pumping.

I know Zimmer and his ilk have been blamed for the simplification of film music, which I feel is a bit unfair, as tastes do seem to change with the passing decades, but I do feel we have lost something with many scores now being quite a dull listening experience. I just feel many scores are so incidental, and pass by with no impression.

Maybe scores more to my taste can be found in foreign films, of which I'm afraid i know little, away from the likes of Hollywood.

Anyway, thank you for raising this thread which I've thought about for some time. I just hope there will come a time when I can get excited about film music again, when the trends change again.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 10:21 AM   
 By:   meegle   (Member)

I saw this thread and it struck a chord. I have to agree. I miss him too. I've been a soundtrack fan for 30 years, always with one ear on the music whenever I go to the cinema, and I have to say that most scores these days just don't excite me.

I listen to my older scores for Williams, Elfman, Barry, Bernstein and of course Goldsmith, and just don't hear the same craftsmanship in many modern scores. I listen to say the Rebirth track of Poltergeist and it's so classical in it's construction, full of feeling, power, and themes. I loved Goldsmith, his music had it all, and he rarely repeated himself, constructing new themes for each film. I wish he'd done the original Judge Dredd film, as just his trailer music got the blood pumping.

I know Zimmer and his ilk have been blamed for the simplification of film music, which I feel is a bit unfair, as tastes do seem to change with the passing decades, but I do feel we have lost something with many scores now being quite a dull listening experience. I just feel many scores are so incidental, and pass by with no impression.

Maybe scores more to my taste can be found in foreign films, of which I'm afraid i know little, away from the likes of Hollywood.

Anyway, thank you for raising this thread which I've thought about for some time. I just hope there will come a time when I can get excited about film music again, when the trends change again.


VERY well said.

Rebirth is THE reason to main course of Poltergeist and is so very evocative. I completely agree with you and wonder if we're correct about today's music...or are we just oldies that aren't changing with the times? (No matter how dull the new times appear to be music-wise)

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 10:25 AM   
 By:   Bob Bryden   (Member)

So do I. Having just done a complete review of all his scores chronologically, I was amazed at how rarely he repeated himself (there were a batch from 'Chain Reaction' on where he used the same 4-note motif - at least his 'danger motif' was his own creation - ha!). Considering the vastness of his output, only Morricone rivals him for keeping things interesting.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 10:40 AM   
 By:   Paul Lawler   (Member)

I agree with this. My all time favourite score is 'First Blood', nothing comes close to the orchestration and writing in my opinion. I also live in dread for the day Morricone is gone.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 10:48 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

meegle:
[...] wonder if we're correct about today's music...or are we just oldies that aren't changing with the times? (No matter how dull the new times appear to be music-wise)


No. You're correct.

Acknowledging the problem is the first step toward fixing it*.




* = this will not be a popular post for some members. ;-)

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 10:53 AM   
 By:   Paul Lawler   (Member)

I think part of the problem with modern scores is that directors more often than not want cutting edge sounding sound design scores rather than melodic/epic.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 10:46 PM   
 By:   meegle   (Member)

I think part of the problem with modern scores is that directors more often than not want cutting edge sounding sound design scores rather than melodic/epic.

At one point in the distant past the blaster-beam was cutting edge no?
Star Trek The Motion Picture is my favorite score of all time!!!! smile smile smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 11:04 PM   
 By:   meegle   (Member)

meegle:
[...] wonder if we're correct about today's music...or are we just oldies that aren't changing with the times? (No matter how dull the new times appear to be music-wise)


No. You're correct.

Acknowledging the problem is the first step toward fixing it*.




* = this will not be a popular post for some members. ;-)


Well now I'm scared for having brought this up then. razz

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2013 - 2:56 AM   
 By:   bluejohn1984   (Member)

I think part of the problem with modern scores is that directors more often than not want cutting edge sounding sound design scores rather than melodic/epic.

I totally agree, this is how it feels these days. I watched the 3rd Man Of Steel trailer and loved the music, so i immediately ordered the deluxe 2 cd edition. Then i watched the film and went 'oh, it's more sound scapes than thematic scoring', and found that most of the music from that trailer was from the last couple of minutes of the film. Now, i don't mind a bit of sound scape music, i find it relaxing, and Zimmer is very good at it. it just wasn't what i was expecting.

As another poster implied, yes, maybe i just like a particular type of scoring which has past. Jerry's score for Alien was to me a wonderful unearthly score, whereas Prometheus in the whole left me cold.

Changing times.......

 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2013 - 3:01 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

What's marvellous about Alien and most of Goldsmith's experimental scores is that they combine original soundscape designs with thematic scoring, melodies, etc.

In that sense, no one was more brilliant. You might like the music of another composer more, but I think it is fair to say no one demonstrated brilliance in both breadth and depth simultaneously as Mr. Goldsmith.

Cheers

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2013 - 10:03 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

meegle:
[...] wonder if we're correct about today's music...or are we just oldies that aren't changing with the times? (No matter how dull the new times appear to be music-wise)


No. You're correct.

Acknowledging the problem is the first step toward fixing it*.
* = this will not be a popular post for some members. ;-)


And the part of the problem that is never addressed. That the problem has always existed. When Miklos Rozsa complains about 10% of Hollywood composers being well trained and the rest "adapters" he is being his usual grumpy elitist self, but his numbers are not THAT far off. When fans rattle off a dozen or so scores that were Golden during 1939, or whatever their favorite year was, they tend to ignore the 90% that wasn't so good. If you are in the midst of a what you may think is a wonderful movie music era you are probably young and not paying attention to the oldsters around saying "yeah but there is so little of it". And then there is everyone of us who is guilty of loving some not so good music simply because it plugs into our childhood. The old guys are equally guilty as the young of that and come up with excuses like "those guys were better trained than today's hacks". The truth is when you are a lower echelon composer you are not given enough time and are constrained heavily by what is out there and it all comes up mush. Mush that you will love if you are hearing in your youth.

So when I say where the talent is has always moved around and you have got to look at unexpected places I mean WHEREEVER it is. When SAE has that Moviemedia sale I unearthed a number of modern composers that have had Golden moments in independent and foreign films. Giacchino worked his way from the gaming composers. And listen to some finales this guy put together from my new poster boy of current neglected film composers Roque BaƱos (he inherited it from Desplat). I would have picked a different selection with more of his wonderful themes but you have so much to pick from you really can't go wrong. I think Jerry would be impressed.


 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2013 - 10:43 AM   
 By:   Warlok   (Member)

I think what was Maestro Goldsmith`s greatest trait was his unrelenting drive to compose something new. He had certain patterns or trademarks, but most of his scores had their own undeniable character in melody or beat.

This was experimentation, driven by a master who could wield that and hammer it into a cohesive tapestry.

(And I think his son was well on the way to following in those excellent footsteps.)

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 4:18 PM   
 By:   meegle   (Member)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMgY5nzC4RQ

Just wow.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 7:48 PM   
 By:   peterproud   (Member)

What's marvellous about Alien and most of Goldsmith's experimental scores is that they combine original soundscape designs with thematic scoring, melodies, etc.

In that sense, no one was more brilliant. You might like the music of another composer more, but I think it is fair to say no one demonstrated brilliance in both breadth and depth simultaneously as Mr. Goldsmith.

Cheers


That's a great observation Stephen...one I hadn't ever really thought of. Goldsmith truly was breaking ground with his soundscape creations well before they have now become common place....and most were created acoustically unlike today.

 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2013 - 12:24 AM   
 By:   Steve H   (Member)

What I really miss about Goldsmith is no more better demonstrated than in the last Rambo and Expendables films. I think its fair to say that if he was still with us there's a more than even money chance that he would have been scoring them. As is, I find all of these films enjoyable action fair. Rambo 4 probably more so than the latter two. But add the Goldsmith factor and these films go from just enjoyable to absolute romp!
Yeah, I really miss him.

 
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