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 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 7:03 AM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

Well, not almost...when I called Goldsmith's agent to inquire about availability I was told he was completely tied up and that was that. There was no script sent ( John had just begun shooting ) for Mr. Goldsmith to reject...


You can chew on the notion that Henry Mancini was pitched by his agent for THE THING. When I expressed surprise his agent said he was " in a dark place " and would like to be considered for the film. Too big a leap for us, maybe, but it would have been fun to see what he came up with ( think EXPERIMENT IN TERROR )...


Welcome to the message board!

Thanks for clearing that up with the official word. I've been really enjoying your blog posts about the making of my favorite film of all-time.

Could you perhaps shed some light on how Ennio spotted and scored the film? and how the "heartbeat" theme came about? It sounds so much like a Carpenter composition in terms of the keyboards that were used. Did Howarth and Carpenter collaborate on that piece with Ennio?
I'm aware that Carpenter and Howarth provided some all-synth cues such as the main titles and Benning's death, etc.

From listening to the varese album, there is just SO much unused music. Did Ennio actually write to picture, or did he write a bunch of music that was meant to be "cherry picked" by the music editor / director?

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 7:21 AM   
 By:   Charles Thaxton   (Member)

If Jerry was repulsed by these films, why did he do DEEP RISING? ( a score I love, btw) smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 8:41 AM   
 By:   Tobias   (Member)

If Jerry was repulsed by these films, why did he do DEEP RISING? ( a score I love, btw) smile


That is easy to answer. It is well known that the director wanted him on his earlier movie (The Jungle Book ultimately scored by Basil Poledouris). So he persuaded him to score his next movie after that collaboration didn`t happen.

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 9:02 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Droning scores bore me to tears but Morricone's score for "The Thing" was right on and fits the film perfectly. It adds a great deal to the tension and drama.

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 9:39 AM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

Droning scores bore me to tears but Morricone's score for "The Thing" was right on and fits the film perfectly. It adds a great deal to the tension and drama.

This we can agree on. wink

The thought of my favorite director (Carpenter) and my favorite composer (Goldsmith) teaming up is a dream come true, but I wouldn't want "The Thing" any other way than how it ended up.

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 10:17 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

If Jerry was repulsed by these films, why did he do DEEP RISING? ( a score I love, btw) smile

Deep Rising isn't repulsive, it's tongue-in-cheek and not really that violent. The Thing is mean-spirited, devoid of humour and grisly in its details, Jerry was rightfully repulsed by that.

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 12:02 PM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

Let's get real here... Jerry Goldsmith should have scored everything in his time, plain and simple, every "thing."

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 12:15 PM   
 By:   DavidCorkum   (Member)

Deep Rising isn't repulsive, it's tongue-in-cheek and not really that violent. The Thing is mean-spirited, devoid of humour and grisly in its details, Jerry was rightfully repulsed by that.

As Mr.Cohen has now established, Goldsmith didn't reject The Thing, he was too busy to consider it.

I wonder what John Williams would have done with The Thing?

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 12:35 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

I love Williams, but I don't think his style would have been a good fit with the sense of doom and almost hopelessness that the film so perfectly evokes. The electronic "heartbeat" music is just perfect, IMO.

Maybe if he had gone in his Black Sunday mode, but even that has heroic flourishes and a sense of adventure despite the dark subject matter. Again, Williams is a master, but I just couldn't see it.

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 1:43 PM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

Let's get real here... Jerry Goldsmith should have scored everything in his time, plain and simple, every "thing."

YOR agrees with Ape!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 3:17 PM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

YOR agrees with Ape!

Of course. RoryR be anagram for yorR.

D.S.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 3:20 PM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

Deep Rising isn't repulsive, it's tongue-in-cheek and not really that violent. The Thing is mean-spirited, devoid of humour and grisly in its details, Jerry was rightfully repulsed by that.

Deep rising was a wannabe horror film ruined by bad comical relief overkill resulting in film that seemed as if noone took their job seriously and insulted the audience with a big fat "who cares, we got your money".
The thing was and is a true horror film that acknowledges that people under stressful conditions become less than a shiny example of their species.

D.S.

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 3:35 PM   
 By:   DavidCoscina   (Member)

I love Goldsmith and have only a select few Morricone scores I enjoy but in this case, Ennio really nailed that sense of desolation and eeriness. His sense of Bartokian harmony and melodic lines was a perfect compliment to Carpenter's essay on paranoia. I don't think Goldsmith would have gotten that. I think he would have scored the action with his patented violent dissonance that worked beautifully in Alien (and many other film scores) but it wouldn't have been right for The Thing. Beltrami totally missed the mark in his sequel score because he choose to approach it more literally than Morricone did.

I remember seeing the remake/prequel when it came out and thinking in my head "no no no, you got that cue all wrong!" The music actually took away from the effectiveness of the film. I actually respect what the filmmakers did with the atmosphere.

Something like Giacchino's Let Me In would have been more along the lines of what was needed. That slow, brooding type music.

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 4:00 PM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

YOR likes "Deep Rising".

A funny little trash movie!

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 4:22 PM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

I love Goldsmith and have only a select few Morricone scores I enjoy but in this case, Ennio really nailed that sense of desolation and eeriness. His sense of Bartokian harmony and melodic lines was a perfect compliment to Carpenter's essay on paranoia. I don't think Goldsmith would have gotten that. I think he would have scored the action with his patented violent dissonance that worked beautifully in Alien (and many other film scores) but it wouldn't have been right for The Thing. Beltrami totally missed the mark in his sequel score because he choose to approach it more literally than Morricone did.

I remember seeing the remake/prequel when it came out and thinking in my head "no no no, you got that cue all wrong!" The music actually took away from the effectiveness of the film. I actually respect what the filmmakers did with the atmosphere.

Something like Giacchino's Let Me In would have been more along the lines of what was needed. That slow, brooding type music.


YOR does not agree that Goldsmith would not be able to score "The Thing" the way the movie need. On the contrary, his score would turn the movie even better.

And YOR likes what Morricone did for the movie.

As for the sequel-prequel... well, the movie is very stupid and the score reflects that. But it is a good musical composition on its own merits.

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 5:28 PM   
 By:   DavidCoscina   (Member)

Well, Yor is entitled to his opinion and perhaps Jerry would have done a splendid job. But I don't envision a better score than what the film received, unless a print would come out that would include more of Morricone's work and less of the "heart beat" music.

.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2013 - 7:33 AM   
 By:   facehugger   (Member)

Beltrami totally missed the mark in his sequel score because he choose to approach it more literally than Morricone did.


While it's debatable whether Beltrami's general approach fits what people expect from "The Thing," it can't be denied that Beltrami's score is highly creative in orchestration and arrangement.

So much energy! Truly the music of Eldritch horror that would drive your neighbors INSANE.

Even Goldsmith himself in his prime wouldn't have done a better job IMO.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2013 - 7:41 AM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

Even Goldsmith himself in his prime wouldn't have done a better job IMO.

You are aware that heretic language like that can get you killed in this place, the Chuck Norris school of Jerry Goldsmith facts.
Rule 1 Jerry is the best
Rule 2 Jerry is a better composer than everone else
Rule 3 repeat rules 1 and 2 over and over again (preferably on a Goldsmith tune)
Rule 4 If Jerry composes a score, and someone else composes an equally good score, Jerry's score is better.
Rule 5 If Jerry composes a score, and someone else composes a better score, Jerry's score is better.
Rule 6 Denie rule 5 and repeat rule 3.

D.S.

 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2013 - 7:47 AM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

Lolz disco.

 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2013 - 7:56 AM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

Jerry Goldsmith facts.
Rule 1 Jerry is the best
Rule 2 Jerry is a better composer than everone else
Rule 3 repeat rules 1 and 2 over and over again (preferably on a Goldsmith tune)
Rule 4 If Jerry composes a score, and someone else composes an equally good score, Jerry's score is better.
Rule 5 If Jerry composes a score, and someone else composes a better score, Jerry's score is better.
Rule 6 Denie rule 5 and repeat rule 3.

D.S.


YOR agrees with this dude.

Goldsmith is indeed the best.

Even those without YOR's superior intellect can figure that.

 
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