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 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 9:16 PM   
 By:   aldan   (Member)

But a little of it, is Zimmer's original creation, only a litte

Aside from William Tell, the other most important theme from the movie, heard in its entirety in "silver" track, is fully based on "After The Battle of Aughrim", with much slower tempo, and some missing/altered notes. Which is a shame, because it's ranger+silver main theme

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 10:06 PM   
 By:   Bob Bryden   (Member)

Just in from seeing the film. Not nearly as bad as the critical consensus might suggest and I hate to say it - but despite a few obvious Morricone-isms, Zimmer has created a wonderful musical score.

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2013 - 11:03 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

Just in from seeing the film. Not nearly as bad as the critical consensus might suggest and I hate to say it - but despite a few obvious Morricone-isms, Zimmer has created a wonderful musical score.


"I hate to say it," he says.

Don't be ashamed, Bob. Embrace your inner Zimmer.



"One of us! One of us!"

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2013 - 12:26 AM   
 By:   CindyLover   (Member)

Obviously, Intrada had high hopes that this would be another high-profile smash like "The Avengers" was last year. But alas, the film is a monumental flop. Probably not a big problem for Intrada -- they don't have to make up hundreds of millions of dollars. But a shame for them that they can't hitch their wagon to a smash film.

Oz The Great And Powerful was hardly a dud with almost $500 million (domestic + international).

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 11:18 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

I wasn’t really very enamored Man Of Steel, the movie or the music, but I must say
that I did enjoy many parts of The Lone Ranger. I also like the music. Some of you have
referred to Morriconeisms or spaghetti western references. I’m really not sure how to word
this. Where I heard Morricone was in the underlying orchestrations for one of Zimmer’s
main themes. His theme didn’t sound like Morricone, but his background, swirling
orchestrations reminded me of his music from One Upon A Time In The West. I’m
specifically referring to the music near the end during the stand-off between Fonda and
Bronson. Even my husband sensed some previous musical reference.

I also loved the way he used The William Tell Overture. After it played a while, Zimmer
once again kept the Overture’s underlying rhythms and orchestrations while
layering his theme on top. I thought it was very effective.

Did anyone see or recognize a homage scene or reference scene (not music) to
John Ford’s The Searchers? I’m now wondering if there were other scenes and possibly
music in The Lone Ranger that referenced other past movies that I missed?

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 3:52 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

I think The Searchers homage was during the moments right before the assault on the homestead by the fake Indians. It seemed to be similar visually.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 4:00 PM   
 By:   JamesSouthall   (Member)

In response to literally no public demand whatsoever, I wrote a review of this score:

http://www.movie-wave.net/?p=3787

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 4:24 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

In response to literally no public demand whatsoever, I wrote a review of this score:

http://www.movie-wave.net/?p=3787



Cool. I loved the score and flick.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 5:23 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

I always enjoy James' music reviews, and I agree with all that you wrote. Thanks for posting it. I may have missed it earlier.

Mutant, you get an A+. That is the same scene that I thought was The Searchers' scene homage.

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 6:25 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

I always enjoy James' music reviews, and I agree with all that you wrote. Thanks for posting it. I may have missed it earlier.

Mutant, you get an A+. That is the same scene that I thought was The Searchers' scene homage.


That's the first time I've gotten an A+ in anything! big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 10:48 PM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

In response to literally no public demand whatsoever, I wrote a review of this score:

http://www.movie-wave.net/?p=3787



Great review - I wish you could meet my old mum, because she might realise that i'm actually not that sarcastic after all.

You also made me want to hear the score. I don't know if that was your intention.

TG

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 11:44 PM   
 By:   Tango Urilla   (Member)

Great to hear all the positive buzz about Lone Ranger. Sounds like it's one heck of a score. I wasn't planning on seeing the movie, but I'll definitely check out the music at some point.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2013 - 3:28 PM   
 By:   Bob S   (Member)

Is this where I put in a shameless, gratuitous plug for John Barry's THE LEGEND OF THE LONE RANGER (1981)? I just watched the (excrable) old Lionsgate DVD (looks like a transfer from pan/scan VHS tape) and found the film not nearly so bad as its unsavory reputation. It has a couple nice set pieces and supporting actors like Christopher Lloyd (with hair!) and Jason Robards. It's a solid B Movie Western released at a time when Westerns had already long been out of favor.

Maestro Barry's music is exciting and a pleasure to listen to, and his interweaving of the obligatory Rossini skillful indeed.

We need this pre-DANCES WITH WOLVES Barry western on CD. In the best of all possible worlds, Twilight Time would bring us a clean, widescreen Blu-ray transfer of the film with isolated music tracks.

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2013 - 12:44 AM   
 By:   McD   (Member)

In response to literally no public demand whatsoever, I wrote a review of this score:

http://www.movie-wave.net/?p=3787


Hilarious review, great read.

The Jimmy White reference went over my head though (and as a Brit I know who he is). Unless it was just a bit of completely random surrealism.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 2, 2013 - 5:15 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

IGNORE THE CRITICS! Fantastic film. Fantastic score. The last time I enjoyed a film and it's score together nearly as much as this was The Return of the King. I loved almost every second. Sure, it could have left out the rabbits, the unnecessary framing sequence, and not had the Ranger himself be quite such a reluctant hero (though the latter would surely be adjusted to more confident throughout in the now highly unlikely sequel), but all in all, wonderful. The critics have never got it more wrong. So glad my fondness for the character meant they never had any effect on my choice to see it. Only the speed at which I had to get to the cinema because of their successful, and grossly unfair, hatchet job.

I'm not as perhaps over-familiar with Zimmer's work as some on here, which probably worked to my advantage, as I continue to listen and really, really enjoy this incredible score. It's crammed with great sounds, melodies and orchestral colour with influences broadly and proudly displayed, leading to the most exhilarating version of the famous William Tell Overture yet.

One classical piece I do hear though, is Dvorak's Largo in the track 'Home'. And yes those Morricone moments are there. As Joan says the Fonda and Bronson showdown from that film is referenced in the "swirling orchestrations". It's the three note sound I remember just as that piece in Once Upon a Time is about to start, which at the same time has a jingly sound on top of it, not dissimilar to the pocket watch motif in the second and third of the Dollars Trilogy. But there's also Zimmer's use of the electric guitar at the start of 'Ride'.

What a great shame we won't get a series. I'd look forward to more adventures of the Lone Ranger and Tonto much more than those of Jack Sparrow and co. And more scores like this to go with it.

Ruddy marvelous.

 
 Posted:   Sep 2, 2013 - 6:58 PM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

 
 Posted:   Sep 2, 2013 - 8:28 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

I agree with the general idea in this thread that this is a step in the right direction for Zimmer. Mostly a solid score and quite good.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 3, 2013 - 9:29 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

IGNORE THE CRITICS! Fantastic film. Fantastic score. The last time I enjoyed a film and it's score together nearly as much as this was The Return of the King. I loved almost every second. Sure, it could have left out the rabbits, the unnecessary framing sequence, and not had the Ranger himself be quite such a reluctant hero (though the latter would surely be adjusted to more confident throughout in the now highly unlikely sequel), but all in all, wonderful. The critics have never got it more wrong. So glad my fondness for the character meant they never had any effect on my choice to see it. Only the speed at which I had to get to the cinema because of their successful, and grossly unfair, hatchet job.



Ruddy marvelous.


@
Paul

Agree, the film was rather unfairly maligned.
I think it is too long for sure, but other than that, I think the issue was that people wanted a more comic book approach with less violence, and it is rather (realistically) violent. Occasionally it is more violent than required by the story. The flashbacks from SF could have been entirely lifted out. Other than these quibbles, it is really not a terrible film, or a bad one, it is rather entertaining.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 3, 2013 - 10:24 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

As there seems to be a reasonable opinion around that at the very least, this movie isn't half as bad as these critics said it was, does anyone have any theories as to why there was SUCH a downer on it?

I remember seeing at least one remark that had the words "anti-american", I'm pretty sure. And the film both ups the importance of the native american, as well as painting the US Cavalry in a bad light. But these have both been done before anyway so I'm at a loss. This film is way better than ANY Star Wars prequel, and for me the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise.

So. What gives?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 3, 2013 - 10:30 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

As there seems to be a reasonable opinion around that at the very least, this movie isn't half as bad as these critics said it was, does anyone have any theories as to why there was SUCH a downer on it?

I remember seeing at least one remark that had the words "anti-american", I'm pretty sure. And the film both ups the importance of the native american, as well as painting the US Cavalry in a bad light. But these have both been done before anyway so I'm at a loss. This film is way better than ANY Star Wars prequel, and for me the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise.

So. What gives?


@Paul,
not sure really, maybe people like more popcorn fluff? Although Iron Man 3 and Star Trek were pretty violent and dark too. Though you could say that the violence of LR is more 'natural and realistic' ie, on earth and historical referenced events that happened. So realistic violence is less palatable to some people. The simplest answer is the length of the picture at 149 minutes it is probably about 29 minutes too long for most people. I really think cutting out SF frames would have cut out around 20 minutes or more, (not sure how long those scenes are) and that would have improved the pace of the picture, the straightforwardness of the narrative. This would have netted better reviews and more viewers I think. Just a guess.

 
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