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 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 6:20 AM   
 By:   mark ford   (Member)

Craig Safan. He got off to a promising start in the 80s (THE LAST STARFIGHTER), worked steadily in TV through the 90s (SON OF THE MORNING STAR), but faded away after 2000. Glad to see him coming to filmmusic events recently. Great guy.

Bruce Broughton. He's been mentioned here several times already.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 6:27 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

How about Marc Shaiman?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 6:49 AM   
 By:   Kim Tong   (Member)

Would be great to see Broughton and Safan make a come back. But in today standards they are old school because they can write themes.

 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 6:52 AM   
 By:   TominAtl   (Member)

Edward Shearmur. I love his scores from "Reign of Fire" and his best score, "The Count of Monte Cristo" gets a lot of play. He wrote a full throttle, melody rich score to "Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow".

Since then, he's done a lot of small movies and films that generated little to no buzz and flops though John Singleton seems to have liked working with him. I am not sure why he isn't in the A list but I would love to hear him do some of the event pictures that are dominated by Zimmer and Co, Beltrami, etc.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 7:56 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)



But can Ed Shearmur write in the Zimmer style?

 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 8:31 AM   
 By:   The Projectionist   (Member)

Wheres Graeme Revell, Randy Edelman?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 8:36 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Many of the composers mentioned here are still doing scores, just not high-profile ones.

 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 8:46 AM   
 By:   SBD   (Member)

Marc Shaiman - Reunited with Billy Crystal (and, you could argue, Bette Midler) on last year's PARENTAL GUIDANCE. He's doing pretty well for stage shows, I believe.

Graeme Revell - Isn't he doing RIDDICK?

And that just breaks my heart about Richard Band. I mean, surely someone could grant him an opportunity to write a score to rival his best work. Just sad.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 8:52 AM   
 By:   counterpoint   (Member)

David Newman unfortunately.

Don`t know why that is. Lately he scored 2 low budget electronic Scooby Doo TV scores and a low budget electronic score to the direct to DVD film A Christmas Story 2. All 3 films were directed by Brian Levant who has hired Newman almost always. Interesting to notice that Levant`s career obviously went downhill as well. I mean that man directed some big hits in the 90s. And now he`s doing low budget TV movies and low budget direct to DVD stuff.

The only major movie Newman did during the last 3 years was Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son. And that score wasn`t exactly a huge orchestral work but more or less some suspense cues in a hip R ā€™nā€™ B style.

Compared to Newman`s high profile and hit movie output during the 90s and 2000s this is truly remarkable. I guess it has to do with knowing the right people and having the right connections. Obviously Hans Zimmer has better connections frown

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 8:57 AM   
 By:   Smaug   (Member)

If you aren't hearing from them it's safe to say they are waiting by the phone.

For composers who have "other careers" like Glass, Goldenthal, and Corigliano-they don't have all their eggs in the film score basket. Glass had two operas premiered at major houses this year-17 of his operas were done. Goldenthal is currently writing music for a new Midsummer Night's Dream for a new theater in Brooklyn, and Corigliano is always working-just check out his worklist.

As for composers who "dabble" in non film music: I'm not sure what Don Davis is doing. His one opera was like 5 or 6 years ago. If film scoring wasn't happening then he could have written a lot of other stuff in that time. But it's kind of the same thing, waiting by the phone. The Met Opera and the Boston Symphony aren't exactly beating down the door of any of these guys.

 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 9:21 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

In the end, the WHY on so many talented composers aren't working anymore comes down to one man, and one man only. Hans Zimmer.

 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 9:26 AM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

In the end, the WHY on so many talented composers aren't working anymore comes down to one man, and one man only. Hans Zimmer.

This is a sad, sad truth.

 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 9:27 AM   
 By:   Stefancos   (Member)

No, not quite. He doesn't admit it, but I've clearly seen signs of it every time I've met him over the last three years. At least he's working steadily -- if slowly -- with various projects, both film and otherwise.

What exactly did you notice?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 9:30 AM   
 By:   levelstein   (Member)

Hello everyone,

i'm new here, i've been reading this forum for almost ten years but it's my first time posting.
I'm french so forgive me already if i make mistakes.

I also am sad to witness the disappearing of some talented composers.
I almost want to add David Arnold to this topic.
Ok he did some movies in the last few years, but that's too bad he is not getting any of the big movies sometimes.
i really don't understand how he hasn't been approached (or maybe he was i don'tnkow) for any of the superhero movies....

And add to that there is great chances that he won't score the next bond movie now that Mendes is back :-(

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 9:42 AM   
 By:   The CinemaScope Cat   (Member)

David Amram!

He composed three superb scores for high profile fims in a row: The Young Savages, Splendor In The Grass and The Manchurian Candidate. One would think a prolific career scoring films would have been in his future but since 1962's Manchurian Candidate, he's scored only 3 feature films.

Sure he's scored some documentaries, shorts and 2 TV movies but all total, that's a mere 20 titles in 53 years!

 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 10:03 AM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

David Newman unfortunately.

It pissed me off when Newman wasn't allowed to score any of the five thousand Ice Age sequels, because his score for the original was one of his best, and it would have been nice to hear him develop his themes in the follow-up movies. No offense to John Powell, but he had a firm hammerlock on all CGI animated movies for a while there.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 10:03 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

No, not quite. He doesn't admit it, but I've clearly seen signs of it every time I've met him over the last three years. At least he's working steadily -- if slowly -- with various projects, both film and otherwise.

What exactly did you notice?


Slurred speech, slowness in communication, somewhat 'absent-minded' etc. He admitted to this himself when he said 'the hard drive was undamaged, but he had to re-install the software'. Of course, some of it may also be due to the booze & partying that we all partook in.

 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 10:17 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

David Shire, who, IMO, can kick the booty of "almost" everybody else named above!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 10:25 AM   
 By:   kirksworks   (Member)

I wrote an article about Malcolm Arnold's score for the 1956 version of 1984, which appeared in Music from the Movies magazine. Arnold saw it, asked if I had the soundtrack. All I had was audio clips of music from the film which included sound effects and dialogue. I had isolated the music as much as I could, and of course the fidelity wasn't that great, but really, it's all I had available to allow me to focus on the music and write the article. Arnold's agent at the time contacted me and wanted to know if I could send Malcolm a CD of what I had on 1984, which I did. I sent two copies. Arnold signed one and sent it back to me.

I think Arnold's music for 1984 is brilliant, if somewhat dated. He apparently was thinking of using some material from it for a new symphony. Don't know if it ever happened, probably not. Sorry to hear all that info about his abusive personality. He wrote so many gentle melodies, and had such mastery of the use of the flute, that ugly side of him is a lamentable surprise.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 10:28 AM   
 By:   jkannry   (Member)

Stu Phillips work on Galactica always made me wonder why he wasnt more tapped for big space operas?? His music was made for movies.

 
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