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 Posted:   Sep 19, 2013 - 8:56 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

But if you like scores with an unusual ethnic flavor, some beautiful melodies, bits of exciting action music, and even a little experimental atmosphere...try THE WHITE DAWN.

The scores you're describing are exactly the kind that I go for. So why is that one of my favorite composers has done one of these, but the sound samples leave me, um, cold?


Um...I don't know. Why did they leave you cold?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 19, 2013 - 9:04 PM   
 By:   Eugene Iemola   (Member)

This sounds like it will make for a great companion work to Mancini's NIGHTWING, which is also a recording with some damage, but very well worth the listen regardless. Looking forward to listening to the whole score!

Very much in the way he scored Hatari!. When you hear it you'll know what I mean. There's no baby walrus crawl in this.

 
 Posted:   Sep 19, 2013 - 10:13 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

I think the sound is pretty good, with plenty of body and crisp detail. Much, much better than I anticipated after reading the cautions. Very good release.

 
 Posted:   Sep 19, 2013 - 10:46 PM   
 By:   Josh Mitchell   (Member)

 
 Posted:   Sep 20, 2013 - 5:28 AM   
 By:   mark ford   (Member)

This sounds like it will make for a great companion work to Mancini's NIGHTWING, which is also a recording with some damage, but very well worth the listen regardless. Looking forward to listening to the whole score!

Very much in the way he scored Hatari!. When you hear it you'll know what I mean. There's no baby walrus crawl in this.


Eugene, I was picking up a Hatari vibe when I listened to the "Panic Run" clip. If there are others with it, then I'll have to wait until I get it in my anxious little hands!

 
 Posted:   Sep 20, 2013 - 5:06 PM   
 By:   Josh "Swashbuckler" Gizelt   (Member)

I received this yesterday.

The mono sound is fine. Yes, there's a little hiss, but I got used to it pretty quickly, and I'll gladly take a little tape hiss if the sound is clear, and it is very detailed, no matter how loud or soft the orchestra.

While the concert suite is built out of music from the film, it would be a mistake to think you know the score from the suite. The score has a very different overall feel, and the themes are fleshed out in some surprising ways. Variations on “Little Indian Boy” add a folk element to the score as well.

This is one of the best demonstrations that Mancini could do just anything, musically, and do it well.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 20, 2013 - 5:26 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)


Um...I don't know. Why did they leave you cold?


If I knew, I wouldn't have asked.

 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2013 - 6:25 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)


Um...I don't know. Why did they leave you cold?


If I knew, I wouldn't have asked.


Perhaps I misunderstood the thrust of your question, but it doesn't seem to make much sense to ask a question that comes across as "why is my taste in music such that I don't like these samples?"

Only you can answer that question...or not.

If Mancini is indeed one of your favorite composers and you like these types of scores, I'm certainly baffled. And I doubt anyone else on this board can help you either.

I don't think the samples are at fault. Although of lower mp3 quality, they seem fairly representative of the score to me.

 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2013 - 6:45 PM   
 By:   ajhfsm   (Member)


This is one of the best demonstrations that Mancini could do just anything, musically, and do it well.


He seems to be one of the great chameleon composers?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2013 - 7:47 AM   
 By:   counterpoint   (Member)

Like Nightwing not my cup of tea. I really like Mancini`s pop tunes but his dramatic music is mostly a bit boring. IMO of course. Just listened to Charade again. Sorry but the dramatic underscoring is rather conventional. But I am happy for all those who enjoy it.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2013 - 7:52 AM   
 By:   counterpoint   (Member)

Although I really like Santa Claus, Condorman and Wait until Dark.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2013 - 8:41 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)



From OnyaBirri:

The scores you're describing are exactly the kind that I go for. So why is that one of my favorite composers has done one of these, but the sound samples leave me, um, cold?

If I knew, I wouldn't have asked.



You're not alone. I feel the same way.
Perhaps, the people who love the score know the film very well?
I adore Mancini's inputs for Howard Hawks, Blake Edwards and Stanley Donen, by the way.
And "Days of Wine and Roses" is rather my kind of music.

 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2013 - 10:55 AM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

Perhaps, the people who love the score know the film very well?

Don't be so quick to write this score off as pure music. I've never seen the film, but I love this CD.

Honestly, why look for a logical explanation for why you're not responding to something? When you suggest that people who enjoy this are doing so for non-musical reasons, you not only suggest that the music itself is unworthy, but that there is music that is good and other music that is bad and that we should be able to come to a conclusion about which is which by following certain criteria.

As for me, I can't wait to listen to this one again.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2013 - 11:13 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Perhaps, the people who love the score know the film very well?

Don't be so quick to write this score off as pure music. I've never seen the film, but I love this CD.

Honestly, why look for a logical explanation for why you're not responding to something?


Why not?

 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2013 - 11:18 AM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

Why not?

I thought I had explained that.

 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2013 - 2:55 PM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

THE WHITE DAWN has to be Mancini's most intriguing score, and one that he was very proud of.

I vaguely remember seeing the film on TV several years ago, and it is definitely not your typical adventure yarn. It has a biting realism that leaves the viewer stunned at times. For that reason alone it was a not a hit with audiences, but it certainly resonated with Mancini, who was thrilled to be given the chance to score a film with no modern distractions.

The score opens with an arctic whale hunt, with conventionally orchestrated, full symphonic dramatic scoring -- that suddenly collapses and dissolves, as the protagonists find themselves in a bleak new world to which they must totally commit themselves or face extinction. Life for them has all new rules to which they must surrender and adapt. Mancini's music has to reflect the uncharted territory into which the audience is immersed, and he delivers an unconventional score (much as Goldsmith had six years earlier with "Planet of the Apes"). I like to think of this score as his "Hatari-of-the-North!"

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 6, 2013 - 12:54 PM   
 By:   cine50   (Member)

I've been waiting for this score since the film was first released in '74. Never thought it would come out. I was not disappointed. I am curious, though, as to why it was originally recorded in monaural. It seems like many scores since the mid-60s were routinely recorded in stereo (even if not mixed that way in the final film) with the anticipation of an OST release. Anybody have insights about that?

Also, I'd love to know what Mancini used to create the furiously screaming wind effect for cut 3 - Tricky Shaman Pt. I and II 3:09. Sounds a bit like a traditional wind machine, but with a great deal more range and nuance than that.

Ed G.

 
 Posted:   Oct 6, 2013 - 3:38 PM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

I've been waiting for this score since the film was first released in '74. Never thought it would come out. I was not disappointed. I am curious, though, as to why it was originally recorded in monaural. It seems like many scores since the mid-60s were routinely recorded in stereo (even if not mixed that way in the final film) with the anticipation of an OST release. Anybody have insights about that?

Ed G.


Lukas explained this in the TRUE GRIT thread:

"For whatever reason there are very few if any recordings of Paramount scores available from roughly 1965-1974. White Dawn and True Grit have been sourced from the mono tapes given to Mancini and Bernstein, respectively, to take home. That's the truth!"

 
 Posted:   Oct 6, 2013 - 3:49 PM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

Also, I'd love to know what Mancini used to create the furiously screaming wind effect for cut 3 - Tricky Shaman Pt. I and II 3:09. Sounds a bit like a traditional wind machine, but with a great deal more range and nuance than that.

Ed G.


It's a rubber ball scraped along the surface of a large gong, simulating the underwater song of a whale. The entire cue is spooky and surreal.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 9, 2013 - 6:25 AM   
 By:   cine50   (Member)

I've been waiting for this score since the film was first released in '74. Never thought it would come out. I was not disappointed. I am curious, though, as to why it was originally recorded in monaural. It seems like many scores since the mid-60s were routinely recorded in stereo (even if not mixed that way in the final film) with the anticipation of an OST release. Anybody have insights about that?

Ed G.


Lukas explained this in the TRUE GRIT thread:

"For whatever reason there are very few if any recordings of Paramount scores available from roughly 1965-1974. White Dawn and True Grit have been sourced from the mono tapes given to Mancini and Bernstein, respectively, to take home. That's the truth!"



One of the other few OSTs I have from Paramount is a vinyl recording of the late 60s film NO WAY TO TREAT A LADY; actually in stereo!

 
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