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 Posted:   Nov 16, 2013 - 7:41 AM   
 By:   John Morgan   (Member)

I agree. Ray was able to bring out certain instruments with a clarity that is much more musical and exciting than merely spreading out the center channel to the left and right channels for this CD release. The score was recorded, which was common in the period, on three separate tracks. The set up was never intended for a final “stereo” image, but used to have some flexibility in the final mono track by having the all strings on the left, and the other two tracks for separation of percussion, woodwinds, brass, harps, etc., This allowed the mixers to bring up or down certain instruments that may have got in the way of dialogue or maybe had a clash with sound effects.

The original recording is marvelous. The booklet tells us (I think) it was recorded at Disney, but it is so dynamic and full, my guess would have been Goldwyn. In any event, the film’s mixed track is rather flat sounding to me and with Ray’s mix and bringing out the instrumental clarity, it really elevates the music to another level. I have had a stereo copy of the music for years, and it never sounded so good.

The booklet has many behind the scenes photos from the Disney archives as well as in-studio memos that how highly the production people regarded the score. The booklet is marvelous. I highly recommend this for any Golden Ager. You really feel like your sitting there live, with the orchestra right in front of you.

 
 Posted:   Nov 16, 2013 - 5:42 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

I agree. Ray was able to bring out certain instruments with a clarity that is much more musical and exciting than merely spreading out the center channel to the left and right channels for this CD release. The score was recorded, which was common in the period, on three separate tracks. The set up was never intended for a final “stereo” image, but used to have some flexibility in the final mono track by having the all strings on the left, and the other two tracks for separation of percussion, woodwinds, brass, harps, etc., This allowed the mixers to bring up or down certain instruments that may have got in the way of dialogue or maybe had a clash with sound effects.

The original recording is marvelous. The booklet tells us (I think) it was recorded at Disney, but it is so dynamic and full, my guess would have been Goldwyn. In any event, the film’s mixed track is rather flat sounding to me and with Ray’s mix and bringing out the instrumental clarity, it really elevates the music to another level. I have had a stereo copy of the music for years, and it never sounded so good.

The booklet has many behind the scenes photos from the Disney archives as well as in-studio memos that how highly the production people regarded the score. The booklet is marvelous. I highly recommend this for any Golden Ager. You really feel like your sitting there live, with the orchestra right in front of you.





While you're here Mr. Morgan, can you give us any Tribute updates, either here or in a new thread?

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 16, 2013 - 8:33 PM   
 By:   Niall from Ireland   (Member)

Just wondering is there a Those Calloways fridge magnet going with this release?

 
 Posted:   Nov 17, 2013 - 3:55 AM   
 By:   John Morgan   (Member)


While you're here Mr. Morgan, can you give us any Tribute updates, either here or in a new thread?


We still have ideas and plans, but are taking a financial break at the moment. Doing rerecordings is just so expensive nowadays….even in Europe. When we started with Marco Polo in the early 90s, we could do a CD for $25,000 including all costs. Now it takes over $100,000 for the same, although musically and technically, I feel we are at the top of our game. Sadly, sales are not close to what they were in the 90s. Our last two releases were done with love, dedication and support from Screen Archives and Craig Spaulding and William Waybourn.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 17, 2013 - 1:16 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)


While you're here Mr. Morgan, can you give us any Tribute updates, either here or in a new thread?


We still have ideas and plans, but are taking a financial break at the moment. Doing rerecordings is just so expensive nowadays….even in Europe. When we started with Marco Polo in the early 90s, we could do a CD for $25,000 including all costs. Now it takes over $100,000 for the same, although musically and technically, I feel we are at the top of our game. Sadly, sales are not close to what they were in the 90s. Our last two releases were done with love, dedication and support from Screen Archives and Craig Spaulding and William Waybourn.




Thanks for the update John. I treasure all the cds you did right back to the Universal horror at the start. I often go back and play certain scores. It was so much fun looking forward to them.

You mentioned sales are down from the 90s. Are golden age fans fading away? I wish some of the younger fans were more enthusiastic about the amazing golden age film scores of the 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s.

Isn't there a record company around that would hire you, Bill & Anna like Marco Polo/Naxos did?

"We" are not getting any younger ...... you are ONLY two months younger that I am! smile

Here's hoping .......... one more time! ...... Peter smile

 
 Posted:   Nov 17, 2013 - 1:26 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

although musically and technically, I feel we are at the top of our game.

Understatement of the year. You guys ARE the Tops!

 
 Posted:   Nov 17, 2013 - 3:10 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

BTW- gotta love that artwork!

 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2013 - 10:03 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Finally shipped -- probably delayed by something else on the same SAE order!

 
 Posted:   Nov 21, 2013 - 10:20 AM   
 By:   Krakatoa   (Member)

For a collector who wants everything from beginning to end, it is so nice to have the last Max Steiner released film score "Those Calloways" on CD to bookend with "King Kong".

 
 Posted:   Nov 21, 2013 - 8:27 PM   
 By:   edwzoomom   (Member)



My copy arrived today and I am very impressed. I have the Intrada version as well but love this score enough to enjoy both releases. This new one has a very crisp, rich sound that makes it a wonderful addition to the other.

 
 Posted:   Nov 25, 2013 - 11:04 AM   
 By:   Anabel Boyer   (Member)

This score is wonderful but i have a few questions about this new edition:

  • how many copies do you think Intrada pressed/sold? 1000? Fewer than 1000?

  • If it was 1000 and considering how -- sadly -- poor golden age sales are nowadays, isn't it a financial risk to release this score again so shortly after the previous release?

    I hope you won't find my questions kind of a bitching attitude : it's a fantastic score and it should get the perpetual in-print status. Thank you for the people who missed the first edition.

  •  
     Posted:   Nov 25, 2013 - 1:51 PM   
     By:   Gary S.   (Member)

    This score is wonderful but i have a few questions about this new edition:

  • how many copies do you think Intrada pressed/sold? 1000? Fewer than 1000?

  • If it was 1000 and considering how -- sadly -- poor golden age sales are nowadays, isn't it a financial risk to release this score again so shortly after the previous release?

    I hope you won't find my questions kind of a bitching attitude : it's a fantastic score and it should get the perpetual in-print status. Thank you for the people who missed the first edition.


    Technically, this would be a Silver Age score by a Golden Age composer. smile I split the ages around 1960. As indicated above I will be double dipping. I love the Intrada release, but BYU/SAE need support for their releases. I am so glad I grabbed Wilson when it was generally available.

  •  
     Posted:   Nov 25, 2013 - 2:11 PM   
     By:   Anabel Boyer   (Member)

    Technically, this would be a Silver Age score by a Golden Age composer.

    Good point!

    but BYU/SAE need support for their releases. I am so glad I grabbed Wilson when it was generally available.

    Who knows? They may have released it again in a limited edition without telling anyone, as they've done with BROKEN ARROW. big grin

     
     Posted:   Nov 25, 2013 - 2:15 PM   
     By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

    Thank you for the people who missed the first edition.



    And also a thank you to BYU from people like me who had the first edition but now have a significantly better-sounding version.

     
     
     Posted:   Nov 25, 2013 - 2:23 PM   
     By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

    Wish they could do the same with a legit HELEN OF TROY....

    (Not that I'm obsessive or anything....)

     
     
     Posted:   Nov 25, 2013 - 9:07 PM   
     By:   PFK   (Member)

    This score is wonderful but i have a few questions about this new edition:

  • how many copies do you think Intrada pressed/sold? 1000? Fewer than 1000?

  • If it was 1000 and considering how -- sadly -- poor golden age sales are nowadays, isn't it a financial risk to release this score again so shortly after the previous release?

    I hope you won't find my questions kind of a bitching attitude : it's a fantastic score and it should get the perpetual in-print status. Thank you for the people who missed the first edition.




    "considering how -- sadly -- poor golden age sales are nowadays ....."

    Oh? Most of the Intrada and Kritzerland golden age cds either sold out or are close to selling out.

  •  
     Posted:   Dec 3, 2013 - 9:19 PM   
     By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

    I received it yesterday from SAE and played it today. Without going into much detail, I enjoyed it, and while it sometimes reminded me of Steiner's soundtracks for "Parrish" and "A Summer Place," that's fine, because I've always loved both of those. We find an unusually playful Steiner, which was refreshing. But am I the only one who kept hearing Charlie Chaplin's "Smile"? Steiner, more than once, comes up to the precipice, but then veers off without passing the point of no return. I'm glad I bought it.

     
     Posted:   Dec 4, 2013 - 4:34 AM   
     By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

    I received it yesterday from SAE and played it today. Without going into much detail, I enjoyed it, and while it sometimes reminded me of Steiner's soundtracks for "Parrish" and "A Summer Place," that's fine, because I've always loved both of those. We find an unusually playful Steiner, which was refreshing. But am I the only one who kept hearing Charlie Chaplin's "Smile"? Steiner, more than once, comes up to the precipice, but then veers off without passing the point of no return. I'm glad I bought it.

    Yes, the "Geese" theme is definitely reminiscent of "Smile", which I mentioned in my music notes.

     
     Posted:   Dec 4, 2013 - 8:03 AM   
     By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

    Thanks, Ray! (Re: Yes, the "Geese" theme is definitely reminiscent of "Smile", which I mentioned in my music notes. And almost the entire "Always Tomorrow." I need to read your notes!!!

    Follow-Up, several hours later. I've had a chance to read your excellent notes, and, yes, you certainly do make the point about Steiner's reference to Chaplin's "Smile." But it wasn't until I listened to "Those Calloways" through my tall chest-high Klipsch speakers that I not only heard that music as I SHOULD have listened to it (rather than with my iPod), but must say that I like it more each time I hear it. And hearing Steiner's playful reference to "When You Wish Upon A Star," I was glad to see that you cited that as well in your notes.

    As for "The editing is also more in line with Chelsea Rialto Studios' policy of sustained ambience (we don't drop to dead track for 3-4 seconds between cues) and fully chronological placement of all score and source cues." Great about the first -- oh how I hate it when an analog original suddenly drops to dead silence between the cues on a CD! But, unlike some here, I'm not such a stickler for "fully chronological placement of all score and source cues." I don't usually listen to a soundtrack and at the same time imagine the specific action that took place on screen that went along with it. Oh, I don't want it completely shuffled and start with the closing credits and end with the opening. No, not at all. But if something works better musically out of order, then that's fine with me. Over the years, going back to reel-to-reel and cassette, I was known among my friends for improving the listening experience with my creative rearrangement -- which I'm sure is utter heresy to many right here! Cheers!

     
     Posted:   Dec 4, 2013 - 3:26 PM   
     By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

    Well, I think with CD's, it's easy for folks to reprogram their playback. I respect the chronology because (a) it's a reflection of the dramatic sequence and (b) source cues - especially in golden age scores - are selected as much for musical reasons as for dramatic reasons by both the composer of the score and the musical director of the picture.. Frankly, I considered putting the Christmas present cue next to the "Oh Come All Ye Faithful" since they were culturally related. But once you start down that road... So I leave the reprogramming to the collector.

    A score like WILSON is a veritable cornucopia of original, interpolated and source musical elements. For me, the only way to fully appreciate Newman's monumental achievement is to listen to the progressive, chronological score. I'm sure there are some who programmed their own "pure Newman" suites.

    This is obviously an old-school outlook from an old-time, archaeological collector and preservationist (When I acquire a used film print, I always restore the mounting to as-printed status. Many collectors re-mount for convenience (fades, dramatic breaks), thereby altering the original theatrical reel assembly).

    Finally, since collectors have myriad feelings about chronology and source cues, the safest way to assemble is as-originally-presented.

     
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