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 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 4:39 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

I can't believe that folk would actually pass up getting a soundtrack they wanted if it wasn't on cd. I too always go for a cd if it's available but to actually choose not to have the music at all because it isn't on cd seems like the music can't be that important after all. Someone in a previous thread actually said they wouldn't buy the MALIFICENT soundtrack because there was a song at the end of the album!!! What a picky strange bunch we can be.



My sister recently spilled a soft drink on her laptop computer and ruined it. So, what happened to the music she had downloaded?

Please continue the real CDs guys!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 4:40 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Absolutely and definitely NO !!
Factory made original CDs only.




I agree with you two guys! smile


Same with me - long live the CD...:-)




Well, there's a half dozen of us! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 5:03 PM   
 By:   riotengine   (Member)

Absolutely and definitely NO !!
Factory made original CDs only.


I agree with you two guys! smile

Same with me - long live the CD...:-)


Well, there's a half dozen of us! smile


Same here. I would only buy the download if there was no physical CD. So, i will keep happily buying the physical CDs. smile

Greg Espinoza

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 5:04 PM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

I can't believe that folk would actually pass up getting a soundtrack they wanted if it wasn't on cd.

For ALL titles where download is free I would never pass.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 5:05 PM   
 By:   spook   (Member)

I can't believe that folk would actually pass up getting a soundtrack they wanted if it wasn't on cd. I too always go for a cd if it's available but to actually choose not to have the music at all because it isn't on cd seems like the music can't be that important after all. Someone in a previous thread actually said they wouldn't buy the MALIFICENT soundtrack because there was a song at the end of the album!!! What a picky strange bunch we can be.



My sister recently spilled a soft drink on her laptop computer and ruined it. So, what happened to the music she had downloaded?

Please continue the real CDs guys!


Yeah, my point is that if it was download or nothing I would always rather have something than nothing. After all it's meant to be about the actual music isn't it?

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 5:08 PM   
 By:   johnmullin   (Member)

My sister recently spilled a soft drink on her laptop computer and ruined it. So, what happened to the music she had downloaded?

My guess is that nearly all if it continued to exist on the cloud sites she downloaded it from, especially if she bought the music using the iTunes store or Amazon.com.

My second cousin's house burned down recently and all his CDs burned up with it. If only he had stored copies of all that music on his laptop, then he might still have it!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 5:11 PM   
 By:   cirithungol   (Member)

As long as the downloads were CD quality .flac files or some equivalent format, then absolutely yes.

In fact, I would prefer it. I have no interest in having shelves filled with ugly plastic cases clogging the place up.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 5:15 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

My sister recently spilled a soft drink on her laptop computer and ruined it. So, what happened to the music she had downloaded?

My guess is that nearly all if it continued to exist on the cloud sites she downloaded it from, especially if she bought the music using the iTunes store or Amazon.com.

My second cousin's house burned down recently and all his CDs burned up with it. If only he had stored copies of all that music on his laptop, then he might still have it!




You mean his laptop survived the fire?

This is all too complicated. I started with LP records back in the 1950s.
I've just accepted CDs! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 5:18 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

As long as the downloads were CD quality .flac files or some equivalent format, then absolutely yes.

In fact, I would prefer it. I have no interest in having shelves filled with ugly plastic cases clogging the place up.




You must live in a very small place! smile

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 5:31 PM   
 By:   johnmullin   (Member)

You mean his laptop survived the fire?

The laptop DID survive the fire, but both of them were carried off by a twister later that same day. This just goes to show that be it LP, CD, download or 24 track session masters, disaster can strike and deprive you of your music.




You must live in a very small place!


I know this wasn't directed at me, but I share this poster's lack of desire to have a lot of CDs around as well. My wife and I have a reasonably sized place (about 1600sqft), but we also have a 2 year old and another baby on the way. As most parents can attest, every inch of our place is valuable real estate now. Nearly all of my CDs are sitting in boxes in my closet, and frankly, I'm running out of space in there too. The idea of having ALL my music on a drive that's roughly the size of a pack of cigarettes instead of spread out over several shelves is hard to not want. Also, I can back all that music up quickly and take it around if I want to. CDs just seem like a waste of space to me.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 5:32 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

This is all too complicated. I started with LP records back in the 1950s.
I've just accepted CDs! smile


Ha!

Look, this conversation comes up about weekly here, and the people who wouldn't dream of giving up CDs can't begin to understand why others don't care about them, and vice versa.

The old hard-drive failure/lost computer/soda spilled in computer (okay, that's a new one) argument seems like a slam dunk to the CD crowd, but in fact hard drive based music is a lot easier to back up than CDs.

That said, I think we'll have to agree to disagree on this matter. While I still buy CDs by default, I have no affection whatsoever for the physical aspects of them. Go ahead, cite artwork, cite liner notes, cite whatever you want… the arguments don't move me. I like the music. How that music gets to my ears is unimportant to me.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 6:25 PM   
 By:   nerfTractor   (Member)

This is all too complicated. I started with LP records back in the 1950s.
I've just accepted CDs! smile


Ha!

Look, this conversation comes up about weekly here, and the people who wouldn't dream of giving up CDs can't begin to understand why others don't care about them, and vice versa.

The old hard-drive failure/lost computer/soda spilled in computer (okay, that's a new one) argument seems like a slam dunk to the CD crowd, but in fact hard drive based music is a lot easier to back up than CDs.

That said, I think we'll have to agree to disagree on this matter. While I still buy CDs by default, I have no affection whatsoever for the physical aspects of them. Go ahead, cite artwork, cite liner notes, cite whatever you want… the arguments don't move me. I like the music. How that music gets to my ears is unimportant to me.


SchiffyM is the calm voice of reason as usual, and I mostly agree. I digitize my CD's (losslessly) and retain the physical as backup because 1) I want the option to revert to physical media in the case of a catastrophe, 2) I may need to re-rip individual CD's or tracks, 3) the artwork and notes are a big part of the fun and 4) fair use restrictions. But the convenience of having my 4,000-CD collection at my finger tips instantly searchable and playable is incomparable.

So that's the background. Now, to answer the OP's question. I would absolutely transition to download only if three things occurred. First and foremost, CD quality (or better) sound files are a requirement for entry. Lossy downloads just don't cut it on a powerful high fidelity home system. Second, I look forward to a standard means of downloading all that precious artwork, liner notes, lyrics, and songwriter and performance credits. I do think someday before long the industry will solve this problem, as iTunes has taken some baby steps toward doing with iTunes LP. But it should be standard to be able to access the physical packaging materials in electronic form, and easily associate those assets with the music files themselves. It just makes sense, and I feel pretty confident that it will happen some day. The third necessity is recoverability, which is to say that, in case of a hard drive crash or equivalent on my local system, I can re-access my original download and simply restore the missing music and artwork. Admittedly, if you buy from many different sources, this could be a pain and so until further notice, there is just no substitute for good backups, both on- and off-premise. I have a network-attached RAID array that I back up to locally and my entire library (yes, 1.7TB) is backed up to the cloud via CrashPlan. It's about $40 a year and while a full backup or restore takes several weeks, it's worth it to have this last resort.

So that's it. If the industry were to standardize on high definition quality sound files, enable artwork, notes and credits to be associated and accessed electronically as well, and provide some recourse for disaster recovery, then I'd happily kiss goodbye to all the boxes and boxes of CD's that I currently have in storage.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 8:31 PM   
 By:   robertolopes   (Member)

I think I would only buy music as download releases ONLY if they offered lossless stellar quality files. I hate MP3s. When you compare MP3 to CD tracks in A/B fashion, there IS a difference in terms of sound quality. Try yourself at home with great audio gear or even using a good pair of headphones!

Yes, digital files are convenient, easy to store, no need for shipping fees, no need for shelf space, BUT... there's no jewel case, no "real" liner notes, no "real" booklet, no nothing... AAAND you still get inferior sounding files.

I love CDs. I will buy them 'till the day they die. I just hope that when we do go digital-dowload-only, we get to go in great style. There are way better options to do it nowadays than using those dreadful forever-lost-audio-information mp3 sh*t.

I hope you guys agree with me.

Cheers!

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 8:44 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

I retain my CD backups in what I was told are fireproof cases that each hold about 180 discs for a total of just around 300 CDs (the second one isn't full). In the case of a fire I can grab the two and my digital backup of my hard drive and get the hell out of there. I had to toss a lot of stuff that came with those CDs to get them to fit in the pack (only kept the CD and the front of the booklet) but it was worth it and I only care about the music not all that other stuff. The liner notes I care about are scanned and backed up. The rest I can do without.

I'm not surprised to hear so many people insisting on CDs though because I was big on collecting all sorts of things until I got rid of a bunch of extra stuff recently. It really frees you though to get rid of the physical things keeping you down. I just wish I could sell a few of the things that I think are worth trying to sell rather than just giving them away.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 9:36 PM   
 By:   jenkwombat   (Member)

No.

When the specialty labels stop making CDs, I stop buying soundtracks.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 9:55 PM   
 By:   tarasis   (Member)

In a shot. I don't give a damn about a physical object, particularly when I don't get them usually till 3-5 weeks after dispatch.

All I want is a digital copy of the music in lossless format and a PDF/epub version of the linear notes and I would be very happy.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 10:09 PM   
 By:   Josh Mitchell   (Member)

No.

When the specialty labels stop making CDs, I stop buying soundtracks.


Ditto. I already have enough CDs to keep me entertained for the rest of my days, but as long as they keep producing ones that I'm interested in, I'll keep buying.

Downloads? Never have, never will.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 11:25 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

No.

When the specialty labels stop making CDs, I stop buying soundtracks.


Ditto. I already have enough CDs to keep me entertained for the rest of my days, but as long as they keep producing ones that I'm interested in, I'll keep buying.

Downloads? Never have, never will.


Now it makes more sense why you freaked out so much when I explained how I cut up my booklets. I'm just glad I got over the physical obsession. Saves me so much space.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 12:51 AM   
 By:   Mr. Popular   (Member)

No.

When the specialty labels stop making CDs, I stop buying soundtracks.


Ditto. I already have enough CDs to keep me entertained for the rest of my days, but as long as they keep producing ones that I'm interested in, I'll keep buying.

Downloads? Never have, never will.


Now it makes more sense why you freaked out so much when I explained how I cut up my booklets. I'm just glad I got over the physical obsession. Saves me so much space.


What amazes me about these topics is this: The specialty labels very rarely GET digital so why worry about it.

If anything specialty labels may cut back on the amount of releases at some point, but for those who watch their bottom line, they can survive even if the CD becomes a niche collector format much like vinyl.

For new films, some labels still get digital but only from certain studios. Universal, Sony and Warner keep the majority of the big films or they license to the majors who will pay more for the rights to release them.

I have CDs and I have digital files in lossless saved on my hard drive and backed up in a secure cloud service. If the labels or studios offered me options to buy a release in lossless or hi-def, I am on it in a heartbeat.

But my professional opinion is this: If the labels control costs and watch what they release, they can survive and thrive. The CD will go on as long as people still want them. I don't buy into the idea physical is going away for good simply due to watching this vinyl resurgence.

Just the other day I saw an announcement via Billboard that Cassette Store Day is coming! CASSETTE STORE DAY?!?!?! Before we poo-poo that idea keep in mind many cassette titles got released on the last Record Store Day and sold out. Seems to me physical formats are like cockroaches...they will survive no matter what!

 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 1:03 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

Right now I prefer the specialty release on CD.

But if the labels could only offer downloads of their releases - hell, yes, of course I would still want to get those scores!

I probably would check out even more releases right now if there were a choice between ordering the CD or a (cheaper) download. I actually do that with pop music: I only buy CDs from my absolute favorite artists, and I choose downloads from artists that are hit and miss with me or completely new to me.

 
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