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 Posted:   Jan 6, 2009 - 11:34 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

I love these:

The Slender Thread
Deadly Affair
Mirage
The Pawnbroker
The Lost Man
The Adventurers



Many Quincy Jones score LPs are MIA on CD. They are:

Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice
Cactus Flower
Enter Laughing
For Love of Ivy
The Hot Rock
In Cold Blood
John and Mary (also has pop and classical selections)
The Lost Man
MacKenna's Gold
Mirage
Sanford and Son (theme only, I guess)
The Slender Thread

I don't believe that Quincy Jones had any involvement in the score for "The Adventurers", which was composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim. He did, however, arrange an LP by The Ray Brown Orchestra which had cover versions of some of the score tracks.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2009 - 12:18 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)


Wonder has Lukas ever tried to track down some of Quincy’s Scores or does Mr Jones have them locked up in his Vaults.

-----------------------------------------

Quincy Jones’ LPs are probably controlled by the record companies that originally released them rather then Jones himself:

Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (Bell)
Cactus Flower (Bell)
Enter Laughing (Liberty)
For Love of Ivy (ABC)
The Hot Rock (Prophecy)
In Cold Blood (Colgems)
John and Mary (A&M)
The Lost Man (Universal)
MacKenna's Gold (RCA)
Mirage (Mercury)
Sanford and Son (RCA)
The Slender Thread (Mercury)

As to the prospects for release, as near as I can tell, the Bell, Colgems, and RCA catalogs are owned by Sony. Liberty is owned by Capitol-EMI. ABC, A&M, Mercury and Universal Records are owned by the Universal Music Group. As to Prophecy, I just don’t know, but since it was distributed by Bell Records, I'm guessing that it's part of Sony.

A few FSM releases notwithstanding, Sony seems to have no interest in re-releasing old soundtrack LPs. Nor does Capitol-EMI (except for the Bond soundtracks). The best bet would seem to be UMG, where Intrada has been making inroads. Yesterday’s Intrada release of Bernstein’s “Gold” is from the ABC catalog.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2009 - 1:47 PM   
 By:   cushinglee   (Member)

I think getting those complete LPs on CD is a longshot, unless one of the specialty labels makes it a priority. I'd hope a nice edition of In Cold Blood would be in somebody's pipeline, but other than that I'd be happy with a comprehensive compilation, one more complete and better realized than the Reel Quincy Jones CD that came out a while back.

As to the appraisal question, I'm a big fan of the vintage scores, but he seemed to be coasting by the mid 70s and I always wondered if it had something to with his successive brain surgeries. While he's publicly lauded for Roots, he seemed to have dropped the ball with that project with Gerald Fried doing most of the heavy lifting. The Wiz was an adaptation (an admirable one even if the movie sucked) and Color Purple appeared to have been more commissioned by him than composed (the orchestral stuff anyway).

Did he really do any substantial composing after the surgeries?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2009 - 2:03 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)



I don't believe that Quincy Jones had any involvement in the score for "The Adventurers", which was composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim. He did, however, arrange an LP by The Ray Brown Orchestra which had cover versions of some of the score tracks.



I'll bet my last dollar that "The Ray Brown Orchestra" name was used for contractual reasons, as was very common on jazz records. That album is Quincy all the way.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2009 - 2:10 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

The Quincy does Mancini album was released on CD - in Japan. It's great and worth trying to find a copy of. I'd really love to have In Cold Blood and Mirage on CD.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2009 - 2:36 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)



I don't believe that Quincy Jones had any involvement in the score for "The Adventurers", which was composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim. He did, however, arrange an LP by The Ray Brown Orchestra which had cover versions of some of the score tracks.
Bob DiMucci

I'll bet my last dollar that "The Ray Brown Orchestra" name was used for contractual reasons, as was very common on jazz records. That album is Quincy all the way.
OnyaBirri



I'm not sure what you're saying here. Are you saying that Quincy Jones actually composed the score of "The Adventurers" rather than Antonio Carlos Jobim? That is, he composed the score that is heard on this LP:



Or are you saying that it's the Quincy Jones Orchestra rather than the Ray Brown Orchestra that is playing on this cover LP:



I suppose the latter is possible, if Quincy Jones was under contract to another label and couldn't contractually use his own orchestra's name. But then why would he be so prominently shown on the cover as the arranger? And why would Ray Brown, a prominent jazz bassist, allow his name to be used, when he was still quite active in his own right?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2009 - 3:01 PM   
 By:   vinylscrubber   (Member)

Actually, that ADVENTURERS Ray Brown album is probably much coveted mostly for a non-ADVENTURERS track called "Coming and Going", featuring the singular contributions of Sally Kellerman. (If you have the LP, you know what I'm talking about!)

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2009 - 3:06 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Actually, that ADVENTURERS Ray Brown album is probably much coveted mostly for a non-ADVENTURERS track called "Coming and Going", featuring the singular contributions of Sally Kellerman. (If you have the LP, you know what I'm talking about!)

A contributer to Soundtrack Collector describes the cut as "the most over the top orgasm psyche funk track ever!"

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2009 - 3:45 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)



I'm not sure what you're saying here. Are you saying that Quincy Jones actually composed the score of "The Adventurers" rather than Antonio Carlos Jobim?



No.


Or are you saying that it's the Quincy Jones Orchestra rather than the Ray Brown Orchestra that is playing on this cover LP...

...I suppose the latter is possible, if Quincy Jones was under contract to another label and couldn't contractually use his own orchestra's name. But then why would he be so prominently shown on the cover as the arranger? And why would Ray Brown, a prominent jazz bassist, allow his name to be used, when he was still quite active in his own right?


For the same reason that "Something Else" on Blue Note is Miles Davis album, but is credited to Cannonball Adderley for contractual reasons. Miles was on Columbia, and Cannonball was in his group. So, it came out under Cannonball's name.

There were very few working, functional jazz orchestras in the late 60s and early 70s. There were studio groups, however, made up of different combinations of a larger pool of players. Ray Brown played on a lot of Q's stuff. It must have been contractual. Google "The Ray Brown Orchestra" and all you get is references to "The Adventurers."

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2009 - 5:01 AM   
 By:   vinylscrubber   (Member)

Does anyone remember Jone's score for the 1968 unofficial remake of MIRAGE called JIGSAW? It starred Harry Guardino, Brad Dillman, and Hope Lange, with the then-hot Michael J. Pollard providing a typically spacey supporting performance.

It had a fairly "out there" abstract jazz main title and some good
Jones suspense licks, as I recall. I think this was originally produced for as a TV movie but was sent out as a theatrical release, jazzed up with a few frames of fashionable nudity.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2009 - 8:48 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)

Hay, thanks for the tip, Vee, re



it was noos to us! smile

Some Other Unheralded Opuses But Still Worth Checking (and Hearing) Out Department:

This is probably a little-known (and even lesser seen) effort from the early 70s that didn’t do much
for the reputation of either the stars or director Richard Brooks



yet still makes for some right pleasant listening if you’re in the mood for relaxing cues (and a coupla
stand-out orchestral sequences, as well).



O, und Bob, we’re glad you brought up



again as - amongst his more widely-known urban efforts (“In the Heat of the Night”, “They Call Me
Mister Tibbs” et al) - this one is notable for its main title sequence with the chorus of kids chanting
in the background of the Philadelphia scenery. It’s a very dark and moody piece (in keeping with the
storyline) but Meester Q manages to endow the proceedings with his own particular panache.



And since he was Mr. Poitier’s main composer of choice, has anyone ever caught a mid-70s flick
they collaborated on called



Jones' musical stamp is wistful, ethereal and quite captivating (aside from the fact it spotlights
the star playing the symbolic equivalent of something that’s the last durn thing we needed to seem him play:
an avenging angel high on personal payback rather the higher standard you might’ve assumed).



Still, it’s a peculiar ditty you might find intriquing if you can ever track it down cool

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2009 - 10:17 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Now it's time for us all to weigh in on the Quincy Jones/Billy Byers controversy. Who wishes to start?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2009 - 11:01 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)

On one condition: whatever said "controversy" is about ain't gonna result in the usual juvenile flame fiascos.

So enlighten us: what's the Jones-Byers flap all about embarrassment - and does it have anything to do with the preferred
topic under scope (film scores, remember)? ...

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2009 - 11:27 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Musicians and producers who were there at the time report that Byers did much, much more for Q's music than he was credited with. I have no further detail – I’m hoping to get some here.

I love the music either way, regardless of who made it happen.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2009 - 11:21 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)

We forgot to remember another aspect of



and that’s



collaboration with songster extraordinaire Matt Monro



If you wanna garner (not Jim) a listen, here y'are:





It shall be delivered onto thee smile

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2009 - 11:48 AM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

As a musician, he's the berries. As a petitioner to pres-elect Obama for a Secretary of the Arts, I think he's misguided. The LAST thing the government should become further involved in is the Arts!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2009 - 1:18 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)


O, und Bob, we’re glad you brought up



again as - amongst his more widely-known urban efforts (“In the Heat of the Night”, “They Call Me Mister Tibbs” et al) - this one is notable for its main title sequence with the chorus of kids chanting in the background of the Philadelphia scenery. It’s a very dark and moody piece (in keeping with the storyline) but Meester Q manages to endow the proceedings with his own particular panache.


------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2009 - 2:34 PM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)



HAPPY BIRTHDAY 2 U



- March 14th -
Department:







... smile

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2009 - 6:54 PM   
 By:   cushinglee   (Member)

OK, I'm an idiot. I'm trying to post a picture of myself with Q (celebrity whore that I am) and I can't embed it in one of these messages. What am I doing wrong?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2010 - 9:40 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)



Twas one of the biggest floparoos of the late sixties,



but it still boasts one of



Meester Q's more flavorful scores ...

 
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