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 Posted:   Jul 1, 2008 - 3:10 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Where the hell is Alex! I am not an enormous John Barry fan but if THE IPCRESS FILE isn't a perfect example of this I'll eat my hat.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2008 - 12:39 AM   
 By:   Philip Colston   (Member)

Note that, as I differentiated in my lists, “The Go-Between” is indeed quasi-Baroque, but without pop music elements (though the popular versions of the theme are in the pop mode—Baroque jazz melancholy, as you put it, Thor). One of the variations, which I think is in the Legrand box set, is in fact a proper fugue. Of all of Michel Legrand’s scores, “The Go-Between” most displays his remarkably high mastery of composition. It is also more harmonically inventive than most quasi-Baroque scores. (By the way, I can highly recommend Joseph Losey’s film “The Go-Between”, as a masterpiece of cinema, based on a masterpiece of English literature. The first score for the film, by Richard Rodney Bennett, was rejected; and apparently, despite the tantalising evidence of Bennett’s later “Lady Caroline Lamb”, it was not in the quasi-Baroque style. The “Lamb” score might in fact have been inspired, albeit possibly unconsciously, by “The Go-Between”.)

I noted that, earlier in this thread, forum member American Nightmare recommended Michael J. Lewis’ “Theatre of Blood”, which is most certainly in the quasi-Baroque form, with a unique and attractive sentimentality for a horror film score. Thinking of horror films, in turn, reminded me of the highly quasi-Baroque Vulnavia theme in “The Abominable Dr Phibes” and its sequel; though if I recall correctly, this theme as it appeared in the films was a replacement by John Gale, for an original theme by Basil Kirchin, the composer of the first film’s score.

I thought of what might be another early example of the quasi-Baroque style in films: the song “Amado Mio”, by Doris Fisher and Allan Roberts, in the great noir film “Gilda”, 1946, seems to me to fit in the category, at the more romantic end of the spectrum. However, this song did not form the basis of Hugo Friedhofer’s score.

It would be interesting and useful to attempt to compile a complete list of Baroque-styled music in film scores.

Thank you, Thor, for starting this splendid thread!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 5, 2008 - 10:36 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I'm listening to the Michel Legrand 4CD set I spoke of earlier, and CD 2 kicks off with an instrumental version of "The Windmills of Your Mind" with the main theme being performed on a harpschicord. Seems to me like it fits in with the sound I'm looking for.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 5, 2008 - 2:55 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

And indeed...now the "The Go-Between" theme is playing and it is indeed a wonderful example of a quasi-baroque/melancholic sound, although it's more classical in nature with no traces of jazz. Particularly love the segue into the fugue a couple of minutes in.

 
 Posted:   Jul 5, 2008 - 10:05 PM   
 By:   Philip Colston   (Member)

Yes, Thor, that is why I made a distinction between “quasi-Baroque” and “pop-quasi-Baroque”. The latter includes scores with pop or jazz elements. I like both kinds, though I realise that your topic referred specifically to the latter.

You would probably like some of the popular arrangements of “The Go-Between”, which have a jazz/pop sound and often include harpsichord (a beautiful instrument). These can be found on many Legrand compilation CDs. And you might like to hear the entire score, which is a suite of variations. Legrand’s own re-recording was issued on LP in 1979 and is now available on CD:

SICP 1562 Sony Music Japan, available from:

http://www.dustygroove.com/item.php?id=ks27p62m9z&ref=browse.php&refQ=incl_oos%3D1%26amp%3Bincl_cs%3D1%26amp%3Bkwfilter%3Dmichel%2Blegrand

However, in the 1990s, Legrand made an excellent new recording, which you might like more, because instead of two pianos as the solo instruments, he plays the harpsichord to Catherine Michel on harp. This makes the polyphonic lines far more clear. The CD is:

Musique et Cinema: Michel Legrand

Auvidis Travelling, K 1020

The CD is out of print, but can still be found—for example:

http://www.amazon.com/Music-Cinema-Suite-for-Harp/dp/B000027OUO/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1215319703&sr=1-2

Click “used & new”.

Also in the 1970s, accordionist Maurice Larcange recorded many Legrand tunes, including “The Go-Between”, “Summer of 42”, and “Windmills of your Mind”. They are much better than one might imagine! In fact, the recording of “The Go-Between” is of the film version of the theme, not the simplified, slowed-down pop version. You can imagine the dexterity required to play the allegro piano figuration on an accordion. I have only heard these recordings on LP, but was delighted to find just now that there is a CD combining two LPs (tunes of Legrand/tunes of Charles Aznavour):

http://www.amazon.com/Larcange-Plays-Legrand-Aznavour/dp/B0006840KM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1215319835&sr=1-1

I realise that this may not be what you are looking for, Thor, but thought I would mention it for other forum readers as well.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2008 - 2:42 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Thanks for the recommendations, Philip. Yeah, accordion sounds a bit strange for those kinds of tunes, but I've learnt never to be "pre-judiced" of any instruments unless proven guilty.

 
 Posted:   Aug 9, 2009 - 10:19 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The Man Who Haunted Himself (1970)

I like this music, by Michael J. Lewis as it sounds like it's in the pop-Baroque style.

And do dig that fun production logo for "Associated British Productions" 0:20-0:30 into this clip.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJq0qKZeQEA&feature=related

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 9, 2009 - 1:51 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

The Man Who Haunted Himself (1970)

I like this music, by Michael J. Lewis as it sounds like it's in the pop-Baroque style.?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>


It's a little too upbeat and fast to qualify as "melancholy", but yes, it's "pop baroque". Nice tune.

 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2009 - 6:53 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The Man Who Haunted Himself (1970)

I like this music, by Michael J. Lewis as it sounds like it's in the pop-Baroque style.

It's a little too upbeat and fast to qualify as "melancholy", but yes, it's "pop baroque". Nice tune.


I disagree with the notion that something must be a dirge to qualify. Ever hear the Beatles song "Eleanor Rigby? That's a fast little number that I find to be unrelenting in its melancholy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Q8vl8wFm7g&feature=rec-LGOUT-exp_stronger_r2-HM

As for "The Man Who Haunted Himself", it definitely has some kind of melancholy woven through it; it's there, I tell you! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2009 - 7:20 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

The Man Who Haunted Himself (1970)

I like this music, by Michael J. Lewis as it sounds like it's in the pop-Baroque style.

It's a little too upbeat and fast to qualify as "melancholy", but yes, it's "pop baroque". Nice tune.


I disagree with the notion that something must be a dirge to qualify. Ever hear the Beatles song "Eleanor Rigby? That's a fast little number that I find to be unrelenting in its melancholy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Q8vl8wFm7g&feature=rec-LGOUT-exp_stronger_r2-HM


Yeah, sure, but the melody itself is quite "dirge"-like. It's the string arrangements/pulse in the background that are rather upbeat. I'd love to hear this song in a slower, more drawn-out version. Perhaps one even exists?

 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2009 - 7:25 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The Man Who Haunted Himself (1970)

I like this music, by Michael J. Lewis as it sounds like it's in the pop-Baroque style.

It's a little too upbeat and fast to qualify as "melancholy", but yes, it's "pop baroque". Nice tune.


I disagree with the notion that something must be a dirge to qualify. Ever hear the Beatles song "Eleanor Rigby? That's a fast little number that I find to be unrelenting in its melancholy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Q8vl8wFm7g&feature=rec-LGOUT-exp_stronger_r2-HM


Yeah, sure, but the melody itself is quite "dirge"-like. It's the string arrangements/pulse in the background that are rather upbeat. I'd love to hear this song in a slower, more drawn-out version. Perhaps one even exists?


The upbeat string pulse you mention is the opposite of what's going on in "Man...Haunted"! That's the point I was trying to make--in reverse, I guess!

Don't know of a slowed-down Eleanor Rigby, but there should be at least one cover, it being the Beatles and all. Maybe Stu Philips' Hollyridge Strings did one.

 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2009 - 7:27 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I see that the "Haunted" clip got pulled... frown

 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2012 - 10:44 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I see that the "Haunted" clip got pulled... frown

And now it's back up. I know Thor doesn't agree about this being melancholy, but even he isn't perfect. wink



 
 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2012 - 11:19 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

I see that the "Haunted" clip got pulled... frown

And now it's back up. I know Thor doesn't agree about this being melancholy, but even he isn't perfect. wink



Never mind the music - look at all those old cars! Apart from Roger's Rover 3500 there was a Rover 2000, a Triumph Herald, a Morris Oxford (or Austin Cambridge), an Austin (or Morris) 1100, an MGB GT and all manner of other marvellous contemporary vehicles.

Crap brakes, of course, and nothing like the current amenities you can get in even a modest car, but even so - wow!

 
 Posted:   Sep 9, 2012 - 5:36 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Never mind the music - look at all those old cars!

The FSM board in a nutshell.

 
 Posted:   Sep 9, 2012 - 5:49 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

Thor,

I'd suggest BODY HEAT is a quintessential example of baroque melancholy jazz.

But I know you hate John Barry with a vengeance.

Cheers

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 9, 2012 - 6:45 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 9, 2012 - 6:58 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

Thor,

I'd suggest BODY HEAT is a quintessential example of baroque melancholy jazz.

But I know you hate John Barry with a vengeance.

Cheers


Not a 100% true, talking with Thor personally he does have a lot of affection for some of Barry's themes, I know he particularly loves the theme to BORN FREE. He may well enjoy the theme to Body Heat but I think we know he could never digest the whole album let alone a 2 CD set wink

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2012 - 8:27 AM   
 By:   Bill Finn   (Member)

I see that "The Thomas Crown Affair" has already been mentioned. The title theme "The Windmills Of Your Mind", has a very baroque set of sequences to it. But the entire score is somewhat similar as well. I love it. Windmills is very much part baroque and part modern jazz styling.

One very melancholy baroque score that has escaped attention here is John Barry's "The Whisperers". It may even include a harpsichord, but I've forgotten. It can be performed more as a jazz piece, but the soundtrack is kind of sparse in that direction.

Another, perhaps jazzier example is Joseph Liebman's music to "The Light Fantastic" (only available on vinyl) that includes a couple of baroque-sounding cues.

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2012 - 1:09 PM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

Can't believe no one has mentioned Jacques Loussier Plays Bach. Probably from the late 50s, but can't see since I'm working.  

Don Ellis shreds a passacaglia & fugue piece on Live in Monterey. I believe it was written by some professor. Non-film. 

Listen to Return to Forever Romantic Warrior. Chick Corea uses some sort of electric harpsichord. Same w the Opening 77 from RTF Live. Non-film. 


Nice Baroque progression write-up Philip. And good call on Spetches of Skain McC - that's (your) fellow Brit, Gil Evans. 

 
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