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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: Mutiny on the Bounty
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2010 - 4:35 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

Double post apparently.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2010 - 5:11 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

Why certainly--my pleasure. Of course we know you're only expressing your opinion; nevertheless there's a certainly bluntness, a certain incivility to failing to add that bit of assumed information. As it happens, you reassigned a personal favourite of mine to the end of a line populated by scores that, insofar as I'm familiar with them (and I would claim to be more familiar with their "type" than every individual note), I would not rate in my top 500; as a consequence I experienced a momentary irritation not ameliorated by the expected "in my opinion"--a phrase capable of cushioning the aggravation caused by even the grossest lapses of taste. It's a courtesy, you see, and like most courtesies slightly redundant but nevertheless greatly appreciated by all persons of civility and taste. Certainly by me.
Please take all that as my heartfelt and more-than-slightly-tongue-in-cheek opinion. smile


Thank you for that thorough if slightly florid (in my opinion smile) explanation. You manage to accuse me of "a gross lapse in taste" by hiding it in a prolixity of multi-syllabic platitudes, which is a good trick.


You do, I hope, recognise when someone is poking gentle fun at you, as well as when they're having fun with words with no particular malice. I was going to add, "With apologies to Jane Austen" but felt that might have sounded a bit puffed up. smile

Just for the exercise, I started to look at the posts before mine to see if anyone had unforgivably failed to pardon themselves when expressing an opinion, and it didn't take long to find this:

(ncidentally (sic), not that I want to turn the thread into loved it/hated it, but I could never take seriously any film that presented Clark Gable as an Englishman. There was never a more strictly American icon than Clark Gable, and he was wise not to even attempt an English accent).

Doesn't this opinion about Gable require qualification?


No, it's axiomatic. No one would dispute that Gable was a very American icon who was reluctant to attempt "foreign" accents in his films, at least in my memory. "In my opinion" he was an actor, like John Wayne or Kevin Kostner, say, of limited range and ability, but effective at being himself. To anticipate your mention of Brando, he was often more effective at being somebody else, at which times we could usually distinquish what he was actually saying, as in Mutiny and Julius Caesar.

After all, could John Wayne not have claimed this? Or Ernest Hemingway, Andy Warhol, Clint Eastwood and a dozen others? Or Marlon Brando, sticking to the theme of the thread! Or, some might say, Dick Van Dyke or Keanu Reeves, notwithstanding that they weren't wise enough to avoid assaying an English accent.... Each of these will have their promoters for the title, and may be dismayed by your bluntness in dismissing their views so unequivocally!

This seems like a lot of typing for little result. But...whatever amuses you. smile

I do take on board that some delicate souls may prefer the IMO qualification after every pronouncement, and will certainly remember this while simultaneously ignoring it when I feel so inclined!

I was aware of this fickleness as part of your nature, Mr. Darcy.

I was however interested in your comment about my list. You said:

As it happens, you reassigned a personal favourite of mine to the end of a line populated by scores that, insofar as I'm familiar with them (and I would claim to be more familiar with their "type" than every individual note), I would not rate in my top 500

I was unsure whether you're referring to Mutiny or King Kong as your personal favourite. Your context would suggest the former, but your words suggest the latter.


Not sure where King Kong enters the picture. I thought my words clearly referred to Mutiny.

Either way, I'm envious if Eye of the Devil and my other choices aren't in your top 500, because you must have some absolutely cracking scores in your collection that I haven't ever heard. All these FSM discs are amongst my very favourite scores. But then we've already established that I'm grossly lacking in taste.


I'm glad that's been conceded and needn't be discussed further. As for my collection, yes, it's full of cracking scores, not only "in my opinion" but as an indisputable fact, vastly beyond anything in yours. I'm sorry to have to tell you that, as it must be a crushing realization for you, but the truth must be faced. It's the natural result, of course, of my superior taste. smile

 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2010 - 5:13 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

In assessing the film it's necessary to get what slant is being adopted.


The Laughton/Gable picture is a high adventure story.

The Brando/Howard film is a sort of microcosmic allegory of the world. Fletcher Christian and Bligh are, frankly respectively cast as the sacrificial 'Christ' hero who 'descends' for the sake of his men, all full of a sort of aristocratic noblesse oblige, and a merciless Father of the Old Testament who won't bend the rules. That in itself will tend to make Howard a little more 2D.

The Gibson/Hopkins Bolt version is psychological ... two complex men are shadows one of the other, they envy each what the other has, whether a family or position, and when they reach 'the other side' round the Horn, it all gets laid bare. It's all parallel to their inner psychic make-ups.



There are three very valid subplots for three very different films. I don't compare them, because it's meaningless. The Kaper score is the best of the three ON A CERTAIN LEVEL, the epic. But the Vangelis is a brooding, lamenting score for an inner tragedy, maybe not so well crafted, but just as evocative.

It's intriguing (reading between lines and what's in reply quotes) that people who attack anyone who defy their opinions, are the very people who are most likely to defaecate on those of others. All three films have strengths and weaknesses. Imagine a 'Bounty' with Brando, Laughton, the 1960s MGM remake's production values and music, and the screenplay and historicity of Bolt, but maybe directed by Lean, who always wanted to do it.

If only.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2010 - 9:48 PM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

You do, I hope, recognise when someone is poking gentle fun at you, as well as when they're having fun with words with no particular malice. I was going to add, "With apologies to Jane Austen" but felt that might have sounded a bit puffed up. smile


Within a wide choice, I think this was my favourite paragraph.

TG

 
 Posted:   Dec 26, 2010 - 6:05 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

I got this set for Christmas and I was blown away.

Not by the things you'd expect: the glorious "sea-spectacle" music or the beautiful love theme.

For me it was how incredibly interesting Kaper's music was the more he ventured away from the usual tonal film music typically asked from a composer. Like his music for THEM!, the more violent and strange the sounds were, the more I was fascinated.

And it's still available!

 
 Posted:   Dec 27, 2010 - 4:28 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I got this set for Christmas and I was blown away.

Not by the things you'd expect: the glorious "sea-spectacle" music or the beautiful love theme.

For me it was how incredibly interesting Kaper's music was the more he ventured away from the usual tonal film music typically asked from a composer. Like his music for THEM!, the more violent and strange the sounds were, the more I was fascinated.

And it's still available!


It's a magnificent score with everything a film score lover could want: two complete score presentations and the album version for those who can't handle the "real deal", or wish to reminisce about how paltry said album release actually was.

I bought MoTB a year after its release and I'm grateful it didn't sell out because I would've lamented my missing out on this film score masterpiece something fierce.

So in the dimisnishing holiday spirit, I'm thankful for ignorant children and Hans Zimmer's hackery that Mutiny on the Bounty didn't sell out. big grin

 
 Posted:   Jan 23, 2012 - 4:17 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

Playing this album on a gloomy rainy day always brings a ray of tropical sunshine into my home.

Come with me to the islands,
Come my love, follow, follow me,
Under the lure of pure enchantment,
Love will unfold her golden mystery.
All night long I will hold you,
Till the stars slip into the sea,
I'll weave a crown of rainbows in your hair.
Many a moon I'll spend with thee,
Love is waiting; follow, follow me,
Love is waiting; follow, follow me.

 
 Posted:   Jun 25, 2013 - 1:48 PM   
 By:   orbital   (Member)

"Full size & uncut" rectangular cover for this stunning set I have recently been fortunate enough to get for regular (European) price via Chris' Soundtrack Corner (still available there):

700 x 600:
http://s7.directupload.net/images/131220/7hcakobg.jpg

1400 x 1200:
http://s14.directupload.net/images/131220/yqocdd2u.jpg

For iTunes or whatever you prefer. Couldn't find this elsewhere so here you go.

---

On a side note (and sorry if this already has been discussed) I can't help but marvel at the 1963 Oscar's nominees list for best score (in alphabetical order):

FREUD
LAWRENCE OF ARABIA
MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY
TARAS BULBA
TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

... are you kidding me?! big grin

 
 Posted:   Jun 25, 2013 - 2:25 PM   
 By:   JohnnyG   (Member)

"Full size & uncut" rectangular cover for this stunning set I have recently been fortunate enough to get for regular (European) price via Chris' Soundtrack Corner (still available there):

700 x 600:
http://www.fileden.com/files/2010/12/28/3046850/MOTBFSM700.jpg

1400 x 1200:
http://www.fileden.com/files/2010/12/28/3046850/MOTBFSM1400.jpg

For iTunes or whatever you prefer. Couldn't find this elsewhere so here you go.

---

On a side note (and sorry if this already has been discussed) I can't help but marvel about the 1963 Oscar's nominees list for best score (in alphabetical order):

FREUD
LAWRENCE OF ARABIA
MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY
TARAS BULBA
TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

... are you kidding me?! big grin




...and marvel even more about the year 1962 - scores that didn't manage to get a nomination include:

THE MIRACLE WORKER
LONELY ARE THE BRAVE
THE FOUR HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE
BIRDMAN OF ALCATRAZ
THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE
TENDER IS THE NIGHT
SODOM AND GOMORRAH
JULES AND JIM

and a few more of this caliber...!

"Those were the days, my friend..."

 
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