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 Posted:   May 20, 2013 - 4:20 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

At least Sudden Impact gave us "Go ahead, make my day", which was an instant classic. I remember it was quite popular in the schoolyards of 1983, though I think most of us only knew it from the trailer or TV spots.

Did he even say it in the movie? I remember him saying "C'mon, make my day!"


He says it at 3:20 in this clip. I think the variation you remember was towards the end of the movie when he's trying to save Sondra Locke's character.

 
 
 Posted:   May 20, 2013 - 12:29 PM   
 By:   musicwizard   (Member)


Now, this is from 1976, same year as THE ENFORCER, and is credited to Jay Chattaway and Maynard Ferguson as composers, performed by Ferguson and big band... Does it remind anyone of anything?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLLGkuljUVk


This is more than just a coincidence of course. Not only the riff is almost the same but also the build up and chord progressions. I believe it’s mr. Fielding here who is “borrowing” from Ferguson / Chattaway. I couldn’t find a release date of the “Primal Scream” Lp but the movie was released december 22, 1976 (recording sessions taking place in late october). Presuming the Lp was released much earlier that year than it’s impossible to say that Ferguson / Chattaway were inspired by the movie.

The other possibility is that Clint Eastwood (being a jazz admirer) temptracked the “Rooftop Chase” scene with this music (from his Lp collection?) and asked Fielding to write something similar.
Something almost identical happened a year later with “The Gauntlet” were Fielding for some reason paid tribute to Miles Davis and quoting his “Solea” from the “Sketches of Spain” album.
Coincidence?


 
 
 Posted:   May 20, 2013 - 1:26 PM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)


This is more than just a coincidence of course. Not only the riff is almost the same but also the build up and chord progressions. I believe it’s mr. Fielding here who is “borrowing” from Ferguson / Chattaway. I couldn’t find a release date of the “Primal Scream” Lp but the movie was released december 22, 1976 (recording sessions taking place in late october). Presuming the Lp was released much earlier that year than it’s impossible to say that Ferguson / Chattaway were inspired by the movie.





The Primal Scream album, according to the credits on my copy, was recorded between August and October 1975.

 
 
 Posted:   May 21, 2013 - 12:25 AM   
 By:   musicwizard   (Member)


The Primal Scream album, according to the credits on my copy, was recorded between August and October 1975.


Thanks Simon for the info. Does it also say where they recorded the album?
That confirms that Ferguson already composed / recorded his version before Fielding recorded any of his music for “The Enforer” (on october 27 & 29). Could be that Fielding (or Eastwood) attended the Ferguson / Chattaway sessions earlier (or got hold of a copy of it) but I find that hard to believe. Although Fielding worked with Ferguson back in the 50’s I don’t have any evidence they were very close friends. Both sessions also used different (combo) players so no one could have been familiar with the “Primal Scream” tracks at that time.
So it probably is a coincidence after all then or both men “borrowed” it from a third source!

 
 
 Posted:   May 21, 2013 - 2:43 AM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)



Thanks Simon for the info. Does it also say where they recorded the album?
That confirms that Ferguson already composed / recorded his version before Fielding recorded any of his music for “The Enforer” (on october 27 & 29). Could be that Fielding (or Eastwood) attended the Ferguson / Chattaway sessions earlier (or got hold of a copy of it) but I find that hard to believe.





Primal Scream was recorded by Joe Jorgensen at 'Media Sound, 311 W. 57th St, New York'.

I've had this album for years on vinyl but had never made the connection between it and The Enforcer!

Having had my attention drawn to it, I've been listening to it for the first time in many years and I've just ordered the CD, as I'm reminded how funky it is smile

I'm also inclined to think that this might well have 'inspired' Fielding, who has been known to do a bit of borrowing on occasion.

 
 
 Posted:   May 21, 2013 - 4:25 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Yes, I too am struck by the similarities between the Chattaway/ Ferguson piece and Fielding's "Rooftop Chase". I had previously posted the link on the Tommy Tedesco thread, where lexedo was waxing lyrical. I hope he gets back to us with his ideas - he's a wealth of jazzy info.

We can but speculate how this came about. Knowing how closely Fielding worked with his musicians, it's possible that Tedesco started jamming the recently-heard (?) Ferguson piece, just giving some ideas for Fielding to develop, Fielding picked up on it and thought "Yeah Tommy, let's go that direction". Or it may indeed have been temp-tracked that way (although Eastwood wasn't the director, it was his company).

I must admit that on the one hand, as I discover more music in general and make the connection between film scores and jazz/ classical whatever, I'm often intrigued enough to follow up the leads and, in this case, start really listening to Maynard Ferguson, and admiring how Fielding is mixed up in the stew. On the other hand, as I delve deeper into Fielding and strip away the layers, once you've chucked out the Lutoslawski, the Bartok, the Penderecki, the Chattaway (!) etc, I'm left with the feeling that I don't really know if Fielding was basically just a superb arranger more than anything else.

That last comment is sure to ruffle some feathers, but I say it as a (still) huge Fielding fan.

 
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