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 Posted:   Oct 23, 2012 - 6:10 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

The obvious exception is THE KING OF KINGS (1927), directed by C. B. DeMille and starring H. B. Warner. Perhaps there was less concern about silent depictions of Our Lord. (Most Anglo-American Chrsitians would not even have uttered the name "Jesus" in casual conversation in those days.) Cultural sensitivities change over time, obviously. In the USA there was initial concern about mounting a stage version of BEN-HUR in the 1890s: "The public will never accept God and a horse race in the same show." Theater, and later cinema, were still emerging from long-standing disrepute in the nineteenth century. There was a time when being an actress was regarded as akin to being a prostitute. Attitudes changed, but only gradually and variously in different regions.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2012 - 7:08 PM   
 By:   James Corry   (Member)

Thanks so much Doug for the info. I'm really sorry to hear that. The Odeon Sheffield was a magnificent huge house and seeing "Where Eagles Dare" in 70mm on such a huge screen (this was in 1972) was an experience I'll never forget. I'm sorry to hear that it's gone. And I'm sorry that young people today will (apparently) not have an opportunity to see these tremendous films in a proper venue. Seeing "Where Eagles Dare" on an iPod just doesn't QUITE compare with seeing it at the Odeon Sheffield......

J.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2012 - 10:34 PM   
 By:   philiperic   (Member)

There is also a 1935 French film directed by Julian Duvivier with music by Jacques Ibert called GOLGOTHA (aka BEHOLD THE MAN) in which Jesus is seen full face --- quite a good version .

 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2012 - 5:06 PM   
 By:   CH-CD   (Member)

This is for "CH-CD"....

Do you still live in Sheffield? If so, is the big Sheffield Odeon still there and open? I lived in Chesterfield for several months and used to go into Sheffield quite frequently....I first saw "Where Eagles Dare" at the Sheffield Odeon in 70mm; that was an experience I'll NEVER forget....!

J.



Hi, James........only just seen your post, but see that Doug has told you of the Odeon's fate.

The Odeon was my favourite cinema and was the home of most of the great 70mm Epics.

It was the first, specially built, post-war cinema to be built in Britain and opened on July 16th, 1956 with "Reach for the Sky", and closed on June 5th, 1971 with a re-issue double bill of "Carry on Up the Jungle/ Carry on Up the Khyber".

It had "state of the art" facilities in projection and sound, which, as far as i'm concerned were far superior to what we have today !

When Rank decided to twin The Gaumont in 1968, the two cinemas' roles were reversed, and Gaumont 1 took the 70mm Road Shows, and the Odeon got the weekly bread & butter stuff.

Eventually, Rank decided that it was too expensive to keep up three huge cinemas here, and the Odeon was closed down without any announcement.

It wasn't demolished though, and still flourishes today as Mecca Bingo.







The thing is, "Where Eagles Dare" was an MGM film, so, you didn't see it at the Odeon but at the A.B.C. Cinema !

This was my "other" favourite cinema and was really beautiful. Opening in May. 1961, it again had "state of the art" facilities. ABC eventually sold out to the Canon Group, and they in turn sold out to an asset stripper who closed it and sold off the land. It closed on July 28th, 1988 and was demolished in the August. An hotel stands there today.

"Where Eagles Dare"'s original 70mm Road Show run opened there on 18th May, 1969 and ran until July 5th. Do those dates ring any bells ?

What I wouldn't give to have those two wonderful theatres back, and the films to show in them, of course !









 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2012 - 5:24 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

The obvious exception is THE KING OF KINGS (1927), directed by C. B. DeMille and starring H. B. Warner. Perhaps there was less concern about silent depictions of Our Lord.




I think Doug meant that Ray's 1961 'King of Kings' was the first film allowed in BRITAIN to portray Christ's face.

In the sound era, we shouldn't forget Duvivier's 'Golgotha' in the '30s (scored by Ibert, excellently)




or :Coyle's 'Day of Triumph' in 1954:

http://vimeo.com/36826805

Actually, the reluctance to use the terms 'Jesus' or 'Christ' in favour of 'Our Lord' would have been largely a Catholic thing. The evangelicals and certainly the fundamentalists were never too shy about dropping names in the US back in DeMille's days.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2012 - 11:45 PM   
 By:   philiperic   (Member)

The obvious exception is THE KING OF KINGS (1927), directed by C. B. DeMille and starring H. B. Warner. Perhaps there was less concern about silent depictions of Our Lord.




I think Doug meant that Ray's 1961 'King of Kings' was the first film allowed in BRITAIN to portray Christ's face.

In the sound era, we shouldn't forget Duvivier's 'Golgotha' in the '30s (scored by Ibert, excellently)

I did mention GOLGOTHA several posts back...

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2012 - 6:18 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

So DeMille's film never played in the U.K.?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 31, 2012 - 2:18 PM   
 By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)

The obvious exception is THE KING OF KINGS (1927), directed by C. B. DeMille and starring H. B. Warner. Perhaps there was less concern about silent depictions of Our Lord. (Most Anglo-American Chrsitians would not even have uttered the name "Jesus" in casual conversation in those days.) Cultural sensitivities change over time, obviously. In the USA there was initial concern about mounting a stage version of BEN-HUR in the 1890s: "The public will never accept God and a horse race in the same show." Theater, and later cinema, were still emerging from long-standing disrepute in the nineteenth century. There was a time when being an actress was regarded as akin to being a prostitute. Attitudes changed, but only gradually and variously in different regions.

I've been reading "Picture Palace: A Social History of the Cinema" which mentions when the portrayal of Christ on screen first became a problem in the UK. It was the release of the USA made film FROM MANGER TO CROSS in 1912 portraying the life of Christ, which caused many protests within church establishments and led to the British Board of Film Censors, to prohibit representations of Christ on screen. I see that FROM MANGER TO SCREEN (as a double bill with the 1903 French film LIFE AND PASSION OF JESUS) is available on a region 1 DVD. I don't know how KING OF KINGS (1927) subsequently got away with it!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 4, 2012 - 5:39 AM   
 By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)

I've learnt some additional information about De Mille's 1927 KING OF KINGS. It was actually refused a certificate by the British Board of Film Censors but, as has always been the case, local authorities could overide the BBFC decisions and the film was passed for showing in London by the London Council authorities. I assume that some other local authorities passed it for showing in other parts of the country.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 5, 2012 - 11:38 AM   
 By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)

These are from the UK press campaign kit for THE BIG FISHERMAN. There's no mention of 70mm and the displays outside the Astoria, London appear to say just "Technicolor...Panavision".







 
 
 Posted:   May 5, 2013 - 12:32 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Turner Classic Movies has scheduled THE BIG FISHERMAN for airing on Thursday, May 16 @ 8:00 PM (ET). It does not appear as if the showing will be in widescreen.

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/68656/Big-Fisherman-The/articles.html

 
 
 Posted:   May 5, 2013 - 9:56 PM   
 By:   John Black   (Member)

It's probably the same full frame print that used to air on "Vault Disney." I haven't seen the film in at least 15 years, so I'll watch the TCM telecast.

 
 Posted:   May 5, 2013 - 10:12 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

Thanks for the heads-up, Bob!

I'll be taping. Can't wait to hear if Robert Osborne has anything to say about the print source, and whether there's any news as to possible restoration of the film.

 
 Posted:   May 6, 2013 - 11:55 AM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

Turner Classic Movies has scheduled THE BIG FISHERMAN for airing on Thursday, May 16 @ 8:00 PM (ET). It does not appear as if the showing will be in widescreen.

"Not widescreen" is still better than "no screen." In Canada this is blacked-out and being replaced by a repeat showing of KING OF KINGS (1961).

 
 
 Posted:   May 6, 2013 - 5:42 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

Turner Classic Movies has scheduled THE BIG FISHERMAN for airing on Thursday, May 16 @ 8:00 PM (ET). It does not appear as if the showing will be in widescreen.

"Not widescreen" is still better than "no screen." In Canada this is blacked-out and being replaced by a repeat showing of KING OF KINGS (1961).


They may have taken a look at it and thought better. Incidentally, "Fisherman" isn't the only turkey releaed in '59 under the guns of B-H; there's also the seldom-mentioned, rarely-seen Solomon & Sheba. I saw this when I was 15, as one of only three people in a very large cinema, which seems about right somehow.

 
 
 Posted:   May 7, 2013 - 8:44 AM   
 By:   Ed Lachmann   (Member)

Funny, I remember seeing SOLOMON AND SHEBA at a rather large theater in Chicago as a tyke where it played to a full house. No one, as I remember, had any complaints, especially during Gina's pagan fertility dance. Having seen it recently, I certainly find it a bit over the top in that 50's way but, all in all, quite a bit of colorful widescreen eye candy fun. I'd LOVE to see it on blu-ray if only the powers would see fit to release it. I wonder if in fifty odd years films like STAR WARS or THE MATRIX will be relegated to the "turkey" dump heap. They will almost certainly be more dated by then than King Vidor's maligned epic is today.

 
 
 Posted:   May 7, 2013 - 10:40 AM   
 By:   philiperic   (Member)

Funny, I remember seeing SOLOMON AND SHEBA at a rather large theater in Chicago as a tyke where it played to a full house. No one, as I remember, had any complaints, especially during Gina's pagan fertility dance. Having seen it recently, I certainly find it a bit over the top in that 50's way but, all in all, quite a bit of colorful widescreen eye candy fun. I'd LOVE to see it on blu-ray if only the powers would see fit to release it. I wonder if in fifty odd years films like STAR WARS or THE MATRIX will be relegated to the "turkey" dump heap. They will almost certainly be more dated by then than King Vidor's maligned epic is today.

I resurrected a SOLOMON AND SHEBA thread yesterday(in response to the negative remarks here) where I mentioned the very same thing -- I saw S+S at a downtown Chicago theater in its premiere engagment where it was close to a sell out - I believe that the box office returns made it a success financially. And it never looked better than on the big screen in Super Technirama 70!

I think that it might have worked better with Tyrone Power as Solomon if he had not died during production (you can find a clip from his perf on youtube - look for That's Hollywood - Tyrone Power). Still Ive always enjoyed the Brynner/Lollobrigida epic - a lavish swansong for King Vidor with an excellent score by Mario Nascimbene.

 
 
 Posted:   May 7, 2013 - 8:23 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

It apparently made it into Harry Medved's "The Fifty Worst Films of All Time (And How They Got That Way)". This is of course a ridiculous concept--there are not 50 worst or 50 best--but I sure have to agree with this particular selection.

Still, what do I know? I dislike the fondly remembered "Ten Commandments", and that's a hanging offence in some forums. I think "The Robe" is as boring as it gets (Demetrius and the Gladiators is far better). I could go on, but that should carry us through the next few posts. smile

 
 
 Posted:   May 7, 2013 - 11:27 PM   
 By:   philiperic   (Member)

It apparently made it into Harry Medved's "The Fifty Worst Films of All Time (And How They Got That Way)". This is of course a ridiculous concept--there are not 50 worst or 50 best--but I sure have to agree with this particular selection.

Still, what do I know? I dislike the fondly remembered "Ten Commandments", and that's a hanging offence in some forums. I think "The Robe" is as boring as it gets (Demetrius and the Gladiators is far better). I could go on, but that should carry us through the next few posts. smile


I have the Medved tome somewhere -- it is really is a bit of joke , as you say. One man's trash is another man's treasure -- I somewhat agree about THE ROBE -- it does have some boring sections and some less than stellar performances - but it looks so good now on BR and whata score! But DEMETRIUS ... is a lot more fun - another great score plus the lovely triplets - Susan Hayward, Anne Bancroft and Debra Paget !!

 
 
 Posted:   May 8, 2013 - 6:52 AM   
 By:   Joe Caps   (Member)


concerning Solomon and Sheba - how a film that is easily availablde on dvd can be called "rarely seen" is beyond me.

I think it's a perfectly terrible film, with odd, small looking sets, that look like sets.
Lollibridgida isn't even Susan Hayward-Demtrius fun camp. She's just bad.

 
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