Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Aug 19, 2012 - 10:05 AM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

Forgot to mention Broadway Melody, which gels nicely with the entries in my OP. You can hear a few different takes on the "Singin in the Rain" Rhino 2CD. I really like the song, Beautiful Girl, performed by the girls chorus, and Jimmie Johnson.

Scott Bradley definitely pays tribute to NYC music in a couple of different Tom and Jerry cartoons. Specifically, if you have the FSM 2CD set, tracks 3-4-5 on CD1 are relevant w/r/t the OP. On track 5, he is varying the theme from Broadway Melody in a clever way.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 19, 2012 - 12:12 PM   
 By:   eriknelson   (Member)

I would add Howard Hanson's Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 36. Very Gershwinesque. It's available on CD as Mercury 434 370-2.

Another more obscure CD that has this sort of music is, of all things, a 101 Strings recording called Piano Concertos and Rhapsodies. A couple pieces, Manhattan Rhapsody and Rhapsody d'Amour, especially fit your requirements. Unfortunately, the disc does not list who the composers are.

 
 Posted:   Aug 19, 2012 - 4:52 PM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

I would add Howard Hanson's Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 36. Very Gershwinesque. It's available on CD as Mercury 434 370-2.

Another more obscure CD that has this sort of music is, of all things, a 101 Strings recording called Piano Concertos and Rhapsodies. A couple pieces, Manhattan Rhapsody and Rhapsody d'Amour, especially fit your requirements. Unfortunately, the disc does not list who the composers are.


I'll check on the Hanson for sure. Thanks.

I have Manhattan Rhapsody on a Paul Whiteman collection. Those two titles Manderley posted are probably pretty fun - you can get the digi-versions from the links I posted.

Scott Bradley pt. 2: I listened to the FSM 2CD a few times today. So I turned on CN, and caught "Lover Boy" where Tom does the Louis Jourdan "Is You Is...," and that's classic. I also saw "Smart Cat," and it opens with the Gershwin clarinet glissando - very nice. FSM CD2 track 13 should be in the list I posted above.

 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2012 - 11:16 AM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

Maybe another titles to add to the NY WWII list is The Hucksters with Clarke Gable. I believe the music is by Lennie Hayton. I've only seen it once many years ago, but I had it in one of my lists.

I think the music in The Hucksters 1947 qualifies w/r/t my OP. It was on TCM last night. The main titles open w a skyline shot of NYC w the Empire State Building prominently in view. There are a couple of other places within the film whereby the NYC motifs and/or sound are prevalent (e.g., when Gable goes in the elevators; when Gable gets the flowers). The screen credits indicate that Lennie Hayton did the music. Nice. [edit]I wonder if that's a trumpet when Adolphe Menjou first speaks on the phone during Gable's interview.

I finally got through Night and the City, and both Frankel's and Waxman's scores are excellent. Frankel's score is a bit darker, but they are both excellent, and I am happy to have it. What a wonderful package too - really put together very well.

[edit]I am still workin on my LP conversion for Alex North's Four Girls In Town. I will report back on this recording as I finish the conversion process; couple of weeks maybe. The interesting thing about this music is that Alex North wrote it, Mancini orchestrated it, and Previn plays piano on it. Very nice. Here is a snippet from the old FMN regarding this record:


Henry Mancini: One of the most enjoyable things I did was a picture called "Four Girls In Town." Alex North was hired to do the music. He wrote a kind of concerto for orchestra and piano, and I orchestrated it. I used to go over to Alex's house and we would sit down for hours and figure out the orchestration. That was a big kick. Andre Previn played piano on that particular record.

Elmer Bernstein: Good company!

 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2012 - 11:40 AM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

This evening at the Rialto I'm running HALLELUJAH, I'M A BUM. Music by Richard Rodgers; MD by Alfred Newman. The entr'acte before the feature starts will be a 1937 recording of Rodgers' "Slaughter on Tenth Avenue".

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2012 - 2:11 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Has anyone brought up Leonard Rosenman's EDGE OF THE CITY.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2012 - 8:29 PM   
 By:   jkannry   (Member)

Those are good ones HL, no doubt. The Apartment is a good score. I was listening to Delerue's Pickup Artist, and there is a piece called Happiness that does very well at re-creating the very relaxed rhythmic approach used during that period. There's an acoustic guitar used to highlight the rhythm, and it is mixed a little high when compared to the old days, but it's still very excellent.


Manderley 10" Records:
Both of the described titles are on CD, but perhaps not legitimately. Here is the compilation that includes the Columbia MasterWorks title w Morton Gould and His Orchestra:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B003MX3JUK/ref=dp_olp_new?ie=UTF8&condition=new


The Decca record was issued as a CD, perhaps outside the US, on AMR 422. It is called "Louis Alter Album of Manhattan" by Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra. I couldn't find this one on any popular web sites, but here is the iTunes link:
http://itunes.apple.com/au/album/album-of-manhattan/id385989270


Can't purchase outside of Australia. Can find alter and white man but not together us iTunes

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2012 - 11:40 PM   
 By:   samloomis   (Member)

Hey lexedo,
A very 'bluesy' sounding NYC track is Bernstein's "Ballet at the Village Vortex" from "Wonderful Town" - along the same lines as "Slaughter on Tenth Avenue". It can be found on the highly recommended 'Leonard Bernstein's New York' album:

http://www.amazon.com/Leonard-Bernsteins-York-Dawn-Upshaw/dp/B000005J40/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1348381807&sr=1-1&keywords=leonard+bernstein%27s+new+york

There is also some footage of the music on Youtube, but the sound is not so hot, so you might find that a bit off-putting. I hope you find what you are looking for.



 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2012 - 9:23 AM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

Hey lexedo,
A very 'bluesy' sounding NYC track is Bernstein's "Ballet at the Village Vortex" from "Wonderful Town" - along the same lines as "Slaughter on Tenth Avenue". It can be found on the highly recommended 'Leonard Bernstein's New York' album:

http://www.amazon.com/Leonard-Bernsteins-York-Dawn-Upshaw/dp/B000005J40/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1348381807&sr=1-1&keywords=leonard+bernstein%27s+new+york

There is also some footage of the music on Youtube, but the sound is not so hot, so you might find that a bit off-putting. I hope you find what you are looking for.


Nice post buzz. That's the one w Stern conducting, & Dawn Upshaw, released by Nonesuch. I have this one, and it is a good record - very spirited. But thanks for reminding me bc I overlooked that recording when I did the OP.

Re Australia: I think I have to go down-under in late q4, so I'll grab it there if I can. I was really hoping to find that AMR CD tbh.

Re Rosenman Edge of the City: One of my favorite releases ever. I'm going to review this again to see if it fits bc LR was really his own voice.

 
 Posted:   Oct 15, 2012 - 3:31 PM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

Re: DavidInBerkeley // Alex North's Four Girls in Town

I mentioned in a prior post within this thread that I had begun to convert Alex North's Four Girls in Town from the old Varese LP to digital format. The conversion came out pretty nicely. Side B of the Varese record had the North music, and my Side B was defintely not in perfect condition. But it's the music that's important, right? Anyway, I would say my conversion of Side A (Skinner) was a strong "A-" fidelity-wise, and Side B a "B-" -- I tried my best folks. :-|

So, here is my abbreviated review of the North music: Wow!!! A completely amazing recording for sure, with Andre Previn on piano - and he plays extremely well too. In listening, it becomes immediately obvious that this music could only have been written by Alex North; the music has no boundaries, in a sense, given the period. It has honky-tonkin' piano and trumpet lines that recall Streetcar. It has Gershwin references. It has counterpoint that jazzers aren't usually capable of technically dealing with properly. It is really a very incredible piece of music, which was developed as a rhapsody based on the music from the film; it is supposed to be a very lively interpretation, and it is. And defintely very much in the spirit of NYC. But it is Alex North's NYC, and his love for America (as unique as that may have been) and her music, shines throughout. In other words, if it has NOLA or Gershwin influences, it is only bc Alex was brilliant enough to draw upon his own experiences and knowledge to exploit musically. Only Alex North, with his love, understanding, and appreciation of America, Jazz, and New York City could have created such music.


The Skinner music is very excellent also, but you can catch a current analysis of this in the thread for the new DCM release of Written on the Wind / Man of a Thousand Faces. The Written on the Wind theme is big in a golden age way, and Gershenson's and Co.'s take of Temptation is smokin-hot.


PS: Thanks DiB! That finale to the 3rd movement is really really something. Awesome.

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2012 - 12:06 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)



PS: Thanks DiB! That finale to the 3rd movement is really really something. Awesome.


Don'cha love them pounding xylophones?

And you're welcome. I'm glad my now-middle-aged memory counts for something, sometimes! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2012 - 1:50 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

For the record, "New York, New York" was written by Lionel Newman and Ken Darby, not Alfred, who of course conducted the 20th Century Fox Orchestra, not the MGM Orchestra, which was occasionally conducted on screen by John Green, which may account for that confusion.

(Deep exhale.)

Lots of wonderful information on this thread. FWIW, I'm reminded of a nifty LP Tony Thomas produced on Citadel which has never been put on CD, something like movie themes for saxophone -- full of noir stuff like CHINATOWN, FAREWELL MY LOVELY (okay those are both L.A., not NYC), etc. There are similar albums that ARE on CD, but their names and personnel escape me at the moment, sorry.

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2012 - 6:39 PM   
 By:   gsteven   (Member)

North's STAGE STRUCK, which I've often mentioned here, occasionally show up on Turner Classics. It features great mid-fifties Manhattan locations!

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2012 - 9:27 PM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

For the record, "New York, New York" was written by Lionel Newman and Ken Darby, not Alfred, who of course conducted the 20th Century Fox Orchestra, not the MGM Orchestra, which was occasionally conducted on screen by John Green, which may account for that confusion.

(Deep exhale.)

Lots of wonderful information on this thread. FWIW, I'm reminded of a nifty LP Tony Thomas produced on Citadel which has never been put on CD, something like movie themes for saxophone -- full of noir stuff like CHINATOWN, FAREWELL MY LOVELY (okay those are both L.A., not NYC), etc. There are similar albums that ARE on CD, but their names and personnel escape me at the moment, sorry.


Sorry if I messed up the NY NY info. I'll have to review the liner notes again. This thread has really been a learning experience (for me at least). I need to check that Stage Struck one too; thanks for that tip bc I really dig on Alex North.

I know Chinatown and Farewell very well. LA is an entity unto itself, and I would likely need to consider that seperately. (And in that respect, you get the smokey CT / Farewell sound from the 40s/50s, and the peppy 70s Tom Scott sound -- both excellent.) But, it would be impossible not to recognize the significance of the use of Manhattan Serenade for Tom Hagen's landing at LAX in the Godafther. It's the only thing I can hear when I see the palm trees on descent.

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2012 - 9:45 PM   
 By:   Wedge   (Member)

Depending on when you think the "Golden Age" ended, you might check out Laurence Rosenthal's REQUIEM FOR A HEAVYWEIGHT (1962) for a nice slice of New York, still available from Intrada along with A RAISIN IN THE SUN (1961).

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2012 - 2:42 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

This is more about the movie than the music, but STAGE STRUCK's location shots have been cited, and I'm reminded of Henry Fonda reminiscing about the production. Shooting of a scene in Central Park was interrupted by snowfall, and they were going to pack up and call it a day until Fonda suggested they do what Jack Ford would have done, and so they shot the scene as is, bad weather and all.

 
 Posted:   Oct 21, 2012 - 3:44 PM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

Been sick w a fever, congestion & a sore throat since Friday, so I've been watching alot of TCM. 

Anyway, I watched Onionhead (1958) w Andy Griffith & Walter Matthau this afternoon. The credits said David Buttolph adapted the music, and it was conducted by Ray Heindorf. I suppose Mr. B. got an adaptation credit bc there are a few old navy songs used. The movie is about a guy that goes into the Coast Guard, and becomes a cook. There are some nice NYC flavored cues used, too. One Is used when an attractive lady walks by AG, and we hear the typical bluesy-jazz vamp, much the way golden-age cartoons would use it to indicate the presence of a hottie. The other spots w NYC flavor include bar scenes from Boston whereby the music heard is actually source, and very tasty Buttolph-swing at that. Basically, anywhere w source, Buttolph does the period-specific magic. 

After that was over, I saw the trailer for Without Love (1945), w Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn, & that music seemed to have the "NY Sound." This makes senses to me bc it was written by the same person that did Philadelphia Story.

 
 Posted:   Nov 8, 2012 - 8:05 PM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

Just another update on some of the recordings discussed since I finally have power again. (Yay.)


I listened to the Stanley Black Broadway Magic CD, which is a Polygram / Rebound Records 1994 reissue of 2 previously available 1966 Decca Phase-4 Stereo LPs (viz., Broadway Spectacular SP44071, Broadway Blockbusters SP44088). Great, bright sound, and their takes of Slaughter on 10th Ave & Lawd I'm On My Way are very excellent. If you are into the late golden age / early silver age Broadway sound, you will like this CD alot, and the fidelity is great. If you have this disc, I made a nice PDF of the old LP covers, and some other iPod graphics, so if you want them, drop me a note w the same FSM id on aol. 

The other CD was a needle-drop reissue of Morton Gould's Manhattan Moods 1950. This was previously issued as a 10" Columbia MasterWorks (ML2144) title. The CD also contains Gordon Jenkins' View From The Manhattan Tower 1956, previously issued as Capitol LP T766. Manhattan Moods was the record that Manderley mentioned, and it is cool. This is more like what Paul Whiteman's band would do, but from a 1950s perspective. Manhattan Serenade has a more lively Gershwin-like arrangement, as opposed to the more west-coast laid-back Tommy Dorsey take some are familiar with. Nocturne is very good. Street Scene and Park Ave Fantasy are done well, and kind of reminded me that, in a way, they were like big-band standards back then, which is cool bc they were both from films. Manhattan Moods has some fidelity issues w pretty heavy "ticks" lasting about 10 seconds twice during Street Scene, and about 15 seconds once during Manhattan Moonlight. Definitely very audible, but no worries. The Gordon Jenkins' View From The Manhattan Tower is a fun recording; it's like a mini On The Town. There was one very catchy number, New York's My Home. There were two short fade-outs in the GJ portion of the CD, maybe t11 & t16, but not a problem at all. Definitely a good CD to have for my little project.   


Manderley suggested records representing Gershwin-inspired musical perspectives of NYC that maintain unique identity through their respective band-leaders. Nice. 


Now, I'm trying to track down the other Manderley LP by Louis Alter, a decent recording of the Steiner piece from Four Wives, and a DVD of Delicious 1931. I'll get back to ya...

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 25, 2012 - 3:48 PM   
 By:   Angelillo   (Member)

Lexedo, since you liked on my previous post the way Shaiman has captured that 50s NYC sound, and since I'm just giving a spin to these classy and top-notch Broughton's both ELOISE scores, I thought you may also enjoy that beautiful "spring" at this approx. at 01'10 ! wink

Two wonderful scores, but the most gershwinesque (if not 100%, though) is undoubtedly ELOISE AT THE PLAZA. I hope you grabbed these when they got released.

 
 Posted:   Nov 25, 2012 - 4:08 PM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

What's up Ang. What CD is Shaiman piece on? I saw it on a compilation, but wanted to ask you buddy.

I like Bruce Broughton, and I always wondered about Eloise. Now I know... It's excellent. When I hear new Broughton, i like him even more. Thanks Ang.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.