Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2013 - 2:37 PM   
 By:   SoundScope   (Member)

When I first found out this was going to be available, I almost . . . well, something stupid anyway... I WAS VERY EXCITED to say the least.
Ordered it right away, and i arrived today. So nice to finally hear it up front and proper without the dialog. Sounds great and it sound like Cordell. A very welcom addition to my collection.
I have always liked the choral bits, so this is just icing on an already appreciative cake lover!
smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2013 - 12:52 PM   
 By:   Bob Bryden   (Member)

I have just finished listening to the 70 minute plus original tracks from 'Cromwell'. This score is magnificent. How incredible to have a vintage epic score like this so late-in-the-day, as it were.
I saw the film upon release at a Cinerama theatre in Toronto (the Odeon-Carlton). I recall that I was very annoyed only by Cordell's use of extremely over-the-top 'stings'. At least three times in the film, someone says something VERY dramatic and the entire orchestra screams 'ta-da'. Having said that, I loved Cordell's themes and the orchestration. This CD, divorced from the film, is just brilliant, every note. The sound quality is vintage-Capitol astounding. Shiny release. Thanks so much, Intrada people.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2013 - 3:54 AM   
 By:   roadshowfan   (Member)

I have just finished listening to the 70 minute plus original tracks from 'Cromwell'. This score is magnificent. How incredible to have a vintage epic score like this so late-in-the-day, as it were.
I saw the film upon release at a Cinerama theatre in Toronto (the Odeon-Carlton). I recall that I was very annoyed only by Cordell's use of extremely over-the-top 'stings'. At least three times in the film, someone says something VERY dramatic and the entire orchestra screams 'ta-da'. Having said that, I loved Cordell's themes and the orchestration. This CD, divorced from the film, is just brilliant, every note. The sound quality is vintage-Capitol astounding. Shiny release. Thanks so much, Intrada people.


I can only echo the above sentiments! This is a very welcome release and the stereo sound is wonderfully crisp and immediate. Great notes too, which go into a lot of detail and answer my earlier query about the Overture and Entr'acte (which I now learn were recorded as one piece and then split into two sections!).

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2013 - 9:01 AM   
 By:   skyross   (Member)

I listened to both CDs today in full.

The score on the first CD is fantastic and makes for a very good listen. What a shame there aren't more Frank Cordell scores available.

I enjoyed the 2nd CD with the Dialogue and music and I do have the film on DVD.

Great Stereo Sound Quality on both discs.

 
 Posted:   Apr 17, 2013 - 3:23 PM   
 By:   Gary S.   (Member)

Finally got around to listening to disc 1 of this release. What a grand epic score it is. smile

 
 Posted:   Apr 17, 2013 - 4:36 PM   
 By:   edwzoomom   (Member)

probably not an indicator, but I hope more Cordell is forthcoming (God Told Me To, Ring of Bright Water)

Oh I do hope so. I picked up the Khartoum/Ring of Bright Water lp from Alibris way back and love love love Ring of Bright Water, score and movie. I have Khartoum/Mosquito Squadron cd but really want Ring of Bright Water. We can dream yes?

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 17, 2013 - 5:43 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

probably not an indicator, but I hope more Cordell is forthcoming (God Told Me To, Ring of Bright Water)

Oh I do hope so. I picked up the Khartoum/Ring of Bright Water lp from Alibris way back and love love love Ring of Bright Water, score and movie. I have Khartoum/Mosquito Squadron cd but really want Ring of Bright Water. We can dream yes?


I was lucky to get the Artemis cd release (I guess a transfer of that LP). Of the scores I've heard (Khartoum, Mosquito, Flight from Ashiya), I'm really just a fan of "Ring of Bright Water" and "God Told Me To."

There's an earlier fan discussion thread:
http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=82996&forumID=1&archive=0

 
 Posted:   Apr 17, 2013 - 7:16 PM   
 By:   edwzoomom   (Member)

probably not an indicator, but I hope more Cordell is forthcoming (God Told Me To, Ring of Bright Water)

Oh I do hope so. I picked up the Khartoum/Ring of Bright Water lp from Alibris way back and love love love Ring of Bright Water, score and movie. I have Khartoum/Mosquito Squadron cd but really want Ring of Bright Water. We can dream yes?


I was lucky to get the Artemis cd release (I guess a transfer of that LP). Of the scores I've heard (Khartoum, Mosquito, Flight from Ashiya), I'm really just a fan of "Ring of Bright Water" and "God Told Me To."

There's an earlier fan discussion thread:
http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=82996&forumID=1&archive=0


Ring of Bright Water is my favorite too. I appreciate the link - thank you.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 20, 2013 - 10:46 AM   
 By:   kcKEN   (Member)

Hearing all of the original tracks to CROMWELL has been one of the more pleasant surprises I have had of late. Always liked the film and the music, but never thought we would ever get anything other than the old LP. Great music and excellent sound quality. Any fan of the big films of the 60's and 70's should grab this one.

 
 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 7:43 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Finally caught up with this movie, after a mere forty-three years! It's a failure, as almost everybody seems to agree. Still, it offers the particular fascination of all grand historical re-creations. It sent me to the library, where I just spent the weekend reading up on an interesting period of which I knew little. (I suppose it's different for our English friends.)

The score, I'm afraid, did not impress. The use of choral psalm settings (presumably relevant to the period?) was an interesting touch, though the DVD version that I heard placed the voices too far beneath the orchestra for the text to have much effect. The dramatic scoring struck me as heavy-handed, intrusive, underdeveloped, and uncertainly divided between modernistic devices and period suggestion. I don't generally like to run down other people's enthusiasms, and I do so here only in the hope of eliciting some potentially informative commentary.

By a total coincidence, this blogger posted a thoughtful piece on the film as if in anticipation of my viewing: http://thisislandrod.blogspot.com/2013/04/cromwell-1970.html Amazing what you can find on the Web these days. Nothing about the music, though.

 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 8:20 AM   
 By:   ajhfsm   (Member)

Best listen to the Intrada set. It is much better for the imagination. A stand out work for me.

 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 11:16 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

Finally caught up with this movie, after a mere forty-three years! The score, I'm afraid, did not impress. The use of choral psalm settings (presumably relevant to the period?) was an interesting touch, though the DVD version that I heard placed the voices too far beneath the orchestra for the text to have much effect. The dramatic scoring struck me as heavy-handed, intrusive, underdeveloped, and uncertainly divided between modernistic devices and period suggestion. I don't generally like to run down other people's enthusiasms, and I do so here only in the hope of eliciting some potentially informative commentary.

Maltin's Movie Guide has always called the score "amateurish," and gives the movie just two stars and calls it "turgid" with no "human feeling underneath" and Richard Harris is "coldly unsympathetic."

I like the movie (have it on DVD but haven't bought the score yet), but it should have had a better director than Ken Hughes. He's the problem. No style. Same thing that's wrong with CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG. Indifferent direction.

 
 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 11:35 AM   
 By:   Dennis Brain   (Member)

I like both score and film. The score is one of Cordells best achievements. I like both versions with and without dialogue. The score is magnificent and in no way "amateurish".

 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 11:47 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

I propose those for the score be categorised as Roundhead and those against it, Cavalier.
That would make me something of a Roundhead.

 
 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 1:32 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Maltin's Movie Guide has always called the score "amateurish,"

Wow, that's harsh! Maltin's capsule reviews rarely mention the music, and when they do, it's usually to offer deserved praise for a score. But I see what he means. The picture is full urgent, agitated "stings" that don't go anywhere. When the composer intrudes into a scene in that fashion, he needs to have something worth saying. Too often here that is not the case. Is it possible that the editing made mincemeat of the music? Such things are known to happen.

 
 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 7:19 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

By a total coincidence, this blogger posted a thoughtful piece on the film as if in anticipation of my viewing: http://thisislandrod.blogspot.com/2013/04/cromwell-1970.html Amazing what you can find on the Web these days. Nothing about the music, though.

Interesting piece, which nevertheless over-analyses and over-verbalises a film which almost certainly doesn't deserve such attention, unless attention-worthiness can be gauged by dollars spent. I enjoyed it, but made the error of perusing a few other reviews on this site and came across one of the most indigestible sentences ever posted on a blog (this from "Dredd"--2012):

"The original creation crossbred a kind of guilty, semi-ironic fetishisation of a specifically American brand of fascist righteousness, as perceived through a fantasy extreme by a British sensibility, and placed it in a milieu informed by British council estate angst and Winter of Discontent-esque crumbling services, adding up to a proto-cyberpunk sensibility that delighted in a grimy, gritty future malformed by human endeavour rather than liberated."

It's comprehensible, yes, if you pick through the pieces one at a time and carefully reassemble, but to my way of thinking exemplifies the worst of the "let's dazzle 'em with the greatest display of extraneous verbiage and scattershot references ever" school of blogging. These people are certainly intelligent, and the depth and breadth of their education can hardly be questioned, but to a degree that's their downfall: they can't help parading it before the bedazzled public at the expense of general readability.

Sorry, all this is entirely irrelevant to Cromwell. I was just astonished at this unabashed display of egotism and wondered what others thought.

 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 9:29 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)


"The original creation crossbred a kind of guilty, semi-ironic fetishisation of a specifically American brand of fascist righteousness, as perceived through a fantasy extreme by a British sensibility, and placed it in a milieu informed by British council estate angst and Winter of Discontent-esque crumbling services, adding up to a proto-cyberpunk sensibility that delighted in a grimy, gritty future malformed by human endeavour rather than liberated."





Writing styles don't get much more Kirgo-esque than that.

 
 Posted:   May 28, 2013 - 6:32 AM   
 By:   ajhfsm   (Member)

 
 
 Posted:   May 28, 2013 - 8:43 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Bad prose to be sure. Since it will take me more than forty-three years to get to a movie based on a comic book, I don't really care to wade through the commentary. But the CROMWELL piece is rather good. There's another blogger, known as The Self-Styled Siren, who is an exquisitely talented writer. In a just world she would be published -- and compensated -- through traditional print channels. Anyway, I see no reason to question people for spending time on forgotten and largely unworthy movies. Isn't that what we do here all the time? But few of us comment as extensively or skillfully as that Rod fellow. I marvel at the scale as well as the timing of that particular post.

 
 Posted:   May 28, 2013 - 11:52 AM   
 By:   JohnnyG   (Member)


"The original creation crossbred a kind of guilty, semi-ironic fetishisation of a specifically American brand of fascist righteousness, as perceived through a fantasy extreme by a British sensibility, and placed it in a milieu informed by British council estate angst and Winter of Discontent-esque crumbling services, adding up to a proto-cyberpunk sensibility that delighted in a grimy, gritty future malformed by human endeavour rather than liberated."





Writing styles don't get much more Kirgo-esque than that.



big grin

I needed a good laugh - thanks, Basil!...

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.