Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   May 25, 2013 - 6:26 AM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

All Star Wars prequels suck big time, specially "Sith" which is just atrocious at all levels.

But the scores... are just great.

YOR's favorite is "Phanton Menace".

 
 
 Posted:   May 25, 2013 - 12:47 PM   
 By:   jenkwombat   (Member)

Both the movie Sith and the score are great.


Well, Judy, there are two of us out here.

The crickets are kind of deafening, though....

 
 
 Posted:   May 25, 2013 - 1:43 PM   
 By:   trstnvnk   (Member)

Carter Burwell didn't like The Jackal and after his score was remixed by someone else even considered taking his name of the film

 
 
 Posted:   May 25, 2013 - 2:56 PM   
 By:   captain_avis   (Member)

Jerry Goldsmith said that he was totally bored with "Outland." He just couldn't connect emotionally with it.

Interesting... that's one of the few well regarded Goldsmith sci-fi scores I can't get into. I can't connect emotionally with the score. Same goes for the Salamander which reminds me an awful lot of Outland for some reason.

Chris.

 
 Posted:   May 25, 2013 - 2:57 PM   
 By:   Trent B.   (Member)

While Goldsmith may have hated scoring The Mummy he did a kick ass job with it! I love his score for that film.

Has anyone realized that part of his theme for The Mummy sounds very close to the Black Ship theme from the Star Trek TOS episode "Mirror, Mirror"?

 
 Posted:   May 25, 2013 - 3:03 PM   
 By:   Miles (MerM)   (Member)

What does that have to do with the topic of this thread?

 
 Posted:   May 25, 2013 - 3:05 PM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

Yes, YOR remeber seeing Goldsmith saying nasty things about "Outland".

YOR got really sad, since he just LOVES both movie and score...

 
 Posted:   May 25, 2013 - 5:49 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

Just saw this amusing paragraph in Mr. Kraft's tribute to Elmer:

The final straw in Elmer’s comedy career arrived with the Bill Cosby comedy disaster, LEONARD PART 6—a film so bad Elmer refused to step into the control booth to talk to the director. The filmmaker eventually tiptoed out to Elmer to say, “I have a few comments.” “That’s nice,” Elmer replied, as he stepped outside the soundstage and drove off in his sports car.

www.kraft-engel.com/tributes/elmer-bernstein/

 
 
 Posted:   May 25, 2013 - 5:59 PM   
 By:   zooba   (Member)

Not really hating it, I seem to remember hearing an interview with Goldsmith talking about how boring the current project he was working on was.

It was DAMIEN OMEN II

For being bored he sure gave us, what I think is a great "Kiss Ass" score perhaps even better than his Original OMEN score in my opinion. Nonetheless I think they are both superb! And then THE FINAL CONFLICT. What a wonderful Trilogy he composed!

 
 Posted:   May 25, 2013 - 6:16 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

Carter Burwell didn't like The Jackal and after his score was remixed by someone else even considered taking his name of the film

Not only remixed, but portions of the score were dialed out and even removed. The film was butchered in an attempt to save it.



I won't say which project, since I don't recall if I can, but there was one Leonard Rosenman worked on where he was having trouble and didn't like the project, and after it was done recording, he did something very similar to a story above with Elmer: he walked out the stage, to his fancy car, and just drove away.

 
 
 Posted:   May 26, 2013 - 5:08 AM   
 By:   ian642002   (Member)

I think if you are a working professional in Hollywood, certainly if you were of Goldsmith's era, there is little expectation that the bulk of product you will be working on will be anything better than mediocre. You get lucky with a strong picture from time to time but you'd starve waiting for it. And Jerry came up through TV, where you just had to keep going without much thought as to whether you were getting Shakespeare week after week. You turn down too much then producers stop asking. Goldsmith is admired because his professionalism and his inspired application of his craft was not dependent on the quality of one project or another. It's as if he couldn't turn it off, whether it was Chinatown or The Swarm. I think Gerald Fried was like that too. He never seemed to be on auto pilot.

I couldn't have put it better myself. Goldsmith - as we know - had an almighty work ethic that saw him jump from project to project without probably ever knowing how they were going to to turn out. He was in a business that saw him line up three or four future projects that may or may not have ever materialised. You couldn't judge a masterpiece with a way of working like that. That's possibly how sometimes a composer gets to work on a pile of crap he doesn't like. Tomorrow's promising project becomes today's waste of time.

 
 
 Posted:   May 26, 2013 - 9:10 AM   
 By:   CindyLover   (Member)

He wasn't fond of "The Mummy" either, and declined to score the sequel.

Goldsmith said something down the lines of 'That was a stupid movie' (about 'The Mummy'). It was at a concert at The Barbican in London.

Neither of these statements are true. I was at the Barbican in London and all he said was that he wasn't invited to score the sequel to The Mummy.


I was there as well, and I'm pretty sure he used the word "stupid" in connection with The Mummy.

 
 
 Posted:   May 26, 2013 - 10:02 AM   
 By:   DavidCorkum   (Member)

Supposedly John Williams has an escape clause in his contract that allows him to bow out of a film assignment if he doesn't like the finished film, perhaps the result of doing a couple of duds in the early 80's. Goldsmith once referred to Williams as a "snob", perhaps as a reference to this, which as we all know Goldsmith certainly did not practice and would have considered unprofessional.

Goldsmith often sounded a little conflicted with regards to fame. He seemed to want recognition, such as his frustrations with the Oscars, but rarely seemed self-congratulatory, seemingly of the opinion that what he did should be of little interest outside of people in the industry.

 
 Posted:   May 26, 2013 - 11:35 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

These guys are professionals. They don't have to love a movie to score it.

Think about your own day job. Do you love it? I mean, every day? Probably not. But does that stop you being a professional? Does it stop you trying to do a good job?

Going back to Barry, he famously hated BORN FREE. And yet it resulted in one of the best loved and most famous movie scores ever. And netted him two Academy Awards.

Cheers

 
 
 Posted:   May 26, 2013 - 11:46 AM   
 By:   musicpaladin2007   (Member)

I remember Jerry Goldsmith's 1989 concert at the Barbican, which was broadcast live on the radio.

JG: "Who here is a Star Trek fan?"

Crowd cheers

JG: "Well, I'm not one."


Not being a fan is not the same as hating. If he really hated them so much, he would not have accepted scoring assignments for 5 of them.

James Horner, on the other hand, did hate it, only did III as a favor and refused to return after that.

 
 Posted:   May 26, 2013 - 12:00 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

James Horner, on the other hand, did hate it, only did III as a favor and refused to return after that.

Say what?! Got a quote? I seem to remember Horner being quite excited with the prospect of scoring ST TWOK as well as SFS. Though maybe he didn't care for the sequel as much as he thought he would.

 
 
 Posted:   May 26, 2013 - 12:08 PM   
 By:   musicpaladin2007   (Member)

James Horner, on the other hand, did hate it, only did III as a favor and refused to return after that.

Say what?! Got a quote? I seem to remember Horner being quite excited with the prospect of scoring ST TWOK as well as SFS. Though maybe he didn't care for the sequel as much as he thought he would.


I seem to recall he was more unhappy with the rushes and demands of the production schedule and dealing with the producers and refused to ever do another Star Trek movie. The actual movie I don't think he had a problem with. Which seems to be a trend with him, didn't he have some kind of falling out with James Cameron?

 
 
 Posted:   May 26, 2013 - 12:13 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

TO STEPHEN WOOLSTON-Sure, you said it, this thread and all this information should not surprise anyone. It has been known for those who inquire for years, that the fan, the viewer has a whole different perspective then the participant of the venture. Be it film, books, sports, you name it.How many movie stars have said they never watch movies much or the films they did. I myself can relate to that like so many others who here might have spent time indulging in the industry itself. I don't think a lot of viewers really understand that or more likely they don't care to. A fan needs to in their world create a leisure pleasure separated from the real world of the event. Sports fans are famous for that, but so are movie fans and other ventures we enjoy in life. As we toil through a life for most people which is working , paying our bills and surviving. Exactly, we don't always love our jobs, but we do what we have to do or go under, THAT'S LIFE.

 
 
 Posted:   May 26, 2013 - 1:48 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

These guys are professionals. They don't have to love a movie to score it.

Think about your own day job. Do you love it? I mean, every day? Probably not. But does that stop you being a professional? Does it stop you trying to do a good job?

Going back to Barry, he famously hated BORN FREE. And yet it resulted in one of the best loved and most famous movie scores ever. And netted him two Academy Awards.

Cheers


It's a job, of course, but we're also dealing with ART here, so it is only natural that the artists invest more of their evaluations and feeilngs into the projects, compared with most other "normal" jobs.

 
 
 Posted:   May 26, 2013 - 2:11 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

I agree,a typical 9 to 5 job unless you are running the company or a top executive in the company, you do leave your job behind both mentally and psychically when you go out the door. While a artist in a venture has it with him 24/7 to a certain extent. But even a artist it will depend upon his or her personality. For instance, a director of mine on one of my films, the minute he finished shooting the scenes, took off, and that was that. Not uncommon but all post production duties, editing , music etc were in my hands and my -co workers, editor, composer etc. I am sure this applies to many film composers as well as examples shown here on this thread. Out of sight out of mind can sometimes apply to all jobs.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.