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 Posted:   Jun 6, 2013 - 3:18 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Could be, yes.

I have a double problem, because I sleep very lightly and am "allergic" to any type of noise. So I've used earplugs to sleep for the last 16 years if any noise occurs (in neighbouring apartments, for example). I'm not sure if that is one of the causes to the tinnitus. Could be.

So on the one hand, I need the sound pillow to mask the tinnitus, on the other hand I need complete 'earplug' silence to sleep. You can see how that creates a dilemma.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2013 - 5:17 AM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

Hmm. Thor, I'm beginning to see why you dislike bombastic film music.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2013 - 5:19 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Indeed.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2013 - 10:37 AM   
 By:   Michael24   (Member)

I have a double problem, because I sleep very lightly and am "allergic" to any type of noise. So I've used earplugs to sleep for the last 16 years if any noise occurs (in neighbouring apartments, for example). I'm not sure if that is one of the causes to the tinnitus. Could be.

I believe ear plugs are what caused my problems. While I didn't wear them every single night, I did go a couple years where I would wear them frequently while sleeping. And I think by wearing them so often, my ears weren't able to drain properly, which lead to the gradual wax build up, which lead to the ear infections behind the blockage, which (I believe) caused some damage and led to the tinnitus. I immediately threw out my ear plugs, but by then it was too late and now I'm stuck with the noise in the left ear.

Awhile back, a friend of mine mentioned he was thinking of wearing ear plugs in order to better sleep at night, and I almost blurted out "NO!" just like people do in the movies. Haha! But I told him my situation and that it's strongly possible too-frequent use of ear plugs caused it.

 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2013 - 11:47 AM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

Yes, several varieties of tinnitus exist, with several causes: high frequency single pitch, high frequency white noise, low frequency buzz. It's not always caused by hearing damage from loud noises. Intracranial fluid pressure can also affect it. The telltale sign here is that it's worse after sleep.

It is. It's at its worst when I wake up in the morning.


Sounds like what I think I have. I'm seeing a specialist in July, not specifically for tinnitus but for what I believe is too much pressure in the cerebro-spinal fluid. Tinnitus is just one effect of many I've experienced over the years (e.g. eye floaters, fluid leaking from nose, dizzy spells, neck and back pain). Now I strongly suspect they may all be linked.


I have a very similar issue with my ears, but it's not limited to waking up. It is a persistant hissing noise, 70% left ear, 30% right. Mine is always accompanied with a sensation of pressure or stuffiness in my ears. That's what prompted me to see the ENT; I thought I had a bad ear infection but a Nurse Practitioner didn't detect any. The ENT assured me my inner ears, etc., were fluid-free and stated "that's how it is, learn to live with it; I have it, too."

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2013 - 1:49 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

I used ear plugs for many years (not any longer), but I haven't experienced tinnitus as a result of that.

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2013 - 3:44 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

In my case I think it's a result of audio volume; going to concerts and festivals, I even had a DJ phase where I'd do turntables with friends and we always had a big amp installation, the louder the better was the motto back in the day. I've never had a wax related infection, as a matter of fact I clean my ears on a regular basis and when I went to have my hearing checked it was all perfect for my age. So I suspect it has to be pure volume related issue for me. I'm now of course more self aware of it and when I go to a (metal) concert I bring along plugs (it doesn't detract from the performance at all).

I'm fortunate that I can still tolerate heavy bombastic film music as it's a side of scores I appreciate a lot, I would be devastated if I couldn't sit through it anymore just because of the tinnitus, which is why I'm more careful now.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2013 - 7:33 AM   
 By:   avalanche   (Member)

I have a very similar issue with my ears, but it's not limited to waking up. It is a persistant hissing noise, 70% left ear, 30% right. Mine is always accompanied with a sensation of pressure or stuffiness in my ears. That's what prompted me to see the ENT; I thought I had a bad ear infection but a Nurse Practitioner didn't detect any. The ENT assured me my inner ears, etc., were fluid-free and stated "that's how it is, learn to live with it; I have it, too."

I have this too. I was diagnosed with cochlear hydrops, a form of Meniere's Disease, about 18 months ago. Full-blown Meniere's involves dizziness, which I don't have (yet).

A low-salt diet and certain supplements (lemon bioflavinoids, l-lysine) can help the fullness feeling and reduce the ringing a bit.

 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2013 - 5:41 AM   
 By:   DeputyRiley   (Member)

Well it's officially time for me to join this afflicted club. I have been experiencing a noticeable ringing in my ears for the past few years and finally was officially diagnosed with irreparable tinnitus yesterday after visiting a head, neck, and ear physician specialist. Most likely it has been caused by constant (you guessed it) daily listening of film music through earbuds! I've never listened to my film music particularly loud, but the structure of the earbuds and their extreme proximity to the inner ear, as I'm sure you all know, does not help matters. I have significantly reduced the volume at which I listen to music on my earbuds but it is quite possibly time to reduce my use of these listening devices and at the very least switching to some headphones or padded listening device.

This news was actually kind of devastating...to know that I will live with this for the rest of my life and there is nothing I can do about it. Of course, this thread has given me a number of options to explore to help reduce the ringing and make the condition more tolerable, and for that information I am very grateful to this community. However, even though I've been getting used to the ringing for the past few years leading up to the official M.D. diagnosis yesterday, I am still saddened by the irony of my greatest passion in life indirectly causing physical damage. I could look at it that the music didn't cause the damage but my own habit of mid-volume (occasionally high volume) listening and chosen method of listening device contributed more significantly, but you get my point.

On another hand, I do know that I'm getting older, turning 35 next March and as far as developing conditions as it were, this isn't the worst, and I know people have it much worse. There are many times throughout the day that I am distracted enough by life or whatever so as to not notice the ringing, but it is still present and noticeable over conversation, over music, at night, etc. It is a quality of life issue for sure, and tremendously frustrating, but doesn't affect my sleeping habits and causes very little anxiety (so far).

I will go back through this thread (and I saw another one "Tinnitus, anyone?") for the support and tips that it provides, and thank everyone again for offering their story and thoughts.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2013 - 5:54 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Welcome to the club, Deputy, although it's probably not a club you'd have wanted to join. At 36 next month, we're about the same age, and it's not that great to get the diagnosis at such a young age, relatively speaking.

I was a bit devastated when I got the diagnosis of chronic tinnitus in 2008 too, but by now I've become somewhat accustomed to it. It's just part of me when I'm awake, like a "ringing friend". Sounds strange, but there you go.

The way I listen to film music -- the use of film music -- has changed a bit, and it might do for you too, but it seems like yours isn't the worst kind. Unlike me, it doesn't seem to bother your sleeping patterns -- for which you should be blessed.

 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2013 - 6:25 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

The main thing is to focus on it.

I know that´s extremely difficult. But believe me, it is is possible to learn to not to pay too much attention to it and feel much better.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2013 - 6:36 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

The main thing is to focus on it.

...is NOT to focus on it, I guess you wanted to say.

Yeah, that's the key. But after a while, this comes almost automatically.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2013 - 8:53 AM   
 By:   Smitty   (Member)

I know someone who suffers from tinnitus. He would go to all kinds of loud concerts and play music very loudly in his car with the windows up. I guess it all caught up to him. His joy for music greatly diminished as a result.

While most of my listening is through quality external speakers, I do listen to music via earbuds during long runs. I keep the volume low, however. Though I don't exactly know what it's like to have prolonged tinnitus, I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy.

 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2013 - 9:46 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

The main thing is to focus on it.

...is NOT to focus on it, I guess you wanted to say.

Yeah, that's the key. But after a while, this comes almost automatically.


Whoops...

Well, focussing. Obviously a problem ;-)

 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2013 - 9:59 AM   
 By:   mark ford   (Member)

I can't remember when I developed tinnitus, but it has been a few yeas now. For me it's a high pitched squealing\hissing sound that modulates, sounding much like a hard drive going bad. I guess the good news for me has been it has never gotten any worse and I no longer notice (or pay attention to) it as much even though it is ever present. It seems that time has helped me adjust to it somewhat. Still there are those times...

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2013 - 11:58 AM   
 By:   John McMasters   (Member)

I've had tinnitus for many years -- mine is a low level sort of dog whistle sound -- that comes and goes and wavers in and out in both ears. My doctors think that mine, as expected, came from years of loud concerts when I was in college -- although I was also a DJ for many years and wore headphones as a part of that job. I also think that at least a part of mine is due to pressure in the inner ear, etc., as there are times when I am very relaxed and the tinnitus just disappears for hours at a time.

I am almost totally oblivious to any discomfort -- I've used a white noise machine since before the onset of the affliction -- so getting to sleep has not been an issue for me.

I also don't notice the "sound" when I listen to music anymore. I do think that as I've aged some tones seem a bit more shrill that they used to be (violins, flutes, brass) but that may just be my imagination.

I have to use headphones when listening to music as my apartment is situated fairly close to a major auto expressway in NYC -- that's the only way I can eliminate cars honking from my daily dose of Herrmann.

 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2013 - 12:45 PM   
 By:   Charles Thaxton   (Member)

Mine developed a little over a year ago following an air-pressure change pop going into a store on a windy day following my morning shower. First my high frequencies got a resonant distortion then after a month or so tinnitus started. I saw 2 ENTs and an audiologist who all shrugged and basically say....shit happens. Mine started off as the "old tube TV whine" now has toned down a lot to a subtle hissing which comes and goes. As a musician I got really despondent but as it improved I just surrendered. I still have full range hearing but there's this paper rattling/blown speaker cone distortion on the left which remains, just at certain frequencies. My ear drums are fine and no wax etc. This can happen on airplanes or anywhere sudden air pressure changes occur.

 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2013 - 1:00 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

Listening I only play at moderate levels, whether through headphones or speakers. But when editing I'm listening at high levels through headphones to judge crossfades and edits etc and I fear years of that has done me some damage. I have a slight high-pitched ringing I become aware of now and then.
But I think wearing earplugs at night, every night for several years, does me as much, if not more, damage. I live off a busy street and I'd be awakened if I didn't sleep with earplugs. But I'm convinced they've had a negative effect over time.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2013 - 1:01 PM   
 By:   Midnight Mike   (Member)

Here’s some info that I hope can help some fellow sufferers. I’ve had Tinnitus for 20 years now. I have learned to live with it, but I still hear it at night, when it is quiet.

But, recently over the last few years it had gotten a lot worse, and I’ve been protecteing my ears very well over the years, wearing ear plugs on the subway, and even in the movies sometimes, just to avoid loud noise. (I just carry around small foam ear-plugs with me at all times)

Anyway, I went to the doctor for a routine physical and a blood test revealed that my vitamin B12 levels were low, so my doc recommended I take a daily supplement.

I have taken it for the last few months and my tinnitus has diminished greatly! It has not gone away, but it has “turned the volume way down” on it. I did some reading up on it and apparently low B12 levels can cause a ringing in your ears. I had no idea.

So maybe you can have a doc check your B12 levels and see if you need a supplement.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2013 - 3:19 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Mine developed a little over a year ago following an air-pressure change pop going into a store on a windy day following my morning shower. First my high frequencies got a resonant distortion then after a month or so tinnitus started. I saw 2 ENTs and an audiologist who all shrugged and basically say....shit happens. Mine started off as the "old tube TV whine"

Yeah, that's "my" sound too. It's constant 24/7, in all waking seconds. The hearing range has also been reduced drastically, esp. on my left ear where the tinnitus is worst. I do think a degree of hyper-acusis comes with the affliction (extra sensitivity to high sounds), but this varies from individual to individual.

 
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