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 Posted:   Jun 30, 2013 - 9:33 PM   
 By:   Khan   (Member)

Haha! Some posts here have turned out some comedy gold. Threads like this should be called "How Elitist Can You Be?"

Indeed.

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2013 - 9:35 PM   
 By:   Khan   (Member)

Really? I've never seen that. Is somebody actually keeping track of what I say about scores to nail me if I change my mind?

It happened to David in either his Brian Tyler thread or in the NYSM score thread, I think. And it's happened elsewhere. I think it's less that people keep track of what others say and more that some are for some reason interested enough to search through old posts to find a previous opinion that somehow invalidates the new one in order to score argument points or something.


That's not the only instance sadly. I haven't seen that forum member post for a while so maybe he got banned. He was quite rude about it too. I would love it if someone said some of the things uttered on this forum to my face. But then again, I don't think anyone would.


I have uttered things similar, and worse, to someone face to face. And would do it again if the situation called for it.

Also, let me add that it's not the fact that you changed your mind; who cares about that. It's the manner in which you did it (quitting FSM because people were praising Tyler, taking a shot at the ENTIRE forum by saying the only person you wanted to talk to was Mike West, and then coming back a few weeks later only to go over the top in your own praise of Tyler) that is worthy of such scorn and derision.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2013 - 10:06 PM   
 By:   facehugger   (Member)

Haha! Some posts here have turned out some comedy gold. Threads like this should be called "How Elitist Can You Be?"

Dude, that should be the name of this whole site these days.

That, or BFD: bitch-fest-daily


And yet some guys can't help reading the whole lot of bitching posts and, strangely, be turned on with certain Pavlovian reactions.

I wonder what those people get out of repeatedly being ridiculed and looked down upon by said elitists.

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2013 - 10:57 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

I wonder what those people get out of repeatedly being ridiculed and looked down upon by said elitists.


I think that if you've got something worthwhile to add to the discusion, it shouldn't take much work to phrase it in a positive or pleasant manner. Take the quote to which I responded above:

". . . And yes, perhaps Mr. Williams oeuvre would have benefitted from the odd break from Spielberg, but that we will never know."

What ignorant, pretentious horseshit, right? But I resisted saying that (until now), in the hopes of making a more worthwhile point. The other collaborations Williams has explored apart from his longstanding one with Spielberg over the last couple of decades have yielded a number of interesting scores any composer would envy having written. Even what he wrote for Chris Columbus movies alone would make for a pretty good "oeuvre" (to use the "smarter"-sounding French term) in and of itself. . . . Why dredge up negativity if we have the opportunity instead to try to enlighten each other?

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2013 - 11:24 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

Well for starters I used to hate Jerry Goldsmith music. The first time I listened to any of it I was put off. I got so much praise from everyone that I pushed forward until now he is one of my favorites. It took a lot of experimenting and finding out what style of his scores I enjoy and which ones I hate.

 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2013 - 12:11 AM   
 By:   Zoragoth   (Member)



I hear ya. While I generally enjoyed the Indy flicks, I did abhor the second installement. Big time!


That one was indeed the worst. The one good thing to come out of it: the Children's March!

I also agree with you in large part that Mr. Spielberg more a less reached his peak with DUEL, not yet having formed many of the bad habits that plagued several of his future projects(obnoxious kid, ADT plotting and and general overabundance of syrup... etc), but that is a matter of taste and not of fact of course.

Absolutely. There will always be those, raised on his films and cultural worldview, for lack of a better way of putting it, who will think he is Orson Welles. Thank you for letting me know I'm not the only one leery of Spielberg out here! ;-)


And for the record, I was in almost complete accord with your Brainstorm review, which was a very impressive early effort by Horner - made even more impresive by the outstanding re-recording by Varese Sarabande. However, I soon became disenchanted with the (then) relatively young composer, who not for one moment made me doubt Mr. Williams vast, vast talent.


Well said. Chalk my irate overreaction to the "Indiana Jones" effect! And for the record, it's not that those films are really *bad* per se, but they are wildly overrated. I think it's a case of films hitting the culture in just the right, lucky way upon their release, and quality often is a minor factor in such cases.



And yes, perhaps Mr. Williams oeuvre would have benefitted from the odd break from Spielberg, but that we will never know.

Anyway, thanks for a fun trip into the, seemingly, distant past. smile

PS. You wouldn't happen to have a copy of that review lying around would you?


Laughing here, because I was about to ask *you!* Unfortunately, I lost all my SOUNDTRACK back issues, along with so much else, in a flood here in Fort Collins in '97. I notice that some of these are being republished online, along with CINEMASCORE articles. I've not checked in a while but hope more will appear as time goes by.

And, thank *you* in return! It's a good feeling to have a piece one has written remembered so long after the fact, even in cases like this where the writer is being held to account! ;-)

 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2013 - 5:01 AM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

YOR did not liked Goldsmith's "Total Recall" the first times he listened to it.

But them, after more listenings, YOR got it and it magicaly become one of YOR's favorite scores!

James Horner was one of YOR's favorite composers long time ago.

Now, YOR cannot remember what was the last of Horner that he really liked. "A Far of Place", maybe...

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2013 - 11:11 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I must admit that I haven't noticed any 'derision' for people having a change of heart about things. If this has occured, it must have passed me by (and few things do).

But we've had quite a few threads about this over the years. Personally, I think it's a very natural and HEALTHY thing to avoid stasis, to continously explore and to re-evaluate previous preferences. That's what makes us grow as humanbeings.

Of course, we will always have a strong connection to the things we discovered in our formative years. This is something I see on this board all the time, and I'm 'guilty' of it myself. I don't see myself disliking the favourite discoveries of those years -- whether it's John Williams, Danny Elfman, Elliot Goldenthal, Hans Zimmer Supertramp, Pink Floyd, Jean Michel Jarre or The Alan Parsons Project, just to mention some. The passion for these artists may fluctuate a bit, but they will always be in my heart and I will always revisit them when I'm in the mood.

However, our interest in films and music branch out in many different directions that are in constant flux. I used to hate Bernard Herrmann; now I 'get' his cluster approach and find myself enjoying several of his scores. I used to prefer big, rambunctious action music; now I'm more into calmer, ambient, textural music of various kinds.

There is a whole slew of factors influencing our cognitive beings -- some of them biological (my fairly recent tinnitus affliction, for example), some psychological, some social and some cultural. A change of perspective is perfectly natural. So is the 'firm' love for certain things that have stayed with us since our formative years and will probably stay with us till we die.

 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2013 - 3:17 PM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

evolved John Adams' neo-minimalism, which is anything but "simple". (Don Davis' Matrix is basically a (good) rip off of his music).

again this questionable statement yet to be proved.
A clever use of quotes to pontificate and cleverly hide incompetence.


I suggest you give a listen to John Adams' "Harmonielehre" a listen. It has all the proof you'll ever need, even for any incompetent person.


Thanks for reply.
I did listen to Harmonielehre and YES there is something similar with The Matrix.
But something means something and not a rip-off.
It's a fantastic melting pot and you can even go back in music history (I can hear in part II chunks of Fantastic Voyage by Rosenman).
Anyway thank you for this plunge into beautiful John Adams' world.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 1:25 PM   
 By:   DavidCoscina   (Member)


I have uttered things similar, and worse, to someone face to face. And would do it again if the situation called for it.


I don't think it was you who said something about riding Tyler's jock and that was plain uncalled for given this is a forum about enjoying soundtracks for heaven's sake. And I don't think someone would be that rude to say something like that to my face. Or I would hope not as that would say a lot more about the author of such a remark and their moral lexicon.

Also, let me add that it's not the fact that you changed your mind; who cares about that. It's the manner in which you did it (quitting FSM because people were praising Tyler, taking a shot at the ENTIRE forum by saying the only person you wanted to talk to was Mike West, and then coming back a few weeks later only to go over the top in your own praise of Tyler) that is worthy of such scorn and derision.

Seems like no one except you is hung up on this point.


 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 2:38 PM   
 By:   Khan   (Member)

Oh, the irony.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 2:41 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

I like pancakes.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 2:57 PM   
 By:   Khan   (Member)

I like pancakes.

I like French toast better.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 4:07 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

I like pancakes.

In the past, I used to prefer the finesse of a French crepe, but now I have come around and love the tantalizing fluffiness of the american pancake as well. Why settle for one when you have both, says this pompous and pretentious elitist?

Best pancakes ever! http://www.pantrycafe.com/

Yummers!

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 6:17 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

I like pancakes.

In the past, I used to prefer the finesse of a French crepe, but now I have come around and love the tantalizing fluffiness of the american pancake as well. Why settle for one when you have both, says this pompous and pretentious elitist?

Best pancakes ever! http://www.pantrycafe.com/

Yummers!



I'm glad that you've had a change of perspective on pancakes. They are my favorite breakfast treat.
Strawberry Banana crepes are out of this world.

And yes, Khan, French Toast is superb, but you have to cook it properly. Nothing is worse than when the inside is all gooey with uncooked egg bits. Yuk. I recommend 15 seconds in the microwave to ensure maximum french toast enjoyment.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 7:38 PM   
 By:   JJH   (Member)

Khan,


you don't like...WAFFLES?

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 7:55 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

Khan,


you don't like...WAFFLES?



I think he ate one too many waffles on Ceti Alpha 5. He was marooned there with only a waffle grill.
Brings back bad memories.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 8:14 PM   
 By:   Khan   (Member)

Khan,


you don't like...WAFFLES?


Only when your mom makes them for me.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 8:52 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

Zing!

 
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