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 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 2:45 AM   
 By:   Kari Tuhkanen   (Member)

I really am hoping for a double release for season 7 there is some really lovely stuff in there (I want the piece played in Victorian London from the Xmas ep, when Clara is following the Doctor up the stairs) and like Ford I would love a full rendition of Clara's theme.

Thanks for the MTV link, I hadn't seen that interview but its nice to see him get recognition as he is very much a part of this reborn Who. (Still hoping some of the earlier stuff will get a second release down the line, as he suggested to me it might)


Very interesting tidbit, thanks. The more we get Gold´s Doctor Who music, the better. The vitality of it all; it´s just overwhelming.

 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 5:06 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

I didn't realize Murray Gold was so young. It would have to be a 2 CD set. One episode in particular had a lot of great music in it, and that would fill up half a disc on its own.

 
 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 5:43 AM   
 By:   Kari Tuhkanen   (Member)

Yes, he was born in 1969, close to my own age.
I haven´t seen the last half of the series 7, so I can´t comment the music that much; heard only some from The Rings of Akhaten, which is frankly splendid. Of course the first half of the series was full of great music.

 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 8:49 AM   
 By:   Other Tallguy   (Member)

I didn't realize Murray Gold was so young.

Since he's my age I will only say "Thank you." big grin

 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 1:27 PM   
 By:   pete   (Member)

I didn't realize he was so old!^^

 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 1:47 PM   
 By:   pete   (Member)

Despite knowing the truth, I always hear a woman's voice when I listen to Vale Decem. To the point where I'm freaked out by videos like this.

From the 4-minute mark:

 
 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 2:02 PM   
 By:   Kari Tuhkanen   (Member)

That´s Mark Chambers, a countertenor. Wikipedia says that it "is a type of classical male singing voice whose vocal range is equivalent to that of a contralto or mezzo-soprano voice type."
I think his voice works beautifully in Vale Decem.

 
 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 2:32 PM   
 By:   tarasis   (Member)

If you pop over to the other side of the board and look in the Eurovision thread, you'll see another example of a countertenor with a hellish impressive voice (I'd like to youtube but its a phaff from the iPad).

Second to last post

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=89241&forumID=7&archive=0

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2013 - 1:03 PM   
 By:   Kari Tuhkanen   (Member)

Just watched DW7 and it only strengthened my perceptions of Murray Gold´s abilities to deliver first-class music to every episode. He still has the same vitality and energy as before to bring to the images that something, which only the best composers can do, call it synergy or interaction. I love his tendency to score highly unorthodoxically; for example, not many composers would use action music under a dialogue (or a monologue in Doctor´s case)! For me, he has brought freshness, a sort of exuberance to the art of film scoring, that I have badly missed. If ever there was a composer who enjoys what he´s doing, it´s Gold. So infectious and exhilarating is his stuff!
Few highlights for me (just scratching the surface):
-Clara´s Theme (in many episodes, but especially in The Snowmen, where the theme goes literally to heavenly spheres with piano and choir, as Clara follows the Doctor and starts climbing the ladder and the staircase).
-Farewell theme to the Ponds (in few of the early episodes, but it truly blossoms in The Angels Take Manhattan with female voice).
-Wake Up, the song from The Rings of Akhaten (uplifting and melancholic at the same time; integral to the story, just like Abigail´s Song was earlier).
-Couple of nice versions of I Am the Doctor (Cold War comes to mind, where the theme gets exciting synth-accompanied version. There´s also variation with a pounding rhythmic brass pattern on top of string ostinato, that is first heard in The Bells of Saint John. And yet another dynamic variation that is first used in The Doctor, the Widow and the Wardrobe).
-A very welcome return of the Gallifrey theme at the beginning of The Name of the Doctor.
-Several action themes and motifs, especially at the end of The Name of the Doctor, where Clara enters the Doctor´s timestream (the same striking motif (closely related to I Am the Doctor) was first used in The Asylum of the Daleks and in the early trailer music). And The Rings of Akhaten has a really rousing theme in the scene, where the Doctor and Clara try to rescue the Queen of Years.
Plenty to choose there as always; The Snowmen has in fact so much wonderful music in it that it deserves a CD of its own.
Still, in my opinion, some of the greatest music composed for television today (and for any medium for that matter). The fun and the vigor, the beauty and the awe; you just can´t resist it! It´s full of life, the kind of music that makes you proud to be alive.
So, bring on as many CDs as you like Silva Screen Records. I take ´em all!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2013 - 3:24 AM   
 By:   Kari Tuhkanen   (Member)

Silva Screen Records has just announced a 2CD set of Series 7 music out this autumn, as well as a Series one and two 12 inch vinyl! No tracklistings yet.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2013 - 3:55 AM   
 By:   tarasis   (Member)

I was just about to post that

link: http://www.doctorwhomusic.com/doctor-who-series-7/ and cover

 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2013 - 7:08 AM   
 By:   jedizim   (Member)

Love that cover...and can't wait for the release!

 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2013 - 5:34 PM   
 By:   edwzoomom   (Member)

Love that cover...and can't wait for the release!

Dr. Who was actually the Final Question on Jeopardy today:


"In 2013, Britain marked this show's 50th Anniv. with a series of stamps of the 11 actors who have played the lead role"

This is certainly not the first time Dr. Who has been the Jeopardy question either:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IT-XFRFxG5A

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 12:39 AM   
 By:   ian642002   (Member)

Wake Up, the song from The Rings of Akhaten (uplifting and melancholic at the same time; integral to the story, just like Abigail´s Song was earlier).

Both episode and the music for it were deemed the worst many had seen and heard in a long time. And they were right. A squirm-inducing experience.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 3:53 AM   
 By:   Kari Tuhkanen   (Member)

For me, it´s a profound episode about lost possibilities and untold stories and chance meetings and has criticism of empty religions to boot. The solitary leaf is a wonderful metaphor throughout the episode; mother´s love is at the core of this story.
The writer Neil Cross has especially distinguished himself penning two scientifically fascinating episodes to Doctor Who, and it says a lot that both Steven Moffat and Murray Gold consider him a show-runner level guy.
And the music to The Rings of Akhaten is easily one of the best he has written to the entire series, and not just the song. The action music is frankly thrilling.

There are plenty of positive reviews around, if you care to counterbalance the negative.

Cynics should steer clear of it though. But that´s just the Doctor for you.

 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 5:10 AM   
 By:   mstrox   (Member)

I didn't care at all for that episode, although a rewatch may do it good. The one thing I do remember liking was the music, though - looking forward to hearing it again.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 5:18 AM   
 By:   ian642002   (Member)

For me, it´s a profound episode about lost possibilities and untold stories and chance meetings and has criticism of empty religions to boot. The solitary leaf is a wonderful metaphor throughout the episode; mother´s love is at the core of this story.

Yecch.

Yes, I suppose I am a cynic, but I do like Doctor Who and always have done. But that episode was like having half a ton of sugar being pushed down your throat (and in your ears). If you like the kind of tatty sentimentality that could floor rhinos, fair enough.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 7:23 AM   
 By:   Kari Tuhkanen   (Member)

I don´t see it differ that much from any given episode emotion-wise. The new Doctor Who has thrived just because of its overtly emotional tone (and it´s not the first time Murray Gold is in the line of fire). Russell T. Davies´ era especially excelled in that area. It just isn´t everybody´s cup of tea I guess. I love it over-the-top.

However, it´s not my favorite episode of Series 7. But I think the themes handled are still relevant.

What matters to me, is the level of enjoyment emotionally and intellectually I get from a work of art. Plenty here.

 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 7:38 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Wake Up, the song from The Rings of Akhaten (uplifting and melancholic at the same time; integral to the story, just like Abigail´s Song was earlier).

Both episode and the music for it were deemed the worst many had seen and heard in a long time. And they were right. A squirm-inducing experience.


Yeah I have to agree. I couldn't stand that episode or the music. Even the effects were bad. Everything about that episode was b-a-d, BAD. But every series has a stinker or two.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 3:59 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

As has been said here, many dislike The Rings of Akhaten episode and score. But some of those who hated the episode have admitted that the score played better in the concert setting of the Proms. Something at least.

Now the scorn is being aimed at Song for 50. For me it was only the lyrics that I found perhaps a little cheesy. I mentioned this to some classical music buffs in my local pub, and they asked me what the overall effect was, and I of course replied "stunning". They said that up to a point, the lyrics might not be so important (if you have a problem with them), as many Opera fans love the form without ever understanding a word since it's in Italian or another language anyway! And let's face it, this was Murray's own bit of self indulgence, his own expression of fondness for our favourite show. He has more than earned the right to let it all out as far as I'm concerned, especially as it results in such a fantastic piece, which is filling my ears as I type.

I can tell you Kari, that the Prom at the weekend was a very emotional occasion. With the last Prom, there was a visual presentation of all the Doctors regenerations set to This is Gallifrey, which brought the house down. Well, this year they did the same thing set to Vale Decem. It was double the emotion and double the response! Plus we had recognition of the past composers from the Classic era, including the famous BBC Radiophonic Workshop and Dudley Simpson. Now in his nineties it must have been his wildest dream to hear his lovely piano music from City of Death (1979 starring Tom Baker) performed in such a wonderful way. He must have had tears in his eyes, 'cause I know I did! On top of all this joining the present day stars, were 5th Doctor Peter Davison, and original companion (to William Hartnell, 1963) Carole Ann Ford.

My ears are still ringing from this concert. Mainly because I haven't stopped playing it! I look forward to the next such occasion. The music, for a fan like me, presents a far more emotional connection than any convention could, much as I enjoy those too.





 
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