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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: The Yakuza
 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2012 - 3:58 AM   
 By:   gmanca   (Member)

I got this "just" for Shine On, it's that good.

 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2012 - 5:03 AM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

When listening to--and grooving to--Grusin's jazzy, funky masterwork cue, I feel as though I'm wearing a turtleneck sweater, maroon-leather jacket, tan slacks--slightly flared, of course--while having a drink in the darkest lounge in Tokyo.

Who today could look as good in those duds as Mitch, James Coburn, or Steve McQueen? Samuel L. Jackson most likely. I'm not sure about anyone else. big grin

Fantastic movie with a score to match. I'm very happy that I bought this CD a couple of years ago.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2012 - 6:09 AM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)

'Shine On' is, as Jim Phelps pointed out a long time ago, a funky Grusin masterwork. Like Lalo Schifrin, he can conjure up appealing source music cues that aren't merely background musak; there's some serious jazzin and soloin' going on.

Grusin's Assignment Vienna score has several of these type of cues - the only reason I bought the TV Omnibus set really.

As for The Yakuza, I like the fact that it's an atypical score - lots of calming music, flutes and tinkling percussion. A very atmospheric late-night listen.

 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2012 - 3:01 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Amazon has a good deal on the Mitchum Signature Collection (which includes The Yakuza). $21.99:

http://tinyurl.com/7e8vu7d

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2012 - 3:31 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)



1. Grusin's Assignment Vienna score has several of these type of cues - the only reason I bought the TV Omnibus set really.

2. As for The Yakuza, I like the fact that it's an atypical score - lots of calming music, flutes and tinkling percussion. A very atmospheric late-night listen.


1. I disagree. Grusin's "Assignment Vienna" scores are very repetitive and formulaic: cimbalom ad nauseum.

2. "The Yakuza" is the companion piece to the melancolic "The Heart is a Lonely Hunter".
Please listen to "Tokyo Return", "20 Year Montage", "Scapbook Montage".
"The Yakuza" is also very ethnico-esoteric: see the eerie waterphone use in "Tanner to Tono" as an example.

 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2012 - 6:52 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Who today could look as good in those duds as Mitch, James Coburn, or Steve McQueen? Samuel L. Jackson most likely. I'm not sure about anyone else. big grin


He might wear the clothes, but it's all become too self conscious ("retrocentric"), if you know what I mean. Besides that, I don't see any performers filling those guys' shoes anytime soon...

 
 Posted:   Jun 17, 2012 - 8:15 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Who today could look as good in those duds as Mitch, James Coburn, or Steve McQueen? Samuel L. Jackson most likely. I'm not sure about anyone else. big grin


Steven Keats in Eddie Coyle sports those duds. Hell, he even has the piss-colored glasses.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56KpNt6Krns

 
 Posted:   Jun 17, 2012 - 8:20 AM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

There is something so sublimly appealing about listening to this score in the purposeful solitude of one's home on a rainy Saturday afternoon...

Boy, I hit it right on this one.

 
 Posted:   Jun 17, 2012 - 9:03 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

There is something so sublimly appealing about listening to this score in the purposeful solitude of one's home on a rainy Saturday afternoon...

Boy, I hit it right on this one.


Any and all accolades about this great score are "right on the head." Listening to it now.

 
 Posted:   Jun 17, 2012 - 9:24 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"I have destroyed his past, and his future."

That line by Mitchum and the immensity and realization that goes with it, just hit me and it is the most remorseful line of dialogue from almost any movie I've ever seen, such is its weight. The subsequent apology making it all the more so.

There's a tragic beauty about it.


"Apologies" nails the emotional content on screen. "No man has a greater friend." Yes, it's all romanticized and that's what great film can do, but the poignancy and honesty of Harry's (Mitchum) sorrow and need to apologize in "their" way only intensifies the emotions we feel, which are muted as well as deeply moving at the same time. Amazing how they were able to achieve this balance.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2012 - 4:37 AM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

I came across this list someone compiled of 1970s-era films of "disillusionment":

http://mubi.com/lists/disillusionment-in-sun-drenched-1970s-american-new-wave-cinema

I was trying to think what other movies could be added to this. Any suggestions?

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2012 - 6:22 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I came across this list someone compiled of 1970s-era films of "disillusionment":

http://mubi.com/lists/disillusionment-in-sun-drenched-1970s-american-new-wave-cinema

I was trying to think what other movies could be added to this. Any suggestions?


That's a whole lot of disillusionment! 268 films!!! Welcome to the '70s!

 
 Posted:   Aug 18, 2012 - 11:14 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

*Possible Spoilers*

I love how "Girl and Tea"--the cue I've been raving about on this thread for the past two years --is reprised in "Apologies." Whereas "Girl and Tea" underscores the budding romance between Richard Jordan and Takakura Ken's daughter, that same lovely cue is used to underscore the deep sense of respect between Mitchum and Ken's character when Mitchum apologizes--not with words, but through a selfless deed. It's amazingly emotional and deeply moving though it's easy to see how such a character interaction might be lost in what is largely thought of as an action film. Or was it? How exactly was The Yazuka marketed back then?

 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2013 - 2:51 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

I came across this list someone compiled of 1970s-era films of "disillusionment":

http://mubi.com/lists/disillusionment-in-sun-drenched-1970s-american-new-wave-cinema

I was trying to think what other movies could be added to this. Any suggestions?


I just suggested "The Nickel Ride" to the writer of this list. That film has all the disillusioning/gritty elements in spades!

Just finished listening again to Grusin's "Yakuza" score. Not in a dark lounge in Tokyo, alas, but it still conjures up its evocative mood even on a summer day in Seattle. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2013 - 5:37 PM   
 By:   jenkwombat   (Member)

My apologies if this has been brought up before (I didn't read all 73 of the previous posts in the thread), but is there any chance of FSM making some more of these? I missed out on this one, unfortunately, and have heard really good things about it....

ADDED: Nevermind, I just saw Lukas's above post. frown

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2013 - 5:45 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

TO JENKWOMBAT-I don't think you have to apologize for not reading 73 comments.Not that there is anything wrong being a martyr.

 
 Posted:   Jun 23, 2013 - 5:52 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I just suggested "The Nickel Ride" to the writer of this list. That film has all the disillusioning/gritty elements in spades!

Just finished listening again to Grusin's "Yakuza" score. Not in a dark lounge in Tokyo, alas, but it still conjures up its evocative mood even on a summer day in Seattle. smile


Mark, you've raved about "The Nickel Ride" in a couple of threads recently and since I've never seen it and you know how much I love "The Friends of Eddie Coyle" and of course, "The Yakuza."

And since Bo Hopkins is in "The Nickel Ride", it is already a good sign. wink

 
 Posted:   Jun 23, 2013 - 10:01 AM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

I certainly recommend it! smile It's more flawed than FRIENDS and YAKUZA, but it has its own gritty and even sentimental charm. (The sentiment only made me cringe once - when someone boisterously tells another character, "I hope you live forever," which is always an obvious ironic foreshadowing.) NICKEL RIDE also makes me wish Jason Miller and the lovely Linda Haynes (the relationship of their characters is the real heart of this movie) had made more films.

And, yes, Bo Hopkins at his most sleazily ingratiating. big grin

 
 Posted:   Jun 23, 2013 - 10:50 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I don't believe I've seen Jason Miller in anything *but* The Exorcist but then his career was sadly short lived. I'm sure his performance in The Nickel Ride will be interesting to watch.

Bo Hopkins was the very best at the charming psych/sociopath shtick and he would do his routine back and forth between film and TV.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 2, 2014 - 7:35 PM   
 By:   Tango Urilla   (Member)

Anyone know where the source cues "Shine On" and "Bluesy Combo" appear in relation to the rest of the score? I wouldn't mind giving The Yakuza another watch in the near future to found out myself, but just wondering if anyone knows offhand for making a chronological playlist.

 
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