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 Posted:   May 26, 2013 - 2:21 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

I seem to recall he was more unhappy with the rushes and demands of the production schedule and dealing with the producers and refused to ever do another Star Trek movie. The actual movie I don't think he had a problem with. Which seems to be a trend with him, didn't he have some kind of falling out with James Cameron?

"Aliens".

Somewhere on Youtube, if it's not been removed, you can find a video of Horner talking about the horrable, rushed experience.

 
 Posted:   May 26, 2013 - 4:51 PM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

YOR remebers very well to see Jerry Goldsmith saying about "The Mummy": "I never understand what that movie point was all about". Or something very similar...

 
 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 12:05 AM   
 By:   musicwizard   (Member)


It's a job, of course, but we're also dealing with ART here, so it is only natural that the artists invest more of their evaluations and feeilngs into the projects, compared with most other "normal" jobs.


That sounds very romantic Thor but I have to disappoint you it still is “just” a job. Sure it’s much more pleasant than working in a factory or office but it’s just a way of making a living at the end of the day. You can’t pay the bills by making ART. You can create art (for the concert hall) in your spare time. All the now so called great compositions by Bach or Mozart were all commissions in fact. If someone hadn’t hired them all this music would never have been written at all! And yes once in a while there were people like Wagner or Tchaikovsky who had the luck that someone else paid for their bills so they could concentrate entirely on their music. Unfortunately most of us just have to give (piano)lessons, play in a band / conduct an orchestra or write / arrange music for film/tv/theatre to make a living instead of creating art for mankind. It’s just like Stephen said, you have good days (=assignments) and bad days like everyone else on this planet.

 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 12:11 AM   
 By:   pete   (Member)

I really wonder about the days John Williams spent watching Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith over and over again without music.

 
 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 1:17 AM   
 By:   ian642002   (Member)

These guys are professionals. They don't have to love a movie to score it.

Think about your own day job. Do you love it? I mean, every day? Probably not. But does that stop you being a professional? Does it stop you trying to do a good job?


Agreed, but then my job wouldn't pay quite so much, nor would it involve collaborating with the kind of talent that might produce something special in an industry full of them, nor - amongst the stuff that possibly pays the bills - does my job involve writing the kind of stuff that may win awards or, if I really hit paydirt, produced one or two works that would stand the test of time and perhaps seal my reputation, or indeed influence others. Nor write stuff that would as come close to art as possible.

I don't love my job, but it gets bills paid. However, it's not film-scoring, which, sometimes, affords some people the luxury of deep, gratifying achievement and the rewards that come with it.

 
 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 2:05 AM   
 By:   ian642002   (Member)

Also, just to bore you with my naïveté, film scoring seems more a job decided by choice rather than necessity. I mean, when we look at the bills we have to pay, you never really think to yourself 'my god, the debt's piling up. Guess I'm going to have to go into film scoring'. It's a 'job' that involves a hell of a lot of groundwork before you can plunge yourself into it. So it is a job where, like us plebeians, a lot decides on how well you do it. But the dimensions of it, and the rewards and reputation that come with it, are huge, wider and more satisfying than turning up at a factory or office and doing the grind. I'm a data project assistant. I will never score a video game or work with William Friedkin.

 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 7:21 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

These guys are professionals. They don't have to love a movie to score it.

Think about your own day job. Do you love it? I mean, every day? Probably not. But does that stop you being a professional? Does it stop you trying to do a good job?

Going back to Barry, he famously hated BORN FREE. And yet it resulted in one of the best loved and most famous movie scores ever. And netted him two Academy Awards.

Cheers


It's a job, of course, but we're also dealing with ART here, so it is only natural that the artists invest more of their evaluations and feeilngs into the projects, compared with most other "normal" jobs.


Hmmm ...

There's an inherent contradiction in this thread. On the one hand, the proposition is that film scoring is a special job in which you have to invest your feelings. But at the same time, we're admiring at all these scores which are great even though the composer didn't have any feelings to invest.

Doesn't one observation kinda demonstrate that the other isn't a truism?

Take someone who works as legal counsel. Do we expect the quality of their legal counsel to be better for clients they like than clients they don't like? Do we think that if a legal counsellor doesn't like their current case, they do it less professionally?

So why would it be different for a film composer?

Yep, I get it that this is art. But professional art. Professional artists may have creative ups and downs, just as a legal counsel might have creative ups and downs. They might hate their current project, just as a legal counsel might. But their success is predicated on the ability to produce art work for money; to be able to show up for work even though they've got that 'Monday' feeling. If they couldn't do that, they wouldn't be in the business.

A friend of mine is a professional script doctor. He doesn't need to love a project to do a professional job of doctoring its script. He just needs to be able to see that he can do some doctoring on its script.

Sometimes I think folks have an overly romantic ideal about what it's like to work in the film business. Admittedly, I don't work in the film business either, so I don't know any better than anybody. I'll just bet it's not this highly romanticized fantasy a lot of people have in their heads.

Cheers

 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 7:52 AM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

It's a job, of course, but we're also dealing with ART here, so it is only natural that the artists invest more of their evaluations and feeilngs into the projects, compared with most other "normal" jobs.

And then you have John Barry scoring Starcrash.

Or Elmer Bernstein doing Robot Monster.

John Williams? Heartbeeps.

John Scott? About half the movies he's done - King Kong Lives, Yor, The People That Time Forgot, Winter People...

That isn't to say the music is bad but to say that the composer saw something "more" than bad Italian scifi, a gorilla with a fishbowl on his head or a less than impressive triceratops killed by Reb Brown... ehhhhhhhhhh.

 
 Posted:   May 27, 2013 - 8:30 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)


It's a job, of course, but we're also dealing with ART here, so it is only natural that the artists invest more of their evaluations and feeilngs into the projects, compared with most other "normal" jobs.


That sounds very romantic Thor but I have to disappoint you it still is “just” a job. Sure it’s much more pleasant than working in a factory or office but it’s just a way of making a living at the end of the day. You can’t pay the bills by making ART. You can create art (for the concert hall) in your spare time. All the now so called great compositions by Bach or Mozart were all commissions in fact. If someone hadn’t hired them all this music would never have been written at all! And yes once in a while there were people like Wagner or Tchaikovsky who had the luck that someone else paid for their bills so they could concentrate entirely on their music. Unfortunately most of us just have to give (piano)lessons, play in a band / conduct an orchestra or write / arrange music for film/tv/theatre to make a living instead of creating art for mankind. It’s just like Stephen said, you have good days (=assignments) and bad days like everyone else on this planet.


There's truth in both statements. I am a graphic artist. I love being creative. Even if I am working on a crappy project, I do the best work I can because the work "I" do on the project, says something about "me"!

The killer is when your boss is overly demanding or take something you did (which was good to begin with) and after the fact tears it apart and in essence "redesigns" it themselves. That is the most disheartening. Not only because the work your presented was good, but because your name is now attached to a piece of crap. There are times you get to work on a project where the boss leaves you alone and trusts your judgement. Those are the most satisfying jobs. smile

 
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