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 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 4:41 AM   
 By:   cirithungol   (Member)

I was tempted to mention the opera scene in Hannibal (featuring Patrick Cassidy's beautiful 'Vide Cor Meum'), but the scene directly after it - in which Dr Lecter presents Pazzi's wife with a gift from the Capponi Library - is equally sublime. 'The Burning Heart' is a mesmerising piece of music and one which actually benefits on the album from the inclusion of Hopkins' lyrical dialogue from the film.

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 4:42 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

Men In Black 1 - the orion's belt moment when the Fiorentino character sees a whole universe on the cat's collar

Speaking of Men in Black:

The great finale where Kay is reunited with his wife, with a wonderful arrangement of Kay's theme from the film, including that solo trumpet around the end. I cut it off at that point, 'cause then we're torn away from that with the alien music.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 5:04 AM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

The entire 'spider' sequence from KRULL (Horner) - represented by two cues, "The Widow's Web" and "The Widow's Lullaby", is a stunning 11 minute suite of music with so many emotions at play, from dissonant terror of the rawest order (with Ligeti-esque blasts of choral dissonance) through celestial awe (the ending of the former track) and pathos-laden nostalgic yearning (the children's choir in the latter cue), to the rapturous recapitulation of the love theme that follows and finally a massive orchestral and choral crescendo that evokes fear and wonder simultaneously. BRILLIANT.

Not only does Horner's music here add tremendous maturity and depth to this sequence (which itself, dodgy stop-motion for the spider aside, is the most original and affecting scene in the film), but it is, compositionally, a true marvel of virtuosic proportions, and a high water mark in Horner's output in my opinion.

I will never understand why this score isn't considered his best EVER. The while damn thing is jsut freaking awesome. It leaves his TREK scores absolutely gasping for air in my opinion (not that I don't think they're great, but... They're no KRULL, that's for sure!).

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 5:08 AM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

The entire 'spider' sequence from KRULL (Horner) - represented by two cues, "The Widow's Web" and "The Widow's Lullaby", is a stunning 11 minute suite of music with so many emotions at play, from dissonant terror of the rawest order (with Ligeti-esque blasts of choral dissonance) through celestial awe (the ending of the former track) and pathos-laden nostalgic yearning (the children's choir in the latter cue), to the rapturous recapitulation of the love theme that follows and finally a massive orchestral and choral crescendo that evokes fear and wonder simultaneously. BRILLIANT.

Not only does Horner's music here add tremendous maturity and depth to this sequence (which itself, dodgy stop-motion for the spider aside, is the most original and affecting scene in the film), but it is, compositionally, a true marvel of virtuosic proportions, and a high water mark in Horner's output in my opinion.

I will never understand why this score isn't considered his best EVER. The while damn thing is jsut freaking awesome. It leaves his TREK scores absolutely gasping for air in my opinion (not that I don't think they're great, but... They're no KRULL, that's for sure!).



"Krull" is Horner's finest score, in YOR's humble opinion!

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 6:48 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

John Glenn's first orbit in The Right Stuff (Starting at the 2:34)



Solium, I've with you buddy -- this was also my choice.

The first segment (2.34 -3.52) is indeed from Mancini's WHITE DAWN (available on Mancini's GODFATHER AND OTHER MOVIE THEMES CD).

The second (4.30 - 5.42) is Bill Conti's, as heard on the Varese CD.


@ Ray Worley and No Respectable Gentleman:

Yes, I became aware the first part was White Dawn after the fact. Interesting enough years later when I bought a Henry Mancini compilation CD!

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B000008I2M/ref=dp_olp_new?ie=UTF8&condition=new

I love both works by Mancini and by Conti.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 6:54 AM   
 By:   robprince   (Member)

Finale from MEET JOE BLACK, Finale from BEN HUR , Act One Finale from THE GREATEST STORY EVER TOLD are high on my list .

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 7:30 AM   
 By:   No Respectable Gentleman   (Member)

John Glenn's first orbit in The Right Stuff (Starting at the 2:34)



Solium, I've with you buddy -- this was also my choice.

The first segment (2.34 -3.52) is indeed from Mancini's WHITE DAWN (available on Mancini's GODFATHER AND OTHER MOVIE THEMES CD).

The second (4.30 - 5.42) is Bill Conti's, as heard on the Varese CD.


@ Ray Worley and No Respectable Gentleman:

Yes, I became aware the first part was White Dawn after the fact. Interesting enough years later when I bought a Henry Mancini compilation CD!

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B000008I2M/ref=dp_olp_new?ie=UTF8&condition=new

I love both works by Mancini and by Conti.


And right on cue:

http://www.blu-ray.com/news/?id=11679

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 7:49 AM   
 By:   barryfan   (Member)

ACROSS THE SEA OF TIME

Two moments:

1. Julia's Theme played at Coney Island

2. Flight over New York

I literally put that in my VCR, yes VCR, and play those scenes over and over when I am feeling very emotional. They work best if you use headphones and block out the rest of the world. I ge5t a lump in my throat every time I watch those two scenes.

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 1:57 PM   
 By:   Josh "Swashbuckler" Gizelt   (Member)

“Farewell” from The Ghost and Mrs. Muir.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 2:11 PM   
 By:   Dr Lenera   (Member)

“Farewell” from The Ghost and Mrs. Muir.

That is certainly a great one. A case where the music accentuates words rather than actions, and brilliantly.

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 2:27 PM   
 By:   BornOfAJackal   (Member)

"Adulation", as Peter O'Toole moves in front of the sun on top of the train car, in LAWRENCE OF ARABIA.

YOR, did you go all "cleaning woman" when someone nominated a "Zimmer Moment"?

The "cleaning woman" reference is from Steve Martin going nuts in DEAD MEN DON'T WEAR PLAID when he hears the phrase "cleaning woman".

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 3:03 PM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

'Journey to Blofeld's Hideaway' from OHMSS by John Barry.

Bond travels by helicopter over the Alps to Piz Gloria. Stunning images, gorgeous music.

Used to be cut out of UK TV showings of the film!!!

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 4:50 PM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

"Adulation", as Peter O'Toole moves in front of the sun on top of the train car, in LAWRENCE OF ARABIA.

YOR, did you go all "cleaning woman" when someone nominated a "Zimmer Moment"?

The "cleaning woman" reference is from Steve Martin going nuts in DEAD MEN DON'T WEAR PLAID when he hears the phrase "cleaning woman".


Nah, YOR is nice people!!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 4:51 PM   
 By:   JamesSouthall   (Member)

Yor, the moment you mention in “Once Upon a Time in America” is among my favorites. I’ll throw in another Morricone: when Jill arrives at the train station in “Once Upon a Time in the West.” That sequence –the celeste quietly chiming (like a delicate pocket watch) as Jill emerges from the train (is it a celeste?) – the sorrowful, melancholic, yet soaring music as Jill enters the station and the camera cranes up higher and higher -- with the music lifting and enveloping us in a sublime experience of another place and another time -- so beautiful it is like an out of body experience -- it never fails to move me.

That's my choice too. I think that film is the best marriage of image and music there's ever been - and that scene the most extraordinary of the lot. Morricone has written many sublime scores - I think he's probably the only genius film music's had, so far - and that's the best of all.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 4:54 PM   
 By:   JamesSouthall   (Member)

So I'll pick the scene where Redford takes Streep up in his airplane in Out Of Africa. When she looks down, she finally really sees the beauty and magnificence of Africa. Barry's music for that scene is perfect and gorgeous. The visuals and music create a perfectly sublime scene.

Great choice too. Magnificent scoring.

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 5:42 PM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

Yor, the moment you mention in “Once Upon a Time in America” is among my favorites. I’ll throw in another Morricone: when Jill arrives at the train station in “Once Upon a Time in the West.” That sequence –the celeste quietly chiming (like a delicate pocket watch) as Jill emerges from the train (is it a celeste?) – the sorrowful, melancholic, yet soaring music as Jill enters the station and the camera cranes up higher and higher -- with the music lifting and enveloping us in a sublime experience of another place and another time -- so beautiful it is like an out of body experience -- it never fails to move me.

That's my choice too. I think that film is the best marriage of image and music there's ever been - and that scene the most extraordinary of the lot. Morricone has written many sublime scores - I think he's probably the only genius film music's had, so far - and that's the best of all.


Agree/partially agree.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 5:49 PM   
 By:   henry   (Member)

The end of ROCKY when Rocky and Adrian hug in the ring.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 6:11 PM   
 By:   RM Eastman   (Member)

I can think of a thousand examples, one sublime moment is Waxman's music in the hair cutting scene in "THE NUN'S STORY"

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 2:40 AM   
 By:   stalemate12   (Member)

Surprised nobody mentioned 'Cinema Paradiso's ending with the wonderful compilation of famous screen kisses to Morricone's beautiful music. Always moves me to tears.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 8:55 AM   
 By:   Mick   (Member)

Los Angeles November 2019 - the opening shots of Bladerunner. Ahh, that haunting, futuristic synth brass.

 
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