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 Posted:   Jul 16, 2013 - 8:27 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

Marie de Nazareth, by Olivier Lliboutry.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2013 - 8:30 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

LAST TANGO IN PARIS-72-GATO BARBIERI

 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2013 - 8:45 PM   
 By:   Wedge   (Member)

THE MASKS OF DEATH by Malcolm Williamson. He was Master of the Queen's Music from 1975 to his death in 2003. This is one of his few film scores, and was for a 1984 TV movie starring Peter Cushing as Sherlock Holmes. It's a great score, but there's never been a soundtrack release that I'm aware of. A vastly stripped-down version of the main theme does appear on Varese's CD "Sherlock Holmes: Classic Themes From 221B Baker Street," but that's it.

 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2013 - 9:06 PM   
 By:   edwzoomom   (Member)

"The French Lieutenant's Woman" - Carl Davis.

Phar Lap - Bruce Rowland

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2013 - 9:12 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

THE GREY FOX-83- MICHAEL CONWAY BAKER

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2013 - 9:40 PM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

"The French Lieutenant's Woman" - Carl Davis.

Phar Lap - Bruce Rowland


Aren't both these guys REALLY prolific in their respective countries? I have at least five or six scores from both of them plus a ton of film music rerecords and concert works from Davis.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2013 - 10:10 PM   
 By:   sherrill50   (Member)

Nick Bic√Ęt's score to 'A Christmas Carol' (1984, with George C. Scott as Scrooge). Absolutely delightful score!

 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2013 - 10:16 PM   
 By:   Zoragoth   (Member)

THE GREY FOX-83- MICHAEL CONWAY BAKER

What a wonderful album and score!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 3:56 AM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

Gotta also add Peter Dasent's HEAVENLY CREATURES. His theme for that film captures the essence of that story SO damn well, and is gorgeous on its own. And after that...?

I've always wondered why certain directors, once they got "big", abandoned their go-to composers from early in their careers...

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 5:07 AM   
 By:   slint   (Member)

For 50s and 60s material, especially European, I find that even if the composer is relatively unknown, very often they recorded in the same studio and the same musicians as more well known composers. I like many soundtracks from these less known composers, but sometimes, I feel that they just do a very good work with the available sounds and techniques. Therefore I choose my items more from the period and style than the composer. It is harder to think of a soundtrack that was both innovative (not just great) and from an non prolific composer.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 5:24 AM   
 By:   Kim Tong   (Member)

LADYHAWKE-83- ANDREW POWELL- Rock artist who came up with a very enjoyable score with this epic.

In my opnion one of the biggest mistake on film music, this inadequate music spoils the movie.


I never understood why so many people think this score was a mistake. This score brought to my attention some of the Alan Parson Project songs just because Powell was incharge of the orchestral parts in those songs. Yes, to have electronics in this type of movie was a different step, but it worked for me. Compared this to dumping Goldsmith to have Tangerine Dream score LEGEND? That was a major mistake! I can play the LADYHAWKE CD over and over, I sold my TD LEGEND CD awhile back.

 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 5:26 AM   
 By:   mark ford   (Member)

Thought of 2 scores by Humphrey Searle: THE HAUNTING and THE ABOMINABLE SNOWMAN. Searle was primarily a concert composer who dabbled in film and TV. Wish he had done more.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 5:31 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

Thought of 2 scores by Humphrey Searle: THE HAUNTING and THE ABOMINABLE SNOWMAN. Searle was primarily a concert composer who dabbled in film and TV. Wish he had done more.

I'm kind of slightly embarrassed that I didn't post this myself. It's most apt that it's you Mark, that remembers.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 5:53 AM   
 By:   Dorian   (Member)

When the Whales Came or Dark of the Sun might not be generally known scores (though I love both), but their composers are hardly "non prolific" in my opinion--just look at the length of their filmographies at IMDB. Same with other composers already mentioned above.

I think Alan Price's THE WHALES OF AUGUST qualifies well.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 7:17 AM   
 By:   vinylscrubber   (Member)

Let me suggest John Veale's score for the 1955 war/survival film, THE PURPLE PLAIN, with Gregory Peck. Veale's haunting effort does much to lift this unusual story of war in Burma and a man's coming back from a personal tragedy through a new love to a higher level. If you've never seen this under-rated gem, definitely seek it out as it weaves a very unique spell upon the viewer, due in no small part to Veale's music.

Veale has only ten features to his credit between 1954 and 1964, with THE PURPLE PLAIN being his most high profile score. Among his few scores, THE SPANISH GARDINER with Dirk Bogarde is one I've been trying to catch up with for years.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 7:30 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

THE GREY FOX-83- MICHAEL CONWAY BAKER

What a wonderful album and score!



I just saw THE GREY FOX a few weeks ago. Good music. A number of cues in the film were composed and performed by the traditional Irish group The Chieftains.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 7:30 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

scrubber - don't quite know what you mean by "trying to catch up with..." regarding THE SPANISH GARDENER. Probably DVD or Blu? Anyway, the whole thing is up on YouTube. I remember the John Veale score from when I was a kid and taped everything off the telly. I've just reacqauinted myself with the Main Titles - very good indeed, with more than a hint of Miklos Rozsa to it.

Not quite sure if I'd really want to have those "non-prolific" composers doing more films. Part of the attraction for me of Peter Schickele, Denny Zeitlin and those one-offs is that their sole venture into cinema produced such brilliant scores. I wouldn't want them going on to do something which might be merely serviceable.

 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 7:31 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

A lot of good ones already mentioned. I'll add Angela Morley- Watership Down.
(Five minutes of recorded music was cut from the film and the score album was almost completely replaced with a song album!)

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 7:39 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

I'll add Angela Morley- Watership Down.
(Five minutes of recorded music was cut from the film and the score album was almost completely replaced with a song album!)



I hadn't noticed that before. The 2003 Polydor CD is markedly different from the original LP and the 1998 Pendulum CD. Newcomers to the score should best stick with the LP, since both CDs are OOP, rare, and costly.

 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 8:02 AM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

The aforementioned Careful, He Might Hear You and Sky Bandits both get my endorsement.

Honorable Mention: While Randy Miller is prolific in terms of work, he's not in terms of album releases. Hellraiser III and Spartacus are spectacular scores though.

 
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