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 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 11:23 AM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

Less than 175 left. Yay!

Bravo, Bruce!

Glad this one is selling well.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 11:42 AM   
 By:   Niall from Ireland   (Member)

Less than 175 left. Yay!

Great! I sent in my order today!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 12:37 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Less than 175 left. Yay!


It sure looks like a fast sell out Bruce! smile

Can't wait to get the cds when ready.

I hope this will encourage more golden age cds, both from Bruce and others! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 12:44 PM   
 By:   ScottDS   (Member)

...and the sixth reissue of some Star Trek score is topping out...

I know that was just an example but, to be fair, it's not like Paramount was always the most license-friendly studio out there.

Nothing like getting a "Sorry, Paramount" reply re: an expanded Trek score while at the same time reading about the umpteenth Star Wars score re-re-release, this time in new Darth Vader packaging!

big grin

And speaking as one of the 80s kids, I may not be familiar with much of Kritzerland's output but I'm ALWAYS paying attention.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2013 - 10:59 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Less than a hundred now.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2013 - 12:44 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....MGM was pretty much tapped out by FSM.....


Hardly. Lukas had barely started on MGM 1930-1940 by the time FSM's
releases were ended.

The Waxman, Kaper, Stothart alone would make quite a few box sets, and
at least one big one that I know of was in the planning stages.

Other composers from MGM in this period that we've had little or nothing from
include Amfitheatrof, Snell, Axt, Ward and others.

In the '50s there is still some Kaper, Deutsch, Salinger, and, of course, Previn.
And there is even a stereo Waxman as yet unreleased.

One of Lukas' problems was the continuing issue, not of available material,
but of buyers of Golden Age material and people who had actually seen some
of the major films. A second problem was the required 3000 pressing demands,
and when he was able to lower that I think some were more successful in their
overall sales.

The final, and probably biggest, problem Lukas had with this material
is that he simply released it. He seemed to be so preoccupied with the overall job
of running the company that he had no time to "sell" the material. It had to sell
itself or not. That worked fine for the older buyers, but the younger ones didn't know or
care what was on the discs and hadn't seen the films or heard of the stars.

One of Bruce Kimmel's biggest achievements, more than any other producer, is that
he "sells" his releases. He is on this board every day, answering questions, talking
up the latest release, telling everyone about it, telling everyone about the musical
quality and the sound, and the mastering, and promoting the composers.

I think his Preminger collection is a prime example of that. To an old-timer like me
these films are well-known, but to younger purchasers, they are very obscure, and
yet Bruce seems to have made them palatable to a wider audience by his enthusiasm
and promotional skills. The other recent example in this regard is the "Secret of the Incas"/ "Far Horizons" double-bill. In their posts, I was shocked at how few people
had ever seen or heard of these two films---but those that have bought this release
now understand how interesting and well-wrought these two scores are.

Over Lukas reign I kept wondering when and how he would tap into the (literally)
hundreds of unreleased scores in the older MGM library. I can count only about 10-12 relatively complete scores he released from MGM's 30s-40s period, so there are many,
many more to be found.....not to mention the many unreleased musicals that will appeal
to some on this board as well as collectors on other boards on the internet, like CastrecL, which deal specifically with musicals.

What has most surprised me by Bruce's comments is that, thus far, he seems to have
made few inroads into this older MGM library. One would think that with Lukas' involvement
in many Kritzerland releases as executive producer and his connective link with Rhino-Warner-Turner, something would have happened to enable this by now.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2013 - 2:45 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Less than a hundred now.


I hope it sells out Bruce! smile

I'm greatly looking forward to it!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2013 - 2:52 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

.....MGM was pretty much tapped out by FSM.....


Hardly. Lukas had barely started on MGM 1930-1940 by the time FSM's
releases were ended.

The Waxman, Kaper, Stothart alone would make quite a few box sets, and
at least one big one that I know of was in the planning stages.

Other composers from MGM in this period that we've had little or nothing from
include Amfitheatrof, Snell, Axt, Ward and others.

In the '50s there is still some Kaper, Deutsch, Salinger, and, of course, Previn.
And there is even a stereo Waxman as yet unreleased.

One of Lukas' problems was the continuing issue, not of available material,
but of buyers of Golden Age material and people who had actually seen some
of the major films. A second problem was the required 3000 pressing demands,
and when he was able to lower that I think some were more successful in their
overall sales.

The final, and probably biggest, problem Lukas had with this material
is that he simply released it. He seemed to be so preoccupied with the overall job
of running the company that he had no time to "sell" the material. It had to sell
itself or not. That worked fine for the older buyers, but the younger ones didn't know or
care what was on the discs and hadn't seen the films or heard of the stars.

One of Bruce Kimmel's biggest achievements, more than any other producer, is that
he "sells" his releases. He is on this board every day, answering questions, talking
up the latest release, telling everyone about it, telling everyone about the musical
quality and the sound, and the mastering, and promoting the composers.

I think his Preminger collection is a prime example of that. To an old-timer like me
these films are well-known, but to younger purchasers, they are very obscure, and
yet Bruce seems to have made them palatable to a wider audience by his enthusiasm
and promotional skills. The other recent example in this regard is the "Secret of the Incas"/ "Far Horizons" double-bill. In their posts, I was shocked at how few people
had ever seen or heard of these two films---but those that have bought this release
now understand how interesting and well-wrought these two scores are.

Over Lukas reign I kept wondering when and how he would tap into the (literally)
hundreds of unreleased scores in the older MGM library. I can count only about 10-12 relatively complete scores he released from MGM's 30s-40s period, so there are many,
many more to be found.....not to mention the many unreleased musicals that will appeal
to some on this board as well as collectors on other boards on the internet, like CastrecL, which deal specifically with musicals.

What has most surprised me by Bruce's comments is that, thus far, he seems to have
made few inroads into this older MGM library. One would think that with Lukas' involvement
in many Kritzerland releases as executive producer and his connective link with Rhino-Warner-Turner, something would have happened to enable this by now.




Great post Manderley. I seem to agree with everything you say! smile

I too would like to see some more MGM golden age cds starting with Waxman's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2013 - 3:08 PM   
 By:   georgefenton   (Member)

I too would like to see some more MGM golden age cds starting with Waxman's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde


Yes, please....Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: A MASTERPIECE of Franz Waxman!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2013 - 3:17 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Only time I've ever ordered a CD of unfamiliar music without even listening to the samples. The time period combined with Raksin involvement guarantees a good listen. And you can't beat the price.

I'll let you know if I feel otherwise, with an open letter to Kritzerland.

JBF. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2013 - 3:34 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Only time I've ever ordered a CD of unfamiliar music without even listening to the samples. The time period combined with Raksin involvement guarantees a good listen. And you can't beat the price.

I'll let you know if I feel otherwise, with an open letter to Kritzerland.

JBF. wink




Onyabirri, you are cracking me up! smile

Please, no more "open letters." smile

PS: I'm sure you will like the film noir box.

 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2013 - 4:26 PM   
 By:   davel   (Member)

You'll let us know when the interview's posted, right Bruce?

It's unfortunate your recent releases haven't grabbed me. I picked up Strange Love of Martha Ivers, but nothing since - and I really want more from this period to catch me off-guard! Hopefully something upcoming will do the trick. Either way, it's great you've found this groove. Please keep them coming.


If Laura, A Place in the Sun, the Waxman set, Suzie Wong, and the others we've done since Martha haven't grabbed you, I don't know that we'll have anything that will smile I mean, we've only done some of the greatest film music ever written so I'm not sure what it takes to grab you - maybe we'll get lucky, though smile


All wonderful scores! Maybe not the greatest scores, but all great golden age scores, dare I say better than most of what's written today.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2013 - 4:52 PM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

.....MGM was pretty much tapped out by FSM.....


Hardly. Lukas had barely started on MGM 1930-1940 by the time FSM's
releases were ended.

The Waxman, Kaper, Stothart alone would make quite a few box sets, and
at least one big one that I know of was in the planning stages.

Other composers from MGM in this period that we've had little or nothing from
include Amfitheatrof, Snell, Axt, Ward and others.

In the '50s there is still some Kaper, Deutsch, Salinger, and, of course, Previn.
And there is even a stereo Waxman as yet unreleased.

One of Lukas' problems was the continuing issue, not of available material,
but of buyers of Golden Age material and people who had actually seen some
of the major films. A second problem was the required 3000 pressing demands,
and when he was able to lower that I think some were more successful in their
overall sales.

The final, and probably biggest, problem Lukas had with this material
is that he simply released it. He seemed to be so preoccupied with the overall job
of running the company that he had no time to "sell" the material. It had to sell
itself or not. That worked fine for the older buyers, but the younger ones didn't know or
care what was on the discs and hadn't seen the films or heard of the stars.

One of Bruce Kimmel's biggest achievements, more than any other producer, is that
he "sells" his releases. He is on this board every day, answering questions, talking
up the latest release, telling everyone about it, telling everyone about the musical
quality and the sound, and the mastering, and promoting the composers.

I think his Preminger collection is a prime example of that. To an old-timer like me
these films are well-known, but to younger purchasers, they are very obscure, and
yet Bruce seems to have made them palatable to a wider audience by his enthusiasm
and promotional skills. The other recent example in this regard is the "Secret of the Incas"/ "Far Horizons" double-bill. In their posts, I was shocked at how few people
had ever seen or heard of these two films---but those that have bought this release
now understand how interesting and well-wrought these two scores are.

Over Lukas reign I kept wondering when and how he would tap into the (literally)
hundreds of unreleased scores in the older MGM library. I can count only about 10-12 relatively complete scores he released from MGM's 30s-40s period, so there are many,
many more to be found.....not to mention the many unreleased musicals that will appeal
to some on this board as well as collectors on other boards on the internet, like CastrecL, which deal specifically with musicals.

What has most surprised me by Bruce's comments is that, thus far, he seems to have
made few inroads into this older MGM library. One would think that with Lukas' involvement
in many Kritzerland releases as executive producer and his connective link with Rhino-Warner-Turner, something would have happened to enable this by now.


Was not part of the decision to cease FSM, among others, a corporate change in the Warner/ Turner/ Rhino situation? I notice that the few recent "classic MGM" release's, for example NORTH BY NORTHWEST (re-master) and the BEN HUR set carried the Warner Watertower logo and not the old Turner/Warner logo.

It is true that FSM barely scratched The classic MGM surface. I hope one of our favorite labels can return to this treasure trove.

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2013 - 2:30 PM   
 By:   Olivier   (Member)

Less than a hundred now.

Darn time I got around to ordering this razz Done. smile

Saint Joan is splendid; thanks for the special offer, Bruce!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2013 - 6:35 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Last fifty. Speak now or miss out on some GREAT music.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2013 - 12:36 PM   
 By:   Eugene Iemola   (Member)

Fifty. Minus one.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 7, 2013 - 11:23 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

What, no one has guessed our next title?

 
 Posted:   Aug 7, 2013 - 11:31 AM   
 By:   mildcigar   (Member)

What, no one has guessed our next title?

Moonraker [1979] ?

 
 Posted:   Aug 7, 2013 - 11:36 AM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

One of the two other Goldsmiths you've got in the works? Roy Webb's Sinbad the Sailor?

Yavar

P.S. While I'm wishing out loud...Jeff Alexander's Support Your Local Sheriff! (seriously, it's a great score for a great movie)

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 7, 2013 - 11:45 AM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

Could it be something from one these four composers:
Elmer Bernstein
Victor Young
Alfred Newman
Franz Waxman ????

 
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