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 Posted:   Dec 10, 2012 - 8:48 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I'm going to keep the listing above as '3', as I don't want to include the duplicate ALCOA episodes. If any more or less original scores pop up, I'll edit it accordingly.

 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2012 - 9:36 AM   
 By:   Jeff Eldridge   (Member)


If I may ask, can you tell us please which episode is this?
By the way, in the above link, I counted 8 episodes of 1963 that say that they were original premiered in Alcoa Premiere..
(5-10, 12, 14)
I guess they missed one..


These ALCOA PREMIERE episodes were repeated on KRAFT MYSTERY:

The Rules of the Game
The Fugitive Eye
The Fortress
Of Struggle and Flight
The Boy Who Wasn't Wanted
The Dark Labyrinth
The Hour of the Bath
Ordeal in Darkness
Pattern of Guilt

Rugolo and Stevens scored "Of Struggle and Flight."

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2012 - 9:46 AM   
 By:   jonnyquest   (Member)

This is a topic of great interest to me and many others, Thor. Thanks for keeping it alive. I enjoy everyone's musings on the subject. All Johnny's early-era stuff is fascinating and wonderful to me, but I'm especially intrigued by the TV dramas and thrillers (perhaps a bit more than the early "sex comedies"). Based on scores like Nightwatch, Checkmate and the material on FSM's great Omnibus set, (as well as the many youtube clips) there's still so much top-notch Williams worthy of discovery. The Secret Ways, though not a TV film, is definitely a highlight of this period, too. (I've commented on its own thread as well). Any of this material (for me, anyway) could stand proudly beside the Irwin Allen stuff we all know and love. Because my first encounter, (as a kid) with JW was Lost In Space and the Irwin Allen disaster features, I've always been especially fond of that astringent, economical and very striking style.

For that matter, the original Star Wars score (especially the first half of the film) has much of that crisp, less-operatic sound to it. It's probably why I've always loved the 1977 score the most (of the "original trilogy"). I can't be the only one who hears a lot of early Williams in 77's Star Wars, and for me it's the ultimate fusing of his tighter early sound with his then-still-emerging, more opulent style. (Inferno, Midway and Black Sunday being other examples). As magnificent as "Empire" was/is, I recall straining to hear some of that great, early Williams "TV sound" that infused the Tatooine, Mos Eisley and some of the Death Star sequences. He had pretty much evolved out of the style by then. As much as I adore just about everything Williams ever wrote, I still feel a little stylistic disconnect that the "fusion" sound of the first Star Wars film was pretty much restricted to that picture only. Perhaps that's a good thing; no one would argue it's the most stand-alone film in the saga, so it's fitting that the unique grittiness to the movie itself (and its music) are sort of their own thing.

Anyhow, sorry to digress. But I love that earlier TV style so much, it's fun exploring how and where it evolved.

Anyhow, my Spidey sense tells me that somehow, we'll eventually enjoy more surprising, dynamic releases like "Nightwatch". Until then, it's fun following the archaeological work you guys are doing here.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2012 - 11:00 AM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)


If I may ask, can you tell us please which episode is this?
By the way, in the above link, I counted 8 episodes of 1963 that say that they were original premiered in Alcoa Premiere..
(5-10, 12, 14)
I guess they missed one..


These ALCOA PREMIERE episodes were repeated on KRAFT MYSTERY:

The Rules of the Game
The Fugitive Eye
The Fortress
Of Struggle and Flight
The Boy Who Wasn't Wanted
The Dark Labyrinth
The Hour of the Bath
Ordeal in Darkness
Pattern of Guilt

Rugolo and Stevens scored "Of Struggle and Flight."


Thank you very much!
Apparently they forgot to mention it in "The Rules of the Game" in that site, which looks very informed nevertheles..

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2013 - 5:29 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I have edited the first post with some new information, including links to the threads where we discuss said shows in more detail.

My goal is to have this thread as a resource, in a way, as we try to dig deeper and deeper through the Williams TV jungle. I'll add more threads about the shows that don't really have any yet as the research moves on.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2013 - 12:23 PM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)

In a French book about John Williams, it includes in his TV filmography among the other knowns:

1967 - Code Name: Heraclitus (TV film version from an episode of Chrysler Theater)

Does anyone know anything about it? Imdb lists Mandel as the composer..
I wonder where did the author find this information..

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2013 - 12:27 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

In a French book about John Williams, it includes in his TV filmography among the other knowns:

1967 - Code Name: Heraclitus (TV film version from an episode of Chrysler Theater)

Does anyone know anything about it? Imdb lists Mandel as the composer..
I wonder where did the author find this information..


IMDB isn't quite up to par on these ol' TV things. They also listed Goldsmith as the composer of the episode "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch" from the same show, but that was a Williams score.

So yeah....I don't see why he can't have composed the music to that episode. I'm curious about the "TV film version" bit, though. I wasn't aware that there had been any TV film adaptations of the CHRYSLER episodes.

So far, I've only been able to identify TWO CHRYSLER episodes with Williams music. There's supposed to be a handful more.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2013 - 12:34 PM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)

Also, I just saw it lists one episode from CBS Playhouse (season 2, episode 2: Saturday Adoption - 1968).
I just checked with imdb, and it has it too.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0445698/fullcredits#cast
Though we don't know if it's correct.

about the chrysler episodes: you mean the 2 you had mentioned? war of nerves and life of ivan something?
The book lists these too:
The Crime
The Sister and the Savage

(edit: Oh, I see they are mentioned in the seperate thread about the series)

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2013 - 12:39 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Yeah, I meant those two.

CBS PLAYHOUSE?!? I assume that's something other than PLAYHOUSE 90?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2013 - 2:21 PM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)

Yeah, I meant those two.

CBS PLAYHOUSE?!? I assume that's something other than PLAYHOUSE 90?


yes. It's this series here, starting in1967.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0831400/

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2013 - 2:34 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

OK, I'll add it to the list, even though it isn't 100% confirmed yet.

It makes sense that Williams would have scored the episode you mentioned, since Delbert Mann directed it. As you know, they've worked together on numerous occasions.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2013 - 2:43 PM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)

OK, I'll add it to the list, even though it isn't 100% confirmed yet.

It makes sense that Williams would have scored the episode you mentioned, since Delbert Mann directed it. As you know, they've worked together on numerous occasions.


oh, yes probably. I see they did Heidi too that year.
So maybe Williams scored also the Mann directed episodes of "Playhouse 90".
Although i saw some end credits on youtube for some episodes and either they don't have any credit for music, or they have for music supervision.

 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2013 - 5:03 PM   
 By:   Jeff Eldridge   (Member)

Do either of you ever read my liner notes? See the booklet for the LLL release of Jane Eyre for info on the "Saturday Adoption" installment of CBS Playhouse.

That being said...I stated in the Jane Eyre notes that Williams had scored "Saturday Adoption" based on information from Variety and Billboard, among other sources. The Billboard item:



appeared mere days before the show aired and reported that Williams had scored it.

Unfortunately, at the time I submitted the Jane Eyre notes, I had not actually seen "Saturday Adoption," but a few months ago when I watched it at UCLA, it turned out that there is no composition credit on "Saturday Adoption," only a music editing credit. Furthermore, the music in the show (scored for a small ensemble) sounds nothing like anything Williams was writing at the time (or ever, for that matter). That and the way the music was used (very sparingly, and fading in and out to cover scene changes) led me to think that it may have been tracked in from another CBS Playhouse episode. Although what actually happened here is unclear at the moment (to me, anyway), the available evidence now suggests Williams did not compose music for this program.

On top of that, "Saturday Adoption" was pretty much a boring a stage play shot on videotape in black and white. The only thing that made the trip to the UCLA library not a complete waste of time was the arresting CBS Playhouse theme music composed by Aaron Copland.

So, my apologies to LLL and the people who actually read the Jane Eyre notes for the possible inaccuracy contained therein with respect to Williams' involvement with "Saturday Adoption."

P.S. CBS Playhouse aired many years after Playhouse 90 ended and they weren't related other than they both aired on CBS and had "Playhouse" in the title.

P.P.S. Code Name: Heraclitus was a theatrical release of a two-part Chrysler Theatre episode. Williams did not score it.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2013 - 5:16 PM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)

Thank you very much for the info..
I myself didn't buy the LLL Jane Eyre, since I already had the Silva Screen one, so I couldn't have read about this..

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 11, 2013 - 2:22 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Thank you very much for the info..
I myself didn't buy the LLL Jane Eyre, since I already had the Silva Screen one, so I couldn't have read about this..


Same here. I don't generally buy expansions of what I consider perfectly fine soundtracks. If there was any way to download just the liner notes, however, I would. I always read your stuff, Jeff.

But thanks for the info. Illuminating. Guess I have to remove it from the list again.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 11, 2013 - 2:33 AM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)

Thank you very much for the info..
I myself didn't buy the LLL Jane Eyre, since I already had the Silva Screen one, so I couldn't have read about this..


Same here. I don't generally buy expansions of what I consider perfectly fine soundtracks.


The LLL release is NOT an expansion. It's a reissue with remastered sound.

Yes, I hope too, liner notes were downloadable for us who don't buy all releases, or missed others..

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 11, 2013 - 2:37 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Thank you very much for the info..
I myself didn't buy the LLL Jane Eyre, since I already had the Silva Screen one, so I couldn't have read about this..


Same here. I don't generally buy expansions of what I consider perfectly fine soundtracks.


The LLL release is NOT an expansion. It's a reissue with remastered sound.


Ah, that's true. Still, I'm pleased with the Silva for the time being. Maybe I'll "upgrade" down the road.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2013 - 5:37 PM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)

Ok, just found something again:

here you can preview many pages from a book about music in science fiction television, and there is a chapter about Williams + Lost in Space (page 37 and on):

http://books.google.gr/books?id=hNpNH4VMSlUC&printsec=frontcover&dq=music+in+science+fiction+television&hl=el&sa=X&ei=-V_zUO79DOKR0QWc2ICoAQ&ved=0CC4Q6AEwAA

the interesting thing , and probably a false statement again, is that it says (on page 38) that Williams had scored 3 episodes for Johnny Staccato in 1960, and this led to underscores of 29 episodes of Mr. Lucky (1959-1960).
I thought Williams was just a performer in those shows.
Or maybe there is a trace of thruth in the above statements, meaning that Williams played his own little tunes and improvisations on piano?

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2013 - 10:07 PM   
 By:   Jeff Eldridge   (Member)

Or, the better explanation would be that the article in question is sloppily researched, given that it lists 1962 as a date for Williams scoring Checkmate when he actually scored the 1960-61 season plus a handful of episodes during the fall of 1961.

 
 
 Posted:   May 21, 2013 - 1:44 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I've updated the first post a bit, but if any of you hardcore JW buffs find something wrong there, please let me know. Or if you have more info to add.

 
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