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 Posted:   Mar 29, 2011 - 5:56 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

We've done quite a few all-color booklets - when we have great color material we try to do it. Carrie, Casino Royale, A Bridge Too Far, The Unforgiven/The Way West, It's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, Bananas/Sex, Taras Bulba, Tom Jones, Anya, Scent of Mystery, Une Chambre En Ville, all have full color booklets. smile

Ah, then it's probably because I always tend to read the duplicate pdf notes you provide on your site before the CD arrives and neglect to look at the actual booklet versions properly!


smile

Sometimes it's really kind of shocking what we're given to use (and not in a good way) - and on a couple of titles we're prepping there was nothing at all - so we had to go find stuff and then I donate it back to the studio so they DO have something. Luckily, on one of the upcoming titles, it's a film I've been a huge fan of for many years and from my collecting days I still had a ton of stills and poster material on it.



Hi Bruce:

I'm avidly looking forward to TRAITOR, which has been ordered with a group of other new releases. I love that score.

What is the possibility of an extended WAR AND PEACE? It was a Paramount film, but Columbia released the original soundtrack excerpts on lp, which Varese later released on CD.

Was that originally recorded by composer Nino Rota in Italy? I suspect so. So there may be nothing in the Paramount vaults.

Still, no harm in asking. It's a wonderful score.

Thanks,
John


I really doubt they have elements on that - and there are also complications when there was an LP release.

 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2011 - 6:21 PM   
 By:   Frank DeWald   (Member)

Unless something is worked out with whomever owns the album rights, it's a difficult road with Anne Frank.

I have listened to this amazing Newman score three times in the last two days! Fortunately for us ANNE FRANK fans, there's a lot of similar material in this score, which Bruce has made available in such stunning sound! Thank you, Bruce. This is an absolute must for all Golden Age fans!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2011 - 9:12 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Unless something is worked out with whomever owns the album rights, it's a difficult road with Anne Frank.

I have listened to this amazing Newman score three times in the last two days! Fortunately for us ANNE FRANK fans, there's a lot of similar material in this score, which Bruce has made available in such stunning sound! Thank you, Bruce. This is an absolute must for all Golden Age fans!


Yes, but where are these Golden Age fans? We NEED them!

 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2011 - 9:15 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

Unless something is worked out with whomever owns the album rights, it's a difficult road with Anne Frank.

I have listened to this amazing Newman score three times in the last two days! Fortunately for us ANNE FRANK fans, there's a lot of similar material in this score, which Bruce has made available in such stunning sound! Thank you, Bruce. This is an absolute must for all Golden Age fans!


Yes, but where are these Golden Age fans? We NEED them!


We are out here.

 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2011 - 9:21 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

Bruce , I just loved this CD. I hope it was not a disappointment to you as far as sales are concerned. I love the music of the "masters" and I know you do also.

I'm occasionally dismayed only by the fact that so many of today's collectors just pass stuff like this by - I do understand that the stuff they grew up with (80s and 90s) is what they love, no matter how icky the music and films may be to others - even ten years ago this would have sold much better - I was warned up front "Alfred Newman doesn't sell" - for those of us who love Newman we simply don't want to hear it. Putting it out is not a disappointment in any way - it's one of my favorite Newman scores to a film I love and if it's a loss leader then so be it. It's sad, and I really will have to now judge each of these older titles much more carefully because I can't have too many of these - we have about five hundred left, which, as I said, is just dismaying. Hopefully, as people post and word circulates about how terrific this is, and maybe when the spate of 80s and 90s stuff abates a bit, then maybe some others will take a chance and discover just how great Mr. Newman is and how perfect this score is.


What makes me sad is that this reduces the chance for a release of the OST for NEVADA SMITH.

I've talked with mutual enthusiasts about the lack of interest in grand scores of vintage- we were all chomping at the bit for them 30 years ago. Tempus Fuggit.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2011 - 10:36 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Tempus is a wonderful composer - would there be interest in his scores?

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2011 - 11:56 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

Yes Bruce it's not just most of the scores from the movies of today that are "dreck" its the movies themselves. You have to wait until Fall and the Xmas season to see anything of merit. A good story is prefered by me, rather than special effects. By the way, I thought the score to UP was sensational. Thank you, Mr.Giacchino. There are exceptions.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2011 - 8:16 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Yes Bruce it's not just most of the scores from the movies of today that are "dreck" its the movies themselves. You have to wait until Fall and the Xmas season to see anything of merit. A good story is prefered by me, rather than special effects. By the way, I thought the score to UP was sensational. Thank you, Mr.Giacchino. There are exceptions.

I agree about Up, a very nice score to a wonderful movie. Pixar seems to know how to do these things. In the last couple of years, there have at least been movies that I've thought were pretty good, but they are very few and very far between.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2011 - 8:36 AM   
 By:   paul rossen   (Member)

Bruce , I just loved this CD. I hope it was not a disappointment to you as far as sales are concerned. I love the music of the "masters" and I know you do also.

I'm occasionally dismayed only by the fact that so many of today's collectors just pass stuff like this by - I do understand that the stuff they grew up with (80s and 90s) is what they love, no matter how icky the music and films may be to others - even ten years ago this would have sold much better - I was warned up front "Alfred Newman doesn't sell" - for those of us who love Newman we simply don't want to hear it. Putting it out is not a disappointment in any way - it's one of my favorite Newman scores to a film I love and if it's a loss leader then so be it. It's sad, and I really will have to now judge each of these older titles much more carefully because I can't have too many of these - we have about five hundred left, which, as I said, is just dismaying. Hopefully, as people post and word circulates about how terrific this is, and maybe when the spate of 80s and 90s stuff abates a bit, then maybe some others will take a chance and discover just how great Mr. Newman is and how perfect this score is.


This is not good for us Golden Era fans. With such older titles is it possible to limit production to say 1000 and still make it feasible? I shudder to think how many copies of the new Counterpoint release of Waxman's Sunset Blvd sold. This may account for the delay of their second release. I too hope that one day Newman's Airport as well as Nevada Smith are released as well as a number of classic Bernstein scores such as Sons of Katie Elder.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2011 - 9:07 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Bruce , I just loved this CD. I hope it was not a disappointment to you as far as sales are concerned. I love the music of the "masters" and I know you do also.

I'm occasionally dismayed only by the fact that so many of today's collectors just pass stuff like this by - I do understand that the stuff they grew up with (80s and 90s) is what they love, no matter how icky the music and films may be to others - even ten years ago this would have sold much better - I was warned up front "Alfred Newman doesn't sell" - for those of us who love Newman we simply don't want to hear it. Putting it out is not a disappointment in any way - it's one of my favorite Newman scores to a film I love and if it's a loss leader then so be it. It's sad, and I really will have to now judge each of these older titles much more carefully because I can't have too many of these - we have about five hundred left, which, as I said, is just dismaying. Hopefully, as people post and word circulates about how terrific this is, and maybe when the spate of 80s and 90s stuff abates a bit, then maybe some others will take a chance and discover just how great Mr. Newman is and how perfect this score is.


This is not good for us Golden Era fans. With such older titles is it possible to limit production to say 1000 and still make it feasible? I shudder to think how many copies of the new Counterpoint release of Waxman's Sunset Blvd sold. This may account for the delay of their second release. I too hope that one day Newman's Airport as well as Nevada Smith are released as well as a number of classic Bernstein scores such as Sons of Katie Elder.


The bottom line number on the Paramount titles is 1500 - there's just no way to come out of it below that number. And even at that number, the profit to be made is slight - unless it's some Goldsmith or some 80s or 90s score that can actually sell 2000 or 3000, we're doing these for love, not profit.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2011 - 9:09 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)



This is not good for us Golden Era fans. With such older titles is it possible to limit production to say 1000 and still make it feasible? I shudder to think how many copies of the new Counterpoint release of Waxman's Sunset Blvd sold. This may account for the delay of their second release. I too hope that one day Newman's Airport as well as Nevada Smith are released as well as a number of classic Bernstein scores such as Sons of Katie Elder.


Airport has been asked for many times over the years, but if the original tracks were released (& it could well be in the works), I wonder how many copies. I'd have thought no more that 2000 (1500?), & the same with The Diary Of Anne Frank.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2011 - 1:14 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)



This is not good for us Golden Era fans. With such older titles is it possible to limit production to say 1000 and still make it feasible? I shudder to think how many copies of the new Counterpoint release of Waxman's Sunset Blvd sold. This may account for the delay of their second release. I too hope that one day Newman's Airport as well as Nevada Smith are released as well as a number of classic Bernstein scores such as Sons of Katie Elder.


Airport has been asked for many times over the years, but if the original tracks were released (& it could well be in the works), I wonder how many copies. I'd have thought no more that 2000 (1500?), & the same with The Diary Of Anne Frank.


I suppose those two scores reach out to a wider audience, so maybe they'd do better than Traitor. The good news is that this very day saw several orders, including one nice-sized dealer order. And we inch forward and as long as that's the case, I'm fine.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2011 - 2:45 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Hi Bruce, I really appreciate the Newman CD. I've been buying golden age music since 1964, wish there were more of us. Please issue golden age CDs best you can. I'm surprised no one has done SHANE by now. Sure would love Nevada Smith complete. Thanks!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2011 - 3:04 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Hi Bruce, I really appreciate the Newman CD. I've been buying golden age music since 1964, wish there were more of us. Please issue golden age CDs best you can. I'm surprised no one has done SHANE by now. Sure would love Nevada Smith complete. Thanks!

The elements situation on 50s Paramounts is occasionally problematic. Sometimes they're there, sometimes not. As long as they don't put us in financial danger, I'll keep trying to do them.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2011 - 3:14 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Thanks for your reply Bruce. And thanks again for all your great work. I'm enjoying Counterfeit Traitor, Tin Star, Fear Strikes Out, One-Eyed Jacks, Girl Named Tamiko, Love with the Proper Stranger etc. Don't forget the golden age fans! ........... Peter

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2011 - 9:07 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Thanks for your reply Bruce. And thanks again for all your great work. I'm enjoying Counterfeit Traitor, Tin Star, Fear Strikes Out, One-Eyed Jacks, Girl Named Tamiko, Love with the Proper Stranger etc. Don't forget the golden age fans! ........... Peter

I really can't forget the Golden Age fans, since I'm one myself. The funny thing is that when I began collecting soundtracks I wasn't just interested in stuff from when I was a kid or that was current - I loved hearing the older stuff and avidly sought it out. For some (not all) of today's film music collectors, the old part just isn't interesting unless it's a composer who was still writing when they came of age.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 1, 2011 - 3:40 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

..... The funny thing is that when I began collecting soundtracks I wasn't just interested in stuff from when I was a kid or that was current - I loved hearing the older stuff and avidly sought it out. For some (not all) of today's film music collectors, the old part just isn't interesting unless it's a composer who was still writing when they came of age.....


I'm not sure you've thought about or presented your claim as clearly as you should, Mr. Bruce.

I'm guessing that you are about 10 years younger than I, and I'm guessing that when YOU began collecting, nearly all of the older MAJOR Golden Age composers were still writing for films, with the possible exception of Herbert Stothart and Victor Young, who had died.

If you were looking back to the composers earlier than that, like William Axt, Hugo Riesenfeld, David Mendoza, Louis Silvers, or even slightly later ones, like David Snell, Edward Ward, Werner Heymann, among others---you found, like I did, precious little or nothing to collect on most of them. Oh yes, an occasional theme in an LP set or a bootleg lp from a set of Vitaphone discs or acetates would slip through, but otherwise there was not much out there in the marketplace to collect.

As I get older today, I realize that what I am interested in represents a pretty slim market for sellers of CDs, but I have also come to realize that this probably happens in every generation.

If I were to issue a warning, I would tell all the young whippersnappers that one day they will be old, and the composers and music that they idolize now will be very out-of-fashion and forgotten by the newer and younger collectors and fans around them. They will be shocked by this and they will be out in the cold with their idols.

For myself, I find it unbelievable that once tremendously important film composers, like Steiner and Newman and Friedhofer and Young, for example, are not particularly worshipped by most younger listeners---they were once so revered. But that's the way of the world, and I've come to accept that, even while I listen to the Desplats and Giacchinos and Horners and Zimmers.

I would say to our younger filmmusic fans to buy and enjoy what you love now, but save a good copy and machine for listening 50 years from now when it won't be so available---if at all---and you'll be lonely to hear those old familiar melodies you once loved.

Thank heavens today for the likes of Messrs. Kimmel, Kendall, Redman, Spaulding, Stromberg, Morgan, and all of the others who still take flyers on the Golden Age material---if just at 1000 print runs.

I'm selfish enough to hope they can still keep it up---at least 'til I die!


Thanks for THE COUNTERFEIT TRAITOR, Mr. Bruce. It's Fabulous!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 2, 2011 - 10:35 AM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

I agree with you Bruce and Manderley 100%.

I was born in 1946, first noticed film scores in the mid 1950s. In fact, in 1956 my older brother Joe bought Young's Around the World in 80 Days and shortly later Rodgers' Slaughter on 10th Avenue.

I started buying soundtrack LPs in 1964. In 1966 I started to tape off TV with a reel-to-reel recorder many scores. This was all you could do back then.

I never dreamed over 50 years later I would get so many golden age scores on great sounding CDs with booklets too.

Like you said Bruce, while I started with 1950s scores, I quickly went to the scores of the 30s and 40s too.

We are lucky to have you Bruce, along with Lukas, Doug, Roger, Nick, Craig, John & Bill, etc.

Please continue with the golden age CDs best you can! ............. Peter

 
 Posted:   Apr 2, 2011 - 8:55 PM   
 By:   davel   (Member)

Yes, but where are these Golden Age fans? We NEED them!

I quickly ordered mine and I'm patiently waiting (it usually takes 2 or 3 weeks to arrive in Canada) for it. With all the positive reviews in this post the anticipation is acute. Even though I was in my teens in the 60s, my favourite decades for film music have always been from the 40s through the early 70s, so if you use 50 years for the Golden Age then most of what I like qualifies. In this new era of downloading I don't know how long it will be feasible to print CDs but I'll keep buying because not only do I love the music but I also like the physical package and reading the booklets. So, thanks for doing what you do. It's appreciated. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2011 - 8:29 AM   
 By:   Chris90   (Member)

Hey guys I'm new to the forum and want to start right away:
Marvellous release from Kritzerland!!! A great Newman. It sounds so fresh and lush. Can't stop listening to it. There should be more music released from Good Ol' Al!

I watched the film yesterday and noticed that the main tiltle says that Edward B. Powell was in charge of the orchestrations on Counterfeit Traitor.

That's odd because the CD's liner notes state that orchestrations were done by Leo Shuken and Jack Hayes who worked predominently with Newman in the 60s. Powell worked with Newman at Fox until 1959. In the liner notes from FSM's 'The Best of Everything' Lukas wrote: "For whatever reason [...] Newman and Powell had a falling-out following Newman's penultimate film at Fox, 'The Diary of Anne Frank' (1959). Except for portions of Paramount's 1961 musical, 'The Pleasure of His Company', the two would not work together again."

So why did Paramount chose to give Powell the credit instead of Shuken and Hayes?

 
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