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 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 7:41 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

Very pleased to see that.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 8:52 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)


A LOT on the Fox Plate?

I'm normally a light eater, in this case I'll overindulge! smile

 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2013 - 4:27 AM   
 By:   Grimsdyke   (Member)

With todays equipment the sound of FANTASTIC VOYAGE could surely be improved !!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2013 - 7:50 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

I think a lot of it is that we like what we grew up with, & what you liked in your teens & twenties stays with you for life. I was lucky enough to be born in 1950, so had all those 60's films, & on the telly (in the UK) it was all 30's 40's & 50's movies.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2013 - 8:42 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Even though Golden Age scores were not my favorites when I started collecting, so a part of me relates to some of these nubies, I soon learned a couple things. As many a composer has said many a time, these are the giants of film music on whose shoulders newer ones stand. This isn't just lip service, any one with half an ear can find the lineage of a sound or technique starting with those pioneers. Second, and the most important thing I learned, is that when an 80s score is not released one year it is most likely they might get to it the next year or the next one after that. When a Golden Age score isn't released there is a higher chance it is slowly disintegrating somewhere. So when a Golden Age score is released by Kritzerland, LaLaLand, Intrada, Varese, SAE, MMM or anyone, it isn't just a release, it is being saved and I practically get down on my knees to thank them. There are scores that have been lost to the ages and a few of those are probably unheralded classics. So when I hear what amounts to "let them rot!" my blood boils and I side with many a prejudiced Golden Age fan. If only because if I suddenly change my mind about a composer whose works have been lost, it will be too late.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2013 - 12:43 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Even though Golden Age scores were not my favorites when I started collecting, so a part of me relates to some of these nubies, I soon learned a couple things. As many a composer has said many a time, these are the giants of film music on whose shoulders newer ones stand. This isn't just lip service, any one with half an ear can find the lineage of a sound or technique starting with those pioneers. Second, and the most important thing I learned, is that when an 80s score is not released one year it is most likely they might get to it the next year or the next one after that. When a Golden Age score isn't released there is a higher chance it is slowly disintegrating somewhere. So when a Golden Age score is released by Kritzerland, LaLaLand, Intrada, Varese, SAE, MMM or anyone, it isn't just a release, it is being saved and I practically get down on my knees to thank them. There are scores that have been lost to the ages and a few of those are probably unheralded classics. So when I hear what amounts to "let them rot!" my blood boils and I side with many a prejudiced Golden Age fan. If only because if I suddenly change my mind about a composer whose works have been lost, it will be too late.



"Golden Age scores released by Kritzerland, LaLaLand, Intrada, Varese, SAE, MMM or anyone"


VARESE? Hmmmm ........ eek

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2013 - 2:44 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Even though Golden Age scores were not my favorites when I started collecting, so a part of me relates to some of these nubies, I soon learned a couple things. As many a composer has said many a time, these are the giants of film music on whose shoulders newer ones stand. This isn't just lip service, any one with half an ear can find the lineage of a sound or technique starting with those pioneers. Second, and the most important thing I learned, is that when an 80s score is not released one year it is most likely they might get to it the next year or the next one after that. When a Golden Age score isn't released there is a higher chance it is slowly disintegrating somewhere. So when a Golden Age score is released by Kritzerland, LaLaLand, Intrada, Varese, SAE, MMM or anyone, it isn't just a release, it is being saved and I practically get down on my knees to thank them. There are scores that have been lost to the ages and a few of those are probably unheralded classics. So when I hear what amounts to "let them rot!" my blood boils and I side with many a prejudiced Golden Age fan. If only because if I suddenly change my mind about a composer whose works have been lost, it will be too late.



"Golden Age scores released by Kritzerland, LaLaLand, Intrada, Varese, SAE, MMM or anyone"


VARESE? Hmmmm ........ eek


Well...the last time I looked Varese still holds the record for the largest number of score releases by Alfred Newman, Franz Waxman and Alex North. This after stiff competition from the likes of FSM, SAE, Intrada and, lately Kritzerland. I know it is fashionable to cop the attitude of "what have you done for me lately?" (and on the internet that can mean within the last week or two) but as far as I am concerned it's the other labels that have to play catch-up.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2013 - 2:55 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

TO MORRICONE- Now there is a very good point, a very noble selfless point. To prevent something from being gone forever. I can understand that. there is plenty of time for the newer ones.Bringing facts into this long bantering discussion not just personal opinions RIGHT ON.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2013 - 3:27 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

Even though Golden Age scores were not my favorites when I started collecting, so a part of me relates to some of these nubies, I soon learned a couple things. As many a composer has said many a time, these are the giants of film music on whose shoulders newer ones stand. This isn't just lip service, any one with half an ear can find the lineage of a sound or technique starting with those pioneers. Second, and the most important thing I learned, is that when an 80s score is not released one year it is most likely they might get to it the next year or the next one after that. When a Golden Age score isn't released there is a higher chance it is slowly disintegrating somewhere. So when a Golden Age score is released by Kritzerland, LaLaLand, Intrada, Varese, SAE, MMM or anyone, it isn't just a release, it is being saved and I practically get down on my knees to thank them. There are scores that have been lost to the ages and a few of those are probably unheralded classics. So when I hear what amounts to "let them rot!" my blood boils and I side with many a prejudiced Golden Age fan. If only because if I suddenly change my mind about a composer whose works have been lost, it will be too late.

Further to all that, and it's well put, many of the Golden Age composers composed for the concert hall (Rozsa, Korngold, Herrmann etc), and many of their concert works are being re-discovered by classical labels. Rozsa, for instance, even as his star has dimmed slightly on the filmmusic front, has been hailed by several critics as the third most important Hungarian composer after Bartok and Kodaly. And even many composers who never wrote a note for the concert hall clearly had the talent to do so had they wished, and just as clearly often wrote filmmusic at least as good as what was being written for the concert hall. (Anyone with half an ear can hear that, say, Newman's The Robe score is of too extraordinary a quality to risk being lost). I'm not saying every note of every Golden Age composer is gold, just that we need to preserve as much of it as possible until posterity decides what's gold and what's dross. And as Morricone rightly points out, releasing these scores is the most practical way of preserving them.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2013 - 9:00 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Even though Golden Age scores were not my favorites when I started collecting, so a part of me relates to some of these nubies, I soon learned a couple things. As many a composer has said many a time, these are the giants of film music on whose shoulders newer ones stand. This isn't just lip service, any one with half an ear can find the lineage of a sound or technique starting with those pioneers. Second, and the most important thing I learned, is that when an 80s score is not released one year it is most likely they might get to it the next year or the next one after that. When a Golden Age score isn't released there is a higher chance it is slowly disintegrating somewhere. So when a Golden Age score is released by Kritzerland, LaLaLand, Intrada, Varese, SAE, MMM or anyone, it isn't just a release, it is being saved and I practically get down on my knees to thank them. There are scores that have been lost to the ages and a few of those are probably unheralded classics. So when I hear what amounts to "let them rot!" my blood boils and I side with many a prejudiced Golden Age fan. If only because if I suddenly change my mind about a composer whose works have been lost, it will be too late.



"Golden Age scores released by Kritzerland, LaLaLand, Intrada, Varese, SAE, MMM or anyone"


VARESE? Hmmmm ........ eek


Well...the last time I looked Varese still holds the record for the largest number of score releases by Alfred Newman, Franz Waxman and Alex North. This after stiff competition from the likes of FSM, SAE, Intrada and, lately Kritzerland. I know it is fashionable to cop the attitude of "what have you done for me lately?" (and on the internet that can mean within the last week or two) but as far as I am concerned it's the other labels that have to play catch-up.




I was referring to the lack of golden age cds from Varese for the past half dozen years or longer, not the last week or two.

Sure, since the late 1970s when Varese started they have given us a great amount of golden age cds to be sure, and some great ones from the 70s, 80s etc. too. Luckily we now have Kritzerland, Intrada, LLL etc. to carry on.

I agree with your post, you make many good points.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2013 - 9:05 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

I think a lot of it is that we like what we grew up with, & what you liked in your teens & twenties stays with you for life. I was lucky enough to be born in 1950, so had all those 60's films, & on the telly (in the UK) it was all 30's 40's & 50's movies.



Being born in 1946, we are about the same age and your experience with golden age films and their scores mirror my experience too. Only I lived in Boston, Mass., USA! smile

 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2013 - 9:27 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

I think a lot of it is that we like what we grew up with, & what you liked in your teens & twenties stays with you for life. I was lucky enough to be born in 1950, so had all those 60's films, & on the telly (in the UK) it was all 30's 40's & 50's movies.

I didn't grow up watching Golden Age stuff or really listening to it. I just moved towards it over time because it was better quality music. I am only 27 years old and so I came of age during the 90s, and yet I saw so few films in the 90s that I didn't really get into the film scores from that era. The ones I do enjoy are because it is good music not because of any attachment to the film. So yes I think it is possible to enjoy good music across the entire spectrum regardless of when it was released simply based on what is good music.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2013 - 9:42 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

I think a lot of it is that we like what we grew up with, & what you liked in your teens & twenties stays with you for life. I was lucky enough to be born in 1950, so had all those 60's films, & on the telly (in the UK) it was all 30's 40's & 50's movies.

I didn't grow up watching Golden Age stuff or really listening to it. I just moved towards it over time because it was better quality music. I am only 27 years old and so I came of age during the 90s, and yet I saw so few films in the 90s that I didn't really get into the film scores from that era. The ones I do enjoy are because it is good music not because of any attachment to the film. So yes I think it is possible to enjoy good music across the entire spectrum regardless of when it was released simply based on what is good music.



I agree. The 1930s and 1940s were before my time yet I like many of the films and their scores. For that matter, probably a large per cent of the music I have and enjoy I never saw the films at all! It's just good music that stands on its own merits. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2013 - 10:39 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

I agree that movies in our youth may attract us to certain scores. They certainly attracted me to Goldsmith and Bernstein.

But I love Sirusjr's "exception" story, and I LOVE what Sirusjr wrote. He was willing to "go back" and listen to movie music way before his time and to look at and listen to music that has spanned many decades. Having a narrow focus or being aurally myopic means that some people will never know the beauty they are missing.

 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2013 - 11:31 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

I mostly craved good orchestral music and listened to samples of everything being released after I started collecting. Occasionally I found a soundtrack that sounded like it aged well and the tapes were in good condition and I bought it because the theme grabbed me. I judge all samples equally in that I require interesting themes and good quality sound. Beyond that it doesn't matter. My oldest score is Dragon Seed (1944).

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 13, 2013 - 9:30 AM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

I mostly craved good orchestral music and listened to samples of everything being released after I started collecting. Occasionally I found a soundtrack that sounded like it aged well and the tapes were in good condition and I bought it because the theme grabbed me. I judge all samples equally in that I require interesting themes and good quality sound. Beyond that it doesn't matter. My oldest score is Dragon Seed (1944).



I have you beat Sirusjr.

My oldest score, to a talkie film, is Max Steiner's Cimarron at 1931!

My favorite oldest score is Steiner's Most Dangerous Game at 1932. The Morgan/Stromberg re-recording is fantastic. Great film too!

I'm glad to see you are willing to give all decades of film scores a listen! smile

 
 Posted:   Dec 13, 2013 - 11:37 AM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

Well I meant oldest original release. I might have some older re-recordings.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 13, 2013 - 11:46 AM   
 By:   slint   (Member)

I agree that movies in our youth may attract us to certain scores. They certainly attracted me to Goldsmith and Bernstein.

But I love Sirusjr's "exception" story, and I LOVE what Sirusjr wrote. He was willing to "go back" and listen to movie music way before his time and to look at and listen to music that has spanned many decades. Having a narrow focus or being aurally myopic means that some people will never know the beauty they are missing.


I don't think it is an exception. My story is probably similar.

I also like Italian soundtracks (well European in general, but Italia clearly dominates the market) from the 60s and 70s, and I am not Italian. For many of these soundtracks I am pretty sure almost no one who own the CDs saw the movie (and probably even the ones who produced the CDs), and most buyers are probably not Italian born in the 40s and 50s.

And the opposite; for me it seems more natural to go back to classical music, the 40s to 80s, than to try to listen new composers/bands with people half my age. I'm not proud of this, that's just the way I feel.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 13, 2013 - 12:26 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Even though Golden Age scores were not my favorites when I started collecting, so a part of me relates to some of these nubies, I soon learned a couple things. As many a composer has said many a time, these are the giants of film music on whose shoulders newer ones stand. This isn't just lip service, any one with half an ear can find the lineage of a sound or technique starting with those pioneers. Second, and the most important thing I learned, is that when an 80s score is not released one year it is most likely they might get to it the next year or the next one after that. When a Golden Age score isn't released there is a higher chance it is slowly disintegrating somewhere. So when a Golden Age score is released by Kritzerland, LaLaLand, Intrada, Varese, SAE, MMM or anyone, it isn't just a release, it is being saved and I practically get down on my knees to thank them. There are scores that have been lost to the ages and a few of those are probably unheralded classics. So when I hear what amounts to "let them rot!" my blood boils and I side with many a prejudiced Golden Age fan. If only because if I suddenly change my mind about a composer whose works have been lost, it will be too late.



"Golden Age scores released by Kritzerland, LaLaLand, Intrada, Varese, SAE, MMM or anyone"


VARESE? Hmmmm ........ eek


Well...the last time I looked Varese still holds the record for the largest number of score releases by Alfred Newman, Franz Waxman and Alex North. This after stiff competition from the likes of FSM, SAE, Intrada and, lately Kritzerland. I know it is fashionable to cop the attitude of "what have you done for me lately?" (and on the internet that can mean within the last week or two) but as far as I am concerned it's the other labels that have to play catch-up.




I was referring to the lack of golden age cds from Varese for the past half dozen years or longer, not the last week or two.

Sure, since the late 1970s when Varese started they have given us a great amount of golden age cds to be sure, and some great ones from the 70s, 80s etc. too. Luckily we now have Kritzerland, Intrada, LLL etc. to carry on.

I agree with your post, you make many good points.



Thank you, sometimes I am surprised people don't immediately equate Golden age release with a score "saved" for posterity. To be fair there are even scores from later decades that could be disintegrating. But most aren't in the unsalvageable category that most Golden Age scores are.

As for Varese I guess I have a pretty liberal view of what is Golden age since anything by a Golden Age composer kind of qualifies for me so the Hitchcock Hour CDs (2011-2012), the Herrmann Box (2011), THE SNAKE PIT (2010), CRIME IN THE STREETS (2009), THE PRESIDENT'S LADY (2008), NORTH BY NORTHWEST (2007) and RETURN TO PEYTON PLACE (2006) all qualify in a continuing salute and respect to Golden Agers.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 13, 2013 - 7:31 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Even though Golden Age scores were not my favorites when I started collecting, so a part of me relates to some of these nubies, I soon learned a couple things. As many a composer has said many a time, these are the giants of film music on whose shoulders newer ones stand. This isn't just lip service, any one with half an ear can find the lineage of a sound or technique starting with those pioneers. Second, and the most important thing I learned, is that when an 80s score is not released one year it is most likely they might get to it the next year or the next one after that. When a Golden Age score isn't released there is a higher chance it is slowly disintegrating somewhere. So when a Golden Age score is released by Kritzerland, LaLaLand, Intrada, Varese, SAE, MMM or anyone, it isn't just a release, it is being saved and I practically get down on my knees to thank them. There are scores that have been lost to the ages and a few of those are probably unheralded classics. So when I hear what amounts to "let them rot!" my blood boils and I side with many a prejudiced Golden Age fan. If only because if I suddenly change my mind about a composer whose works have been lost, it will be too late.



"Golden Age scores released by Kritzerland, LaLaLand, Intrada, Varese, SAE, MMM or anyone"


VARESE? Hmmmm ........ eek


Well...the last time I looked Varese still holds the record for the largest number of score releases by Alfred Newman, Franz Waxman and Alex North. This after stiff competition from the likes of FSM, SAE, Intrada and, lately Kritzerland. I know it is fashionable to cop the attitude of "what have you done for me lately?" (and on the internet that can mean within the last week or two) but as far as I am concerned it's the other labels that have to play catch-up.




I was referring to the lack of golden age cds from Varese for the past half dozen years or longer, not the last week or two.

Sure, since the late 1970s when Varese started they have given us a great amount of golden age cds to be sure, and some great ones from the 70s, 80s etc. too. Luckily we now have Kritzerland, Intrada, LLL etc. to carry on.

I agree with your post, you make many good points.



Thank you, sometimes I am surprised people don't immediately equate Golden age release with a score "saved" for posterity. To be fair there are even scores from later decades that could be disintegrating. But most aren't in the unsalvageable category that most Golden Age scores are.

As for Varese I guess I have a pretty liberal view of what is Golden age since anything by a Golden Age composer kind of qualifies for me so the Hitchcock Hour CDs (2011-2012), the Herrmann Box (2011), THE SNAKE PIT (2010), CRIME IN THE STREETS (2009), THE PRESIDENT'S LADY (2008), NORTH BY NORTHWEST (2007) and RETURN TO PEYTON PLACE (2006) all qualify in a continuing salute and respect to Golden Agers.




Maybe some of us are being too hard on Varese?

The 7 or so items you listed, that is it for 7 years? About one golden age a year?

Of course I am still appreciative for ANY golden age cds, and the Herrmann Box makes up for all!

 
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