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 Posted:   Mar 7, 2012 - 5:41 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

I hate to be a sour grape, but in what mindset is something like "Carter They Come, Carter They Fall" funny? It seems to try to be funny, but in the end it's just a thoughtless pun.

I agree. Kind of diminishes the music, like if Rozsa had titled the nativity cue in Ben-Hur "Mary Had a Little Lamb", or for the Christ/desert/water track, something like "Judah and Jesus went up the hill to fetch a pail of water".

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2012 - 9:23 PM   
 By:   Amer Zahid   (Member)

I hate to be a sour grape, but in what mindset is something like "Carter They Come, Carter They Fall" funny? It seems to try to be funny, but in the end it's just a thoughtless pun.

I agree. Kind of diminishes the music, like if Rozsa had titled the nativity cue in Ben-Hur "Mary Had a Little Lamb", or for the Christ/desert/water track, something like "Judah and Jesus went up the hill to fetch a pail of water".



hilarious..!

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2012 - 9:23 PM   
 By:   Amer Zahid   (Member)

dp

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2012 - 9:24 PM   
 By:   Amer Zahid   (Member)

This is my favorite score of Giacchino's. I think he does something that may be a turning point for his evolution as a composer here--he integrates the very emotionally direct writing familiar from things like Lost and the opening of Star Trek with his action music. Before this, particularly in the Mission Impossible scores and Star Trek, the action music was extremely aggressive, designed to punch through the sound mix, so it tended to exist apart from the more emotional writing at times. Here it all works more as a whole--this is the most romantic sci-fi score I've heard since Arnold's Stargate. Great stuff.

LIKE! Definitively ordering this cd!

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 12:16 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

I hate to be a sour grape, but in what mindset is something like "Carter They Come, Carter They Fall" funny? It seems to try to be funny, but in the end it's just a thoughtless pun.

I agree. Kind of diminishes the music, like if Rozsa had titled the nativity cue in Ben-Hur "Mary Had a Little Lamb", or for the Christ/desert/water track, something like "Judah and Jesus went up the hill to fetch a pail of water".


How can a title on a CD back cover can diminish the music on the CD?

Get a grip, guys...

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 12:59 AM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

I agree. Kind of diminishes the music, like if Rozsa had titled the nativity cue in Ben-Hur "Mary Had a Little Lamb", or for the Christ/desert/water track, something like "Judah and Jesus went up the hill to fetch a pail of water".

How can a title on a CD back cover can diminish the music on the CD?
Get a grip, guys...


You're probably right. When I think about it further, Parade of the Charioteers might even have been given added gravitas by being entitled "Crash, Bang, Wallop".

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 2:36 AM   
 By:   KubrickFan   (Member)

So when we have a new release on which the music is fantastic, suddenly the punny titles are what's wrong? Though I think Elliot Goldenthal's are more clever, Giacchino's brings a smile to my face. And at least it's much better than the ones that completely spoil what happen, like John Williams often does. I'll take "A Thern for the Worse" over something like "Qui-Gon's Noble End" any day.

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 4:57 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

I agree. Kind of diminishes the music, like if Rozsa had titled the nativity cue in Ben-Hur "Mary Had a Little Lamb", or for the Christ/desert/water track, something like "Judah and Jesus went up the hill to fetch a pail of water".

How can a title on a CD back cover can diminish the music on the CD?
Get a grip, guys...


You're probably right. When I think about it further, Parade of the Charioteers might even have been given added gravitas by being entitled "Crash, Bang, Wallop".


I would love the music even if it were named "Title No.1", "title No. 2" etc.

Do you really read the track titles when you´re listening to the music and get so riled up that you cannot concentrate on the music anymore?

What if you don´t like the cover?

What if you don´t like the name of one of the musicians?

What if you don´t agree with the shape of a CD?

Does it all ruin the music for you which is just packaged in there?

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 5:41 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

I agree. Kind of diminishes the music, like if Rozsa had titled the nativity cue in Ben-Hur "Mary Had a Little Lamb", or for the Christ/desert/water track, something like "Judah and Jesus went up the hill to fetch a pail of water".

How can a title on a CD back cover can diminish the music on the CD?
Get a grip, guys...


You're probably right. When I think about it further, Parade of the Charioteers might even have been given added gravitas by being entitled "Crash, Bang, Wallop".


I would love the music even if it were named "Title No.1", "title No. 2" etc.

Do you really read the track titles when you´re listening to the music and get so riled up that you cannot concentrate on the music anymore?

What if you don´t like the cover?

What if you don´t like the name of one of the musicians?

What if you don´t agree with the shape of a CD?

Does it all ruin the music for you which is just packaged in there?



Getting back to the actual point, what Jeff said is completely valid. And because he's famous, you have to listen to his opinion, at least.

Obviously the music is the most important thing. I know that Giacchino doesn't do these titles by himself, but if they put more thought into making the music interesting, it'd be easier to forgive the BS titles. I feel that, at this point, we've heard all that Giacchino can do musically. He can sometimes write a pretty tune (Up or Ratatouille are two obvious examples), but by and large, has he ever written something that you didn't completely predict as soon as you heard that he was scoring it?

Sorry for the negative opinion!

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 6:30 AM   
 By:   AlexCope   (Member)

I feel that, at this point, we've heard all that Giacchino can do musically.

I've listened to John Carter a couple times now thanks to the Amazon MP3 sale and the one time I'm truly caught off guard by the music is that bright brass fanfare at the end of "Carter They Come, Carter They Fall" (god, who comes up with these titles? Alf?) - but it lasts all of five seconds. Then it's back to another Lost 2.0 moment. Those are lovely moments though, so by no means do I mean this is mediocre music. For instance the cue "The Prize is Barsoom" is a wonderfully well-developed and surprisingly melodic action cue, the racing strings underneath the brass evoking Duel of the Fates, and the main theme has some of the sweep of Stargate even if it doesn't quite reach the same heights. So overall I think the score is classy and entertaining enough, but my take on Giacchino remains the same. He's obviously a talented composer, and I'm glad he's getting big assignments like these for the sake of having big orchestral scores in movies, but I have a similar reaction to him that I have to John Ottman - the sound's there, the melody's there - on paper I should love the guy's work (and want to!) but most of the time I just sort-of like it - and maybe that's good enough - but it just doesn't move me or excite me as much as I want it to.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 6:56 AM   
 By:   Vermithrax Pejorative   (Member)

>>>>>>Getting back to the actual point, what Jeff said is completely valid. And because he's famous, you have to listen to his opinion, at least.>>>>>>>

Funniest thing I've read on the net all week!!!

Okay, all you non-famous people, you ain't got no opinion that counts!

Truly gobsmacked!

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 7:13 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)


So overall I think the score is classy and entertaining enough, but my take on Giacchino remains the same. He's obviously a talented composer, and I'm glad he's getting big assignments like these for the sake of having big orchestral scores in movies, but I have a similar reaction to him that I have to John Ottman - the sound's there, the melody's there - on paper I should love the guy's work (and want to!) but most of the time I just sort-of like it - and maybe that's good enough - but it just doesn't move me or excite me as much as I want it to.


As usual, Al says it best. The Ottman comparison is completely on-the-nose.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 12:25 PM   
 By:   TJ   (Member)

I bought the $3.99 Mp3 album and my thoughts are the same as Al and Shaun. I was really excited about this with all the hype, and there are definitely some strong individual cues, but by the end, I just wasn't feeling it. I kept hearing the Lost-ism's and was left wondering if maybe the album was shorter, would I have enjoyed it more?

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 4:04 PM   
 By:   The REAL BJBien   (Member)

I bought the $3.99 Mp3 album and my thoughts are the same as Al and Shaun. I was really excited about this with all the hype, and there are definitely some strong individual cues, but by the end, I just wasn't feeling it. I kept hearing the Lost-ism's and was left wondering if maybe the album was shorter, would I have enjoyed it more?

Another reason I'm grateful for NOT watching LOST properly [missed a few episodes throughout the run and had friends fill me in] or ever picked up the TV soundtracks.

As a whole, the score is rather strong but as others have noted, it isn't STARGATE or even CUTTHROAT ISLAND but over all I like it just fine and certainly more then GHOST PROTOCOL.

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 4:54 PM   
 By:   johnmullin   (Member)


So overall I think the score is classy and entertaining enough, but my take on Giacchino remains the same. He's obviously a talented composer, and I'm glad he's getting big assignments like these for the sake of having big orchestral scores in movies, but I have a similar reaction to him that I have to John Ottman - the sound's there, the melody's there - on paper I should love the guy's work (and want to!) but most of the time I just sort-of like it - and maybe that's good enough - but it just doesn't move me or excite me as much as I want it to.


As usual, Al says it best. The Ottman comparison is completely on-the-nose.


AlexCope's comment above perfectly sums up how I feel about most of what MG does.

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 5:17 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

I've been listening to film music a while. Oh, all right...nearly five decades (that's "50" for those of you who don't know what a decade is! wink )

I haven't been excited by more than a few up-and-coming composers over those years...composers who weren't exactly new to the scene but who were just getting established in feature film.

An early few were John Williams...and John Barry...and Jerry Goldsmith.

Others include Basil Poledouris...and, more recently, Michael Giacchino.

I didn't find "John Carter" predictable as did Mr. Rutherford. I found it thrilling. I also don't think we've heard all Giacchino has to offer musically. In fact, I don't think he's even begun. If I had thought "How to Steal A Million" was all he'd have ever offered musically, I'd have condemned Mr. Williams as Mr. Rutherford, regretfully, did Mr. Giacchino.

Even when he surprised us with "The Poseidon Adventure" and "The Towering Inferno," I don't think anyone was "ho-hum" about "Jaws"...and NOBODY knew he had a "Close Encounters of the 3rd Kind" or "Star Wars" in him. No-siree.

Dont' throw Giacchino under the bus just yet. I know it damns him to have won Emmys and Oscars....to have industry recognition. Some of us know he deserves it and that his talents are still unfolding.

As for titles having catchy names, Basil, do I need to point out the silliness of suggesting that "Ben-Hur"-like solemnity in track names should be engaged for a film like "John Carter"? The contemporary (21st century) trend is toward catchiness in phrasing...something Giacchino has a clever penchant for. I don't think he has someone else naming his tracks, but I could be wrong.

Miklos Rozsa, classically trained in the early part of the 20th Century, certainly had a sense of humor, but I daresay it never occurred to him to apply any of it to his music titles. I'll also point out that those who say Giacchino repeats himself too much obviously haven't listened to Rozsa very much. Score after score after score sounds TOTALLY like Rozsa because he repeats phrasing and runs and all sorts of Rozsaesque sounds although the melodies in the scoring are always fresh and original.

Ditto Giacchino. There's more to him than there is to most other composers working today. A gift for melody is his main strength...plus he has that rare ability to get under the skin of the scenes he's scoring and invests emotion and warmth, intellect and God-given musical talent into each of his scores.

He's not a 19th Century Romanticist, by no means. But for the 21st Century, he's DA MAN!

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 5:25 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

>>>>>>Getting back to the actual point, what Jeff said is completely valid. And because he's famous, you have to listen to his opinion, at least.>>>>>>>

Funniest thing I've read on the net all week!!!

Okay, all you non-famous people, you ain't got no opinion that counts!

Truly gobsmacked!


Jeff, forgive me, but I have to agree that this IS one of the funniest things posted here in a long time. But, awwwwwwwwwww....it's so sweetly naive.

It's true that Jeff is a professional...in fact, all of us are professionals of one kind of another (those of us who work, for instance). Jeff does write about film music, among other things. Jeff does not, however, write titles for film music tracks. At least, not to my knowledge. His opinion is his own...and his bias is his own. It is not "more informed" than anyone else's here on this particular topic.

It's a preference. Once you guys see the film -- and one must presume that is something that will happen -- you'll all know exactly what scenes the music accompanies when you do. Till then, "Enjoy!"

Or not.

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 5:28 PM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

>>>>>>Getting back to the actual point, what Jeff said is completely valid. And because he's famous, you have to listen to his opinion, at least.>>>>>>>

Funniest thing I've read on the net all week!!!

Okay, all you non-famous people, you ain't got no opinion that counts!

Truly gobsmacked!


Jeff, forgive me, but I have to agree that this IS one of the funniest things posted here in a long time.

Jeff is a professional...in fact, all of us are professionals of one kind of another (those of us who work, for instance). Jeff does write about film music, among other things. Jeff does not, however, write titles for film music tracks. At least, not to my knowledge. His opinion is his own...and his bias is his own. It is not "more informed" than anyone else's here on this particular topic.

It's a preference. Once you guys see the film -- and one must presume that is something that will happen -- you'll all know exactly what scenes the music accompanies when you do. Till then, "Enjoy!"

Or not.



It's really sad that I have to point out that I was obviously joking about that. But oh well.

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 5:30 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

>>>>>>Getting back to the actual point, what Jeff said is completely valid. And because he's famous, you have to listen to his opinion, at least.>>>>>>>

It's really sad that I have to point out that I was obviously joking about that. But oh well.


Joking? You "said" it, and if anything is "sad", it's THAT you said it! Again, it was kind of sweet, too. And funny...as befitting a joke!

big grin

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2012 - 7:12 PM   
 By:   book1245   (Member)

According to Amazon I should have the soundtrack tomorrow afternoon, but I leave in an hour to see the movie.

Based on the samples I've let myself hear, I have a feeling I am going to love this whole score, and I'm getting excited just thinking about it!

 
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