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 Posted:   Dec 3, 2007 - 10:26 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Not knowing the episode, but if the program originally aired as a two hour oneshot, or if there was a lengthy recap of Part 1 before going into Part 2, that would usually account for a shorter running time.

That's what I was thinking. A show like M:I simply isn't lucid with any kind of edit, no matter how "judicious" it may be. "The Contender" seemed complete to me. And yes, there was a lengthy recap of Part I in Part II. However, "The Bunker" was 50 minutes each part. Go figure.

 
 Posted:   Dec 3, 2007 - 11:05 AM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

Oh, "The Contender" part I plays at 50 min and part II runs for 45 min. Have there been any edits, Stefan? Are you familiar with the full running time? All of the other shows run at an average of 50+ minutes, and appear unedited.


Have you checked the running time of the season 2 two-parter "The Council"? Because the same crew did it: director Paul Stanley and writers Woodfield and Balter...

 
 Posted:   Dec 3, 2007 - 11:07 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Oh, "The Contender" part I plays at 50 min and part II runs for 45 min. Have there been any edits, Stefan? Are you familiar with the full running time? All of the other shows run at an average of 50+ minutes, and appear unedited.


Have you checked the running time of the season 2 two-parter "The Council"? Because the same crew did it: director Paul Stanley and writers Woodfield and Balter...


Does that have any bearing as to the running time? I'll check today.

 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 11:47 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Correction: "The Contender"'s two parts each run 45:24, not counting the Paramount logo at the end, which comes to 45:31. I still can't tell whether any edits were made, as the narrative flows quite nicely. Besides, how much "padding" can a boxing story have?

 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2007 - 3:08 AM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

Correction: "The Contender"'s two parts each run 45:24, not counting the Paramount logo at the end, which comes to 45:31. I still can't tell whether any edits were made, as the narrative flows quite nicely. Besides, how much "padding" can a boxing story have?


According to the reviewers at Amazon, your remark is correct.
http://www.amazon.com/review/product/B000UX6TJI/ref=cm_cr_dp_all_helpful?%5Fencoding=UTF8&coliid=&showViewpoints=1&colid=&sortBy=bySubmissionDateDescending



"Mission edited, but still good", December 20, 2007
By Bennet Pomerantz "Bennet Pomerantz, AUDIOWORLD" (Seabrook, Maryland)

"Some episodes may be edited from their original network versions", November 21, 2007
By Simple Simon (Brampton, ON)


Simple Simon says:
Update: Both parts 1 and 2 of "The Contender" have been cut by five minutes.

 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2007 - 10:12 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I can deal with the edits, since it isn't widespread. As long as any given show has a 50 minute running time, I'm content that any cuts made would not be noticable. To my viewing senses, the remainder of S3 appears to be unedited.

 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2007 - 10:15 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Oh! I've been rewatching S2 and have really enjoyed "The Spy", with what amounts to a "What's Rollin thinking" type episode. The show is almost like real spy goings on because of the two sides vying for the defense plan overlay.

 
 Posted:   Jan 1, 2008 - 9:04 AM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)


Simple Simon says:
Update: Both parts 1 and 2 of "The Contender" have been cut by five minutes.


I have to wonder if he's speaking from inside knowledge of what's supposedly "missing" from this two-parter. It could easily be that the episode as it was made wasn't planned to be two parts, and then they ended up extending it so it could run two parts, and as a consequence it might not necessarily have broken down at a clean 50 minutes for both parts.

 
 Posted:   Jan 1, 2008 - 12:39 PM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)


Simple Simon says:
Update: Both parts 1 and 2 of "The Contender" have been cut by five minutes.


I have to wonder if he's speaking from inside knowledge of what's supposedly "missing" from this two-parter. It could easily be that the episode as it was made wasn't planned to be two parts, and then they ended up extending it so it could run two parts, and as a consequence it might not necessarily have broken down at a clean 50 minutes for both parts.




I can't discuss at the moment about season 3 because I've encountered an unexpected delay in my delivery.

 
 Posted:   Jan 2, 2008 - 3:34 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)


Simple Simon says:
Update: Both parts 1 and 2 of "The Contender" have been cut by five minutes.


I have to wonder if he's speaking from inside knowledge of what's supposedly "missing" from this two-parter. It could easily be that the episode as it was made wasn't planned to be two parts, and then they ended up extending it so it could run two parts, and as a consequence it might not necessarily have broken down at a clean 50 minutes for both parts.


As I mentioned before, it *seems* that there's nothing blatantly missing or any jarring edits to continuity, as M:I would suffer greatly if as much as five minutes was cut.

On the subject of season 3, I re-watched "The Interrogator" again and I have to say that it was well directed and edited (meaning artistically, not the bad kind) and Henry Silva was great as Norvan Krueger. Love those "foreign" names!

 
 Posted:   Jan 2, 2008 - 4:05 PM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

There's one other thing about "The Contender" that makes me think they at first intended it to air in a two hour time slot, and that's the fact that there's only one set of end credits, meaning characters who only appeared in part 1 or part 2 appear in the end credits both times (the most notable example being Robert Conrad, who cameoed in Part 1 as Barney's trainer)

 
 Posted:   Jan 3, 2008 - 8:32 AM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

I finally received my American DVD set of MISSION season 3
along with THE WILD WILD WEST season 3 after a battle
during the month of December--I call it the black December.
What a relief, folks!
Let the fun begins now...



PS: Before getting my DVDs, I went to the dentist: that was MARATHON MAN. I take some pills to calm down the pain.
Is it safe?

 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2008 - 2:04 PM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

These are edited prints and I have the evidences. I watched today the season opener entitled "The Heir Apparent" which was among the first six episodes produced by William Read Woodfield and Allan Balter and these six ones originally featured blue letters for the opening cast credits and the original Paramount logo to finish. What we witness instead is: the yellow letters for the opening cast credits that was introduced later in the season by the third producer named Stanley Kallis and a fixed picture of the hand that light the fuse to close the series.

 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2008 - 2:21 PM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

That isn't my definition of what constitutes an "edited" episode because this has become a common practice of "standardizing" those kinds of title sequences. To me "edited" simply refers to whether the episode story content has been altered in terms of cut scenes or changed music.

 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2008 - 4:33 PM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

***ZONA RESTRIK • ENTRE FERBATEN***


...minefields...


***SPOILER***



54-THE HEIR APPARENT (Season Opener)
(produced by William Read Woodfield and Allan Balter)

Tape scene:
Jim drives a white convertible inside a park and stops by. He inserts two 25 cents coins inside an out of order public phone, presses a button and turns a key that opens a panel. He listens to a mini reel player.

Summary
To prevent the iron overthrow of the Slavic monarchy of Povia by the ruthless General Qaisette and let Archbishop Djelvas freely name a new successor to the throne, Cinnamon poses as the so-called dead and blind Princess Celine. Jim creates a diversion inside the royal cathedral and Barney and Willy are arrested by the police, sent to a solitary cell, escape and customize the royal vault by adding a phony diary of the late Prince regent and by tricking a puzzle box. Qaisette makes a deal with Jim for $100,000 and a visa so that Cinnamon-as-Celine will be officially unmasked as an impostor and put an end to Archbishop Djelvas' political influence.

Cast and details:
General Envir Qaisette (nickname: Quisi) and his chief of the secret police Zageb, Archbishop Djelvas are played by Charles Aidman and Rudy Solari, Torin Thatcher--Rudy Solari was one of the leading character of a 1967 anarchist WWII series entitled: "Garrison's Gorillas". Rollin poses as the 73 years old Dr. Emil Holsein and then a Povia aristocrat in the royal cathedral. Cinnamon poses as first a silent nun from the Order of St. Cassik who goes to confession and sticks a portable suction pad (containing special tools for Barney and Willy: silent hammer and graver, bunch of keys) in the booth and as the old blind Slavic Princess Celine with two scares on her arm; she uses drops of a serum to turn blind. Jim poses as a tourist visiting the royal cathedral and taking pictures and also the leader named the professor of a "Topkapi" gang along with his associates: Barney disguised as a monk and Willy as a cleaning man who sprays some acid on a display cabinet to make a wax impression of a royal locket via a thurible filled with clay; to help Cinnamon-as-Celine, Willy paints the puzzle box with dots of nail varnish in specific sides. Jim stays at the Metropole hotel, room 409--but we see that it is the Europa hotel through Jim's driving mirror. To escape from their cell, Willy takes the glasses off of his Soviet spectacles to help Barney digging a solid brick's wall! The guards in the cathedral are dressed as Spanish policemen unlike the prison guards which look like totalitarian season 1 types a la "Old Man Out".
Features no dossier scene!

Review:
The first episode that launches the monarchic plot with a reference to the Anastasia princess! Among the best season 3 but not on my list because too sentimental. The peak of the drama is the well-synchronized scene of Cinnamon quietly opening the puzzle box while Rollin removes his disguise piece by piece (leathered pockets, moustache, lapels, tie, spectacles, locks of hair) in the middle of an Orthodox ceremony! Anyway, notice Lalo Schifrin's highly suspenseful slavic harp-laden score plus Celine's slow harpsichord theme.

Stock music:
"Memory" (production titles)
"Pilot" (Barney and Willy enter the royal vault)

 
 Posted:   Jan 5, 2008 - 8:54 AM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

***SYNDICATE TERRITORY***

***Spoiler***





55-THE CONTENDER, PART I
(produced by William Read Woodfield and Allan Balter)

Tape scene:
Jim is going down the stairs of a rent boat company and recites the password (“You got a five-eights horsepower ?”) to an employee carrying sunglasses who removes the “out of order” sign of a small boat. Aboard the boat and far away from the harbor, Jim opens a tool box and activates a mini reel player.

Summary:
In order to avoid the complete corruption of boxing by illegal bets and to remain in the world community of athletics, the IMF must eradicate the activities of racketeer Charles Buckman. Jim convinces boxer Richy Lemoine (with burnt hands), resting in a hospital, to help training Barney. The IMF infiltrates the boxing arena: Barney posing as retired Richy Lemoine, Jim as a crooked bookie to work for Syndicate bet man Dan Whelan and Cinnamon as Buckman’s new girlfriend. At night, Rollin goes to Haldeman’s Gym, distracts the attention of cleanup man Johnny “Kid” Wilson (former boxer from the 1950’s) and checks out the changing-room while Jim installs a pair of drug-releasing devices near the spittoons to trick the next day’s fight between Barney and contender Stevens but enter hitman Wesley and three men playing dice near the ring... To be continued.

Cast and details:
Racketeer Charles Buckman and his black henchman Wesley, untouchable boxer Artie Calvitos, vicious Syndicate boxer Ernie Staczek, Syndicate delegate Dan Whelan and his hitman Vince (and an un-named bet manager with no actor credits), cleanup man Kid Wilson played by Ron Randell, boxer Sugar Ray Robinson, Wayne McLaren, Robert Phillips, John Dehner and Thomas Geas, Biff Elliott. Featuring guest IMF extras: wounded war hero/former boxer Richy Lemoine (Ron Rich) and boxing coach Bobby (Robert Conrad). This episode contains Robert Conrad's stuntmen team from "The Wild Wild West": Robert Phillips, Richard Cangey, Red West and Tom Huff. Find how Buckman treat people who don’t play by his rules: refusing to be bribed, young boxer Artie Calvitos is pushed in the void of the elevator shaft from Buckman’s building by Wesley (who previously turns the call button at 90 degrees clockwise). Barney poses as boxing champion Richy Lemoine thanks to Rollin's expertise in makeup: false nose and moustache, a greasy wig. Rollin poses as Barney’s manager Linc Webster. Jim poses as former accountant, thief, convict, boxing arena popcorn seller Phillip Emmett who hides his tools inside a popcorn basket; to be hired by Dan Whelan, Jim customizes the steam pipe of a corridor (thanks to a rotating cutting vice) and pretends to save Whelan from an explosion; Jim drops his wallet on purpose so that Whelan sends his man Vince to thank him with $1,000 in cash and get a job offer as a bet cashier (Jim appears at Whelan’s office without being shaved); Jim does a second dirty job: he fixes two wood boxes that contain gas-induced devices under the ring and sticks two magnetic remote controls on the sides to remove the system. Cinnamon poses as an un-named boxing groupie who has the same hairdresser as Buckman’s girlfriend and who seduces Ernie Staczek to get in touch with Buckman. Willy poses as a doorman (with a uniform, a fake moustache and spectacles) to block the access of the corridor and let Jim do a dirty job (Jim climbs and hides in the upper pipes); Willy also helps Barney as a trainer.

Review:
Good first part from an episode that is a remake of the season 2 "The Council" that now takes place in the boxing underworld: also written by Woodfield-Balter, directed by Paul Stanley and played by Robert Phillips; the characters of Frank Wayne and Johnny are replaced now by Buckman and Wesley who is ordered to eliminate a black sheep (boxer Artie Calvitos). Great urban score by Lalo Schifrin that borrow from jazz (see the arragements a la "Bullitt"), military and Eastern Indian music (see the percussions from "Coogan's Bluff")--one of the most recycled score from the entire series.

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2008 - 10:38 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

S3's episode "Doomsday" is a show I remember fondly from my childhood (I audiotaped the tape and apartment scenes back then) and it's fun that Khigh Dhiegh--"Wo Fat" to you on the mainland who don't know-- is one of those bidding on the plutonium. I can easily imagine Wo trying to get his hands on some of that stuff in order to threaten Hawaii. Philip Ahn also appears.

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2008 - 11:29 AM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

***SYNDICATE TERRITORY***

...the council will judge Charles Buckman...

***Spoiler***





56-THE CONTENDER, PART II
(produced by William Read Woodfield and Allan Balter)

Summary:
Rollin scratches a dice as a diversion and shows it to Wesley. Jim escapes from the ring and the game is stopped. Barney fights Stevens--who keeps on breathing some gas while spitting--and wins. Rollin goes to the office of Buckman to sign a contract for Barney and turns down his bribery offer. At a cheap hotel, Wesley breaks in the room of Rollin to threaten him with the stove’s gas and he reluctantly signs. Jim uses a list of major bookies to create bets sham and pretends to put a tail on a mysterious lady. Barney is on the payroll and does a series of tricked matches. Finally, Barney fights Ernie Staczek and decides not to loose. During the game, Buckman gives Wesley’s pin tie to Ernie to add to his glove and to hit Barney (first the scratched glove, then the opened and bleeding arch of the eye-brow). Buckman is summoned to appear before Dan Whelan. Cinnamon slips an envelop filed with bet receipts into Buckman’s jacket and she is accused of the high bets owing to two items (a white comb with locks of black hair, violet sunglasses) of disguises found in her hand bag. Whelan orders Vince to gun down Wesley and Buckman dry. Barney steps into his changing-room so that Richy Lemoine talks to the press of his official retirement.

Cast and details:
Boxer Stevens and boxer Tony Calabasos played by Joey Giambra and Richard Cangey. Featuring guest female IMF extra Rena (no actor credits), carrying violet sunglasses, and thanks to the bookies’ list of Jim, makes a series of separate high bets on Richy Lemoine (and a fat one at Jim’s booth for $25,000) for a total of $100,000. The beginning of the episode has a 6 minutes 40 trailer of Part I including the tape scene, the dossier scene and scenes selection. As in the pilot, Cinnamon is dressed in pink and kisses Buckman. We can notice two daring composed shots: first, a shot made throughout a machine and, here, under the stove when Rollin is cooked by Wesley and, second, a reflection shot of Richy Lemoine’s sunglasses (Cf. “Cool Hand Luke”) watching the match. The bet business backroom forestalls the setting of “The Sting” (1973).

Review:
The conclusion is not as good as Part I but decent. This type of boxing drama is reminiscent of many old classics as: "Body and Soul" (1947), "Champion" (1949), "Somebody Up There Likes Me" (1956) which denounce corruption.

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2008 - 11:33 AM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

There's one other thing about "The Contender" that makes me think they at first intended it to air in a two hour time slot, and that's the fact that there's only one set of end credits, meaning characters who only appeared in part 1 or part 2 appear in the end credits both times (the most notable example being Robert Conrad, who cameoed in Part 1 as Barney's trainer)



I recall now, there are missing scenes with Robert Conrad who is introduced to Barney in the corridor. Scenes with Conrad's team.
Even, the Rena character is too rushed???

 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2008 - 1:34 PM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

***SPOILERS***


57-THE MERCENARIES (First Produced)
(produced by William Read Woodfield and Allan Balter)

Tape scene:
Recycled, shortened and re-edited from the season 2 "Echo of Yesterday" in which Jim listens to a car's tape. Notice the added insert with the picture of Colonel Krim and an out of focus fat tape player in the background.

Summary:
Hidden in an African bank ("Banque de la republique") as a military headquarter, General Hans Krim and his mercenaries own a stock of gold, won by fighting for independant nations. The IMF infiltrates the place in many directions--insider Rollin to excite the greed of Krim with the lost gold of the 20th Colonial Brigade, gunrunner Jim and his wife Cinnamon who teases the love appetite of Krim while Barney and Willy remove the gold loot from a tunnel--and let Major Gruner eliminate Colonel Krim.

Cast and details:
Head mercenaries Colonel Hans Krim, Major Jan Gruner and his men: private Karl, Sergeant Gorte and sentry Stohlman are played by Pernell Roberts, Skip Homeier, Bo Svenson, Victor Tayback and William Lucking. As Artemus Gordon in "The Night of the Bottomless Pit", Rollin poses as deserter-convict Lt. Alex Moreland from the 20th Colonial Brigade that has a bad time with the mercenaries: hanged by the hands by Karl (because he slaps him with his belt to deliver a military jeep to Barney and Willy) and then shot down (two blank bullets) in the back (see "Trek") like a running fugitive by Krim and dive into the pond; Rollin imitates the voices of Krim and, thanks to Jim's tape recorder hidden in his truck, the sentry Stohlman over the phone to give misinformations to Gruner and tease his jealousy. As in "The Contender, Part II", there's a daring shot made throughout a machine and, here, a wood-burning stove in which Barney puts away the gold bars. Jim poses as false missionary reverend Jim Wilson, representative of the Light of Africa who provides Bibles and rifles in his big truck. Cinnamon poses as his hot wife, Catherine. Barney and Willy are delivered in boxes of Bibles and open an underground gallery to convert the gold: Barney uses a metal detector and tests the ceiling waiting for Jim to release a marble in the vault; Willy then puts a hole with a very long drill; Barney installs a multi-parts cylinder into the hole and switches on a motor; Barney and Willy carry gas masks and activate the umbrella heater-toaster that rise up and melt the bars of gold at 2200 degrees Fahrenheit; the gold falls into the cylinder and Barney spreads the hot liquid into bars' molds; to conclude, Barney adds a canister of grey paint into the cylinder and activates the rotating painting fountain device that covers the dirty floor with a color; Barney and Willy store the loot into the mercenaries' jeep that Rollin steals. Barney connects himself to the telephone line and listens to Krim's conversation to sentry Stohlman. As in "The Slave", Cinnamon is the female item that is lusted after! During the adultary scene, Jim steps into the room, threatens Krim with his automatic revolver and discreetly substitutes the cartridge clip. After platinium bricks in "Charity", now the IMF robs gold bars! No dossier scene as in "The Heir Apparent" therefore the MISSION logo appears at the start of Act I.

Review:
Perfectly cast, perfectly executed, amusing trojan horse plot with a phony Light of Africa MISSION gunrunner plus Martin Landau's good performance. The subtheme of the jealous husband is recycled from the season 1 "Odds on Evil". Moreover, I enjoy the low angle shot of the barbecue grill where is stored the gold of Rollin's Infantry. Robert Drasnin's score is too sparse and reminiscent of "The Wild Wild West" and heavily tracked with suspenseful stock music by Lalo Schifrin and the final heroic departure cue by Gerald Fried.

Stock music:
"Operation Rogosh" (dominant), "Pilot", "The Heir Apparent", "Odds on Evil".

 
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